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How do I remove or cut down glaze coat?

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Forum topic by NMADVR posted 08-23-2011 09:37 PM 7599 views 0 times favorited 10 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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NMADVR

7 posts in 1165 days


08-23-2011 09:37 PM

Hello,

I recently used Famowood glaze coat on a 12’ oak landing tread with horrible results. The glaze coat rippled and dimpled in several spots. I called Famowood tech support and discussd my process and the determination was that I usd 1/2 of the necessary amount of material therefore causing it to pull while trying to self level and I should do a 2nd pour to cover the bad spots. I’m not comfortable adding more glaze and would like to just sand it down and make it go away. This stuff is very perisistent and Im not sure what the proper method is to remove or sand/cut down. Can someone tell me what type of sander I need to do this?

I really appreciate some guidance here. thank you!

Best regards,
Nelson

The project was originally to install the hardwood over concrete on the lower level however the concrete seem conecting the two levels was so uneven and elevated in several spots that I decided to build the landing tread out over the uneaven spots. I’m not unhappy with the final result of the floor but the step is a splinter in my side. :-)


10 replies so far

View Steven H's profile

Steven H

1114 posts in 1756 days


#1 posted 08-25-2011 05:19 AM

180-220 grit with Random orbit sander is fine.

View NMADVR's profile

NMADVR

7 posts in 1165 days


#2 posted 08-25-2011 02:30 PM

Thank you Steven. I will give it a try.

View ajosephg's profile

ajosephg

1854 posts in 2257 days


#3 posted 08-25-2011 03:37 PM

I would further recommend using wet sandpaper (as used by body shops), otherwise the grit will load up in about 10 seconds ;)

-- Joe

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

112363 posts in 2273 days


#4 posted 08-25-2011 03:50 PM

If Stevens approach doesn’t work you my have to start with much courser gits and work you way back up to 180.
It might be easy to take it up sand and reinstall if you have to sand most of the finish off.

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View NMADVR's profile

NMADVR

7 posts in 1165 days


#5 posted 08-25-2011 10:38 PM

Thank you all for the suggestions. I wont be able to take up the the tread without it breaking.
Regarding the wet sandpaper I am assuming i need a wet sander, is that true? I have only basic sanding experience. Thanks!

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

112363 posts in 2273 days


#6 posted 08-25-2011 11:33 PM

Since you can’t take it up I would put a couple layers of masking tape where you don’t want to sand. Wet sanding can be done with a standard radium orbital sander or by hand you don’t need a lot of water to wet sand . There are types of sand paper that are made for wet sanding .you can usually buy it at a wood working store or an auto paint store.

http://www.woodmagazine.com/materials-guide/sanding/wet-sanding/

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View NMADVR's profile

NMADVR

7 posts in 1165 days


#7 posted 08-28-2011 12:51 PM

BEFORE:

AFTER:

Thank you to everyone who offered advice, I really appreciate it. I ended up using a orbital sanding disk that I attached to my high speed drill. I started with 60 grit and used a damp cloth to continually wipe down the board and wipe off the sand paper since the glaze coat would build up quick on the sand paper. I have to say I was totally shocked that it cut right through the glaze coat with relative ease. I used a basic fiinish sander to finish the tread and it came out pefectly. I was able to restore back to natural and I sealed with semi-gloss acrylic laquer to stay as close to natural as possible. I have 3 coats on and i’m using a steel wool to finish. I’m gonna put about 7-8 coats. Ive added a new pic to show before and after (one is a little blurry). Again thank you all for your suggestions!
Best regards,
Nelson

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NMADVR

7 posts in 1165 days


#8 posted 08-30-2011 05:17 AM

Here’s a better view of the final work.

This step although it doesnt look like much was really pandora’s box. All I wanted to do was install the floor over concrete on the lower level. Since the seem between the two concrete levels was unmanageable for me I deicided to build the step out. No problem I can build steps. What i didnt know was how horribly wrong the existing floor was installed on the upper level. Long story short the concrete was not leveled correctly and either the wrong flooring glue or not enough glue or both was (or wasn’t) used.

First I needed to remove the old stair nosing that was incorrectly installed then I needed to cut a straight line across to match up the new stair tread. I marked my cut line and proceeded to cut my line using my Fein multimaster (the cool tool I hardly use because the replacement blades are expensive and wear out too quickly… but I thank God everytime i use it cause it was a life saver). This is when pandora’s box really opened… the old floor was coming up in several spots and was completely uneven across the front of the step. This left me no choice but to sand the edge across the seems since there was no typical flooring tongue and groove. Fixing the poor original was not an option and I thought it best to not mess with it any further.

Soooooo….. long story even longer here is my question…. Has anyone ever tried to match the finish on hardwood flooring without sanding the whole board. I need to finish coat the ends of the planks across the seem and I’d love to do it without having to completely strip the entire length of the affected boards. You can see it along the back seem in both pics.

Any ideas how to blend them? Thanks for listening.

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

112363 posts in 2273 days


#9 posted 08-30-2011 05:29 AM

Kind of going about trying to blend the color the hard way after you have the clear coat is on. The only thing I can think to do is add some tint to some clear coat and sneak up on it.

http://www.woodcraft.com/Product/2005522/17818/Mixol-10-Piece-Woodworkers-Tones-Set.aspx

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View Arlin Eastman's profile

Arlin Eastman

2128 posts in 1257 days


#10 posted 08-30-2011 06:12 AM

You can always add a good wood paste wax with 4 odd steel wool. I have not done this just read it many times.
Arlin

-- It is always the right time, to do the right thing.

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