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Forum topic by Greg In Maryland posted 1064 days ago 1076 views 0 times favorited 6 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Greg In Maryland

381 posts in 1594 days


1064 days ago

Topic tags/keywords: workbench

Hey,

Having brisk competition in my household for cash, I am building my new bench out of dimensional lumber (2x) instead of hard maple, hickory, oak, ash, etc., etc. I am looking at this as a practice run to figure out everything I don’t like about a bench for the next time.

I plan on applying mortise and tenon breadboard caps on the ends of the workbench. So, do I flatten the workbench first and then apply the end caps, or do I add add the end caps and then flatten the entire bench. Obviously I have a grain orientation issue and will have to do some gyrations with my plane, but that’s part of the fun.

Thanks.


6 replies so far

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higtron

192 posts in 1274 days


#1 posted 1064 days ago

When I built mine I flattened the bench first , and then added the breadboard.

-- If I cut it too short I can scab a piece on, but if it's too long what do I do?

View Smitty_Cabinetshop's profile

Smitty_Cabinetshop

9574 posts in 1215 days


#2 posted 1064 days ago

Greg;

See answer 24,621.

Hah!

Psuedo-seriously, though, isn’t there always a final surfacing applied to work when all is done and assembled? Why would a benchtop be any different? Get it all laminated, apply the breadboard ends that have been cut to close size, then go to town. Can’t imagine it being very productive to make one or the other perfect and then work around it while flattening / smoothing the rest of the work surface.

I have ‘strips’ at the front and back edges of my bench, did what I’m suggesting as well. Didn’t have perpendicular grain issues of course, but I expect you’ll do well.

-- Don't anthropomorphize your handplanes. They hate it when you do that. -- OldTools Archive

View David Kirtley's profile

David Kirtley

1276 posts in 1594 days


#3 posted 1064 days ago

Offset the breadboard edge a bit lower than middle so if you flatten several times, it is not too close to the top.

-- Woodworking shouldn't cost a fortune: http://lowbudgetwoodworker.blogspot.com/

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Greg In Maryland

381 posts in 1594 days


#4 posted 1063 days ago

Thanks for the replies.

Questions 32459 to 32460 for Higtron:

How did you attach the breadboard end? It looks like there are two sets of plugs on the end of each board. Are they covering lag bolts, screws, drawbolts or something else?

How did you go about the glue up of the breadboard ends? Glue at the ends, in the middle, slopped all over or not at all?

Thanks.

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higtron

192 posts in 1274 days


#5 posted 1063 days ago

lag bolts the ends are slotted for expansion

-- If I cut it too short I can scab a piece on, but if it's too long what do I do?

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higtron

192 posts in 1274 days


#6 posted 1063 days ago

no glue on breadboard just six lag bolts two fixed in the middle and two on each end for expansion. I used my biscut joiter to make an extra long slots on the breadboard and the bench put two biscuts in just for alighnment no glue.

-- If I cut it too short I can scab a piece on, but if it's too long what do I do?

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