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Forum topic by JPB posted 1052 days ago 921 views 0 times favorited 7 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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JPB

31 posts in 1113 days


1052 days ago

but this site seems to get a lot more traffic. Forgive me.

I’m looking at putting some 3/4” nail down hardwood over an OSB subfloor. The OSB has quite a bit of tear out from the removal of an old glue down flooring. I’m wondering if anybody has tried leveling compound under a nail down floor. Some have told me the staples will shatter the hardened leveler and some have told me it will be fine. What about Fix-itAll – says its sandable and drillable, anybody know if its nailable?

Thanks
Joe


7 replies so far

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ShaneA

5201 posts in 1181 days


#1 posted 1052 days ago

What about luan underlayment? Should be a little more than 1/8” thick. Which could create problems with door trim and other things like that. But it will give you a smooth nailable surface.

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JPB

31 posts in 1113 days


#2 posted 1052 days ago

I thought about putting something down on top of it, but this problem exists in a hallway with transitions into a dining room and living room. I was afraid the added thickness would make my transitions messy. Luan is only 1/8 of an inch?

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Moron

4666 posts in 2476 days


#3 posted 1052 days ago

Durobond 90 drywall compound

-- "Good artists borrow, great artists steal”…..Picasso

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ShaneA

5201 posts in 1181 days


#4 posted 1052 days ago

I think it is 5mm, pretty thin, but I figure the hieght increase amost always causes some sort of issue somewhere.

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crank49

3323 posts in 1554 days


#5 posted 1052 days ago

Unless you have holes more than 12” across I’d just put the hardwood on top of the OSB. 3/4” hardwood won’t sag or do anything weird just because of a little tearout. If the OSB is broken up to the point the hardwood can’t lay flat on top of it, the OSB needs to be replaced anyway.

-- Michael :-{| “If you tell a big enough lie and tell it frequently enough, it will be believed.” ― A H

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JPB

31 posts in 1113 days


#6 posted 1052 days ago

Crank – most of the surface has some tear out on it in some form or another. Parts of the glue that was holding down the old floor didn’t hold at all and the square parquet tiles came up with no sweat, but most of it is pretty beat up. My 2 thoughts were 1. replace it or 2. put a skim coat of something on it to fill the tear out – its not very deep.

So you think replace? That makes me sad.

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Sawkerf

1730 posts in 1651 days


#7 posted 1052 days ago

Figure the cost (time and material) of replacement v.s. the cost (mostly time) of trying to save it. Since it’s OSB, it should be a no brainer.

-- Adversity doesn't build character...................it reveals it.

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