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best filler for knots in black walnut?

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Forum topic by romeege posted 10-23-2018 07:48 PM 810 views 0 times favorited 22 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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romeege

21 posts in 3184 days


10-23-2018 07:48 PM

Topic tags/keywords: knot filler

I am wondering how to deal with these two big holes in two knots….here are a couple pics… thanks for any ideas guys!


22 replies so far

View HokieKen's profile

HokieKen

6613 posts in 1314 days


#1 posted 10-23-2018 07:56 PM

I’ve dealt with similar knots 2 ways. One is to mix Walnut sawdust with yellow wood glue and use it like putty to fill it. The second, and my preference for your situation, is to mix some black dye in epoxy and use that to fill.

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

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Andre

2140 posts in 1982 days


#2 posted 10-23-2018 07:58 PM

Epoxy and or with a little charcoal?

-- Lifting one end of the plank.

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Manitario

2654 posts in 3059 days


#3 posted 10-23-2018 08:00 PM

Depends what sort of look you want. I’ve used epoxy many times to fill knots; eg. West Systems. You can leave it clear, tint it etc.

-- Sometimes the creative process requires foul language. -- Charles Neil

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ScottM

689 posts in 2322 days


#4 posted 10-23-2018 08:05 PM

Just plain epoxy. No sawdust or fillers.

View Zonker's profile

Zonker

12 posts in 27 days


#5 posted 10-23-2018 08:05 PM

I have used Fiberglass resin in SYP with good results. It is very watery so you’d want to tape the back side so it all doesn’t just run out. It dries fairly clear and pretty hard, will sand nicely, but it won’t take stain. I’ve never tried adding any dyes to it, but I googled that and it seems possible. Hope this helps.

-- Larry A. - I've made a small fortune with my woodworking. The trouble is, I started with a large fortune.

View waho6o9's profile

waho6o9

8487 posts in 2753 days


#6 posted 10-23-2018 08:10 PM

Maybe knock it out and glue in a walnut dowel.

View Woodchuckswife's profile

Woodchuckswife

21 posts in 1486 days


#7 posted 10-23-2018 08:20 PM

Walnut saw dust and glue mixed like a paste fill and let dry, then sand with a lite coat of glue and let dry. then finish sand. I have don cracks that way and then later could not find them even knowing they were there.Good luck.
Chuck

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romeege

21 posts in 3184 days


#8 posted 10-23-2018 08:32 PM

thanks guys…it looks like epoxy is the winner, but I guess the trick will be how to squeegie it off of surface flush… the piece is already finished

View Snowbeast's profile

Snowbeast

95 posts in 1514 days


#9 posted 10-23-2018 08:47 PM

I usually pack it full of walnut sanding dust and then drizzle with thin CA glue. Actually, a slight overfill works best. Then just sand flush.

Can’t help you much with the already finished part. But next time…..

View GaryCN's profile

GaryCN

358 posts in 4110 days


#10 posted 10-23-2018 09:02 PM

I’ve done that, fast fix as you can sand it in almost immediately.


I usually pack it full of walnut sanding dust and then drizzle with thin CA glue. Actually, a slight overfill works best. Then just sand flush.

Can t help you much with the already finished part. But next time…..

- Snowbeast


-- Quando Omni Flunkus Moritati

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Aj2

1801 posts in 1974 days


#11 posted 10-23-2018 10:19 PM

That is not a bad looking knot. Not every knot needs filling so I would not worry about it.
See what I did :<)

-- Aj

View pottz's profile

pottz

3352 posts in 1160 days


#12 posted 10-23-2018 10:29 PM



I ve dealt with similar knots 2 ways. One is to mix Walnut sawdust with yellow wood glue and use it like putty to fill it. The second, and my preference for your situation, is to mix some black dye in epoxy and use that to fill.

- HokieKen


ditto but already finished is tough.you could try and fill as close as you can then take a razor blade and cut it flush before the epoxy gets totally hard,but i dont know how good its gonna look.maybe just live with it.

-- sawdust the bigger the pile the bigger my smile-larry,so cal.

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LesB

1838 posts in 3619 days


#13 posted 10-23-2018 10:34 PM

I’m a fan of the CA glue technique. Much easier to use than epoxy. There are three thicknesses of CA glue. I find medium works for most cracks, knots (still in place), and voids. For larger openings I fill then with fine sawdust then apply a shot of thin super glue followed immediately with the thick glue. The thin glue acts as a wicking agent to draw the thick glue into the sawdust. Keep adding the thick glue until it stops soaking in. It can take 15 minutes or so for the glue to set up in a deep opening or use the accelerator spray.

I collected the sawdust from a orbital or belt sander with a dust collector bag attached. I have a collection of various sawdust wood types saved in small jars and use this technique all the time on lathe work.

-- Les B, Oregon

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bilyo

393 posts in 1278 days


#14 posted 10-23-2018 10:46 PM


thanks guys…it looks like epoxy is the winner, but I guess the trick will be how to squeegie it off of surface flush… the piece is already finished

- romeege

Since you all ready have finish on it, your options are more limited. Aj2 suggested leaving it alone which is a good suggestion if your taste will tolerate it. Otherwise, if you are very careful, you might be able to fill with epoxy just til it reaches the rim of each hole. Let surface tension mound it up a bit, but don’t let it run out onto the adjoining surface. Once cured you might then be able to carefully shave, scrape, and/or sand level without much damage to the finish. You will need lots of care and a bit of luck.

The thought occurs to me that you might be able to apply a coat of wax around the area before applying the epoxy. Just don’t get any in the holes, of course. Another idea: if the knot holes go all the way through, maybe you can apply some wide clear packing tape over the holes on the finished side and then apply the epoxy from the back and let it cure. Once cured, the epoxy surface should be close to flush and require very little work, if any. It might not be perfect, but maybe close enough, as they say.

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Rich

3759 posts in 765 days


#15 posted 10-23-2018 11:02 PM

Even if you can level the epoxy, you will still need to give it another topcoat, otherwise the sheens won’t match.

Unless the area will see significant wear, I’d go with ebony colored Timbermate. It’ll be the easiest to level using a putty knife, and a quick touch up with 320 or 400 grit paper will smooth it completely. Then give it one more coat of finish to seal it.

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

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