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How About cherry

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Forum topic by therookie posted 08-22-2011 05:21 PM 1051 views 0 times favorited 13 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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therookie

887 posts in 1484 days


08-22-2011 05:21 PM

Anyone have any good finishes for cherry?

-- http://aewoodworks.webs.com


13 replies so far

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Scott Bryan

27251 posts in 2479 days


#1 posted 08-22-2011 06:59 PM

I generally sand it to 180 grit, put on a coat of boiled linseed oil and use a topcoat of either polyurethane or shellac.

-- Challenges are what make life interesting; overcoming them is what makes life meaningful- Joshua Marine

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Maveric777

2690 posts in 1734 days


#2 posted 08-22-2011 07:09 PM

“Natural” Danish oil then wax is my personal favorite. Why mess with something that’s already beautiful….

-- Dan ~ Texarkana, Tx.

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lew

10035 posts in 2413 days


#3 posted 08-22-2011 07:10 PM

clear whatever. allow the natural beauty of the Cherry.

-- Lew- Time traveler. Purveyor of the Universe's finest custom rolling pins.

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

1794 posts in 1150 days


#4 posted 08-22-2011 08:16 PM

Typically I would put on a coat of BLO, the top coat with an alkyd/soya varnish, not nearly as amber as any of the poly formulas; although the BLO provides a lot of amber. But on my last project, a TV cabinet I just finished, I used garnet shellac and really like the way it looks. Not a lot of color, and once the cherry darkens naturally will not hide the look.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, we sent 'em to Washington.

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Gary

7253 posts in 2090 days


#5 posted 08-22-2011 09:11 PM

depends on what the project is

-- Gary, DeKalb Texas only 4 miles from the mill

View CharlieM1958's profile

CharlieM1958

15698 posts in 2876 days


#6 posted 08-22-2011 09:24 PM

Whatever you do to it, keep in mind that it will get considerably darker over time.

-- Charlie M. "Woodworking - patience = firewood"

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therookie

887 posts in 1484 days


#7 posted 08-23-2011 12:46 AM

The project is a jewlery chest I think I may do a spray on lacquer or poly not to sure.

-- http://aewoodworks.webs.com

View pintodeluxe's profile

pintodeluxe

3365 posts in 1470 days


#8 posted 08-23-2011 02:21 AM

The big issue with cherry is blotching. Wipe on a wash coat of bullseye seal coat shellac (thinned 3 parts denatured alcohol : 2 parts shellac). That will dry is 5 minutes. Then apply your stain. After a few minutes, wipe it back to the desired color. Then spray 2 coats of pre-catalyzed lacquer.
The stain pictured is Varathane brand Dark Walnut

-- Willie, Washington "If You Choose Not To Decide, You Still Have Made a Choice" - Rush

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Jonathan

2605 posts in 1708 days


#9 posted 08-23-2011 02:53 AM

My personal preference for cherry is to not use any sort of stain, and to let the wood speak for itself. With that being said, if you’re not going to use an oil, or oil-based finish on it, you’ll certainly want to think about how to avoid the blotching issue, as mentioned by pintodeluxe above.

Shellac, Charles Neil Blotch Control, or any other seal coat laid down first, then followed by your lacquer, poly, or other topcoat. You could wax after that too.

It will get darker with time. Heck, if you set a freshly sanded or planed piece of it out in the sun for a couple of hours, you’ll notice a difference. It’s a great way to add a little bit of quick age to it before applying your finish, then it’ll continue to darken farther as it ages.

-- Jonathan, Denver, CO "Constructive criticism is welcome and valued as it gives me new perspectives and helps me to advance as a woodworker."

View Fuzzy's profile

Fuzzy

292 posts in 2646 days


#10 posted 08-28-2011 10:33 PM

AMEN … at least there are two of us …

-- - dabbling in sarcasm is foolish … if you’re not proficient at it, you end up looking stupid … ... ...

View Les 's profile

Les

199 posts in 1348 days


#11 posted 08-29-2011 10:49 PM

Well are you going to tell us??? Do you use shellac or something first to control blotching? Both pieces are beautiful by the way!!!!!

-- Stay busy....Stay young

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Fuzzy

292 posts in 2646 days


#12 posted 08-30-2011 10:47 PM

On this piece, I applied a few light coats of TRIED & TRUE OIL … followed by some WATCO OIL with dye(s) added to get the color I wanted … then topped it off with several coats of thinned WATERLOX.

I did another one more recently (I’ll try to find the photos) and used Charles Neil’s Blotch Control … followed by dye(s) ... and topped with lots of Waterlox. I like the second method better … I’ve never seen anything that stops blotching in it’s tracks like Charles’ product.

-- - dabbling in sarcasm is foolish … if you’re not proficient at it, you end up looking stupid … ... ...

View Jonathan's profile

Jonathan

2605 posts in 1708 days


#13 posted 08-31-2011 01:03 AM

I have 2-containers of Charles Neil’s Blotch Control that I’ve had for some time now and still haven’t opened it. It’s going to be used on riftsawn white oak and riftsawn white oak plywood so that they both take the color evenly. I haven’t experimented with it at all yet, and have heard nothing but good things about it in regards to controlling blotching.

-- Jonathan, Denver, CO "Constructive criticism is welcome and valued as it gives me new perspectives and helps me to advance as a woodworker."

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