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Bit for a router plane????

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Forum topic by msinc posted 10-20-2018 01:15 AM 485 views 0 times favorited 13 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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msinc

552 posts in 674 days


10-20-2018 01:15 AM

What is everyone’s favorite bit for using a router plane? Any one out there try one of those Amana bits with the indexable inserts? I currently have a couple bits that have carbide cutting edges but it seems like they go dull. Do any of you folks use high speed steel so you can easily sharpen it or is that a waste? Thanks in advance for any info!!!


13 replies so far

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TheFridge

10499 posts in 1657 days


#1 posted 10-20-2018 01:36 AM

I am kinda confused? Router plane as in the non-electron using hand tool? Or the router with a bit that spins at many thousands of rpms?

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

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bondogaposis

5043 posts in 2522 days


#2 posted 10-20-2018 01:37 AM

Alder.

-- Bondo Gaposis

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TheFridge

10499 posts in 1657 days


#3 posted 10-20-2018 01:38 AM

Well played my good man. Very well played.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

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lumbering_on

559 posts in 661 days


#4 posted 10-20-2018 01:41 AM


I am kinda confused? Router plane as in the non-electron using hand tool? Or the router with a bit that spins at many thousands of rpms?

- TheFridge

This is what I thought was a router plane.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B_2a_FwjAgk

No bits, just a chisel. Is this referring to using a router in a jig to plane wood?

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bandit571

21483 posts in 2854 days


#5 posted 10-20-2018 02:04 AM

Sometimes called a Chisel Plane…..sometimes called an Old Woman’s Tooth….

-- A Planer? I'M the planer, this is what I use

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BlasterStumps

942 posts in 610 days


#6 posted 10-20-2018 03:23 AM

I think the OP missed a letter in his thread title. Maybe router planer instead of router plane
? Talking about a router sled set up possibly?

-- "I build for function first, looks second. Most times I never get around to looks." - Mike, western Colorado

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Ocelot

2103 posts in 2809 days


#7 posted 10-20-2018 03:34 AM

He’s asking about a spoilboard bit for a router to be used with a router sled to flatten a slab.

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msinc

552 posts in 674 days


#8 posted 10-20-2018 01:08 PM

Sorry for the confusion…endless apologies and a thousand pardons. Okay, router planer/router sled is what I am asking about. One could deduct the word “bit” would, by and of itself, denote the machine version. Whereas “iron” should denote the hand operated manual version used to manually cut rabbets and dado’s? At least, I have yet to hear anyone refer to the cutting device in a hand plane as a bit. But, I guess anything that cuts could be called a bit.
I have further, not as yet, known of Amana making a plane iron that has replaceable inserts {as noted in my first post}. So again, yes, the machine version for flattening sometimes large pieces of wood. Also, if someone would be kind enough to explain the term “spoil board”? I have heard it, but wonder about the definition. Thanks again for any information!!!

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EdDantes

33 posts in 81 days


#9 posted 10-20-2018 05:57 PM

Yes, you can use the Amana bits. I’ve done it with the RC-2250 . But note that they’re technically specified for CNC. If you are going to use it in a handheld router, I would absolutely do so in a sled, being sure to take light passes and going slow. If you’re going to count on your hands to be the only thing to control it, it may be a recipe for disaster. My sled has dados cut into the sidewalls which the sub-base rides in which helps hold the router down.

If you don’t want to drop ~$200 on a bit, you could always go with something like this

It will work, but the downside is that when it goes dull you’ll either have to buy a new one or have it re-sharpened. at this price, it’s essentially a disposable item. The benefit to the Amana is if you’re going to be flattening a lot of slabs (or repeatedly surfacing the CNC spoilboard) so that you can just replace the inserts.

And to answer your question: a spoilboard is the surface on the bed of a CNC router (or other similar machine). It maintains a flat surface, but doesn’t damage the cutter if you’re making a through cut on a workpiece. In so doing, it can get light cuts in it, thus “spoiling” it. Instead of replacing it you use one of these cutters to shave off the top and restore it to flat.

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msinc

552 posts in 674 days


#10 posted 10-20-2018 08:21 PM


Yes, you can use the Amana bits. I ve done it with the RC-2250 . But note that they re technically specified for CNC. If you are going to use it in a handheld router, I would absolutely do so in a sled, being sure to take light passes and going slow. If you re going to count on your hands to be the only thing to control it, it may be a recipe for disaster. My sled has dados cut into the sidewalls which the sub-base rides in which helps hold the router down.

If you don t want to drop ~$200 on a bit, you could always go with something like this

It will work, but the downside is that when it goes dull you ll either have to buy a new one or have it re-sharpened. at this price, it s essentially a disposable item. The benefit to the Amana is if you re going to be flattening a lot of slabs (or repeatedly surfacing the CNC spoilboard) so that you can just replace the inserts.

And to answer your question: a spoilboard is the surface on the bed of a CNC router (or other similar machine). It maintains a flat surface, but doesn t damage the cutter if you re making a through cut on a workpiece. In so doing, it can get light cuts in it, thus “spoiling” it. Instead of replacing it you use one of these cutters to shave off the top and restore it to flat.

- EdDantes

Yes sir, that second bit and others like it are very similar to what I am using now. You are right, they seem to go dull pretty quick. Then again I am sure it has something to do with just how much wood is being moved that makes it seem like they don’t last long. Dados in the sled are interesting…I can see how that would add some safety and also some stability to the router as it is cutting.
Thank you for the explanation of “spoil” board…now the term makes sense.

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runswithscissors

2866 posts in 2196 days


#11 posted 10-22-2018 11:49 PM

Grizzly, and others, make a bowl routing bit that has slightly rounded corners. Gives you a smooth surface without slight ridges or grooves. But I can’t help you with the longevity problem.

-- I admit to being an adrenaline junky; fortunately, I'm very easily frightened

View msinc's profile

msinc

552 posts in 674 days


#12 posted 10-23-2018 01:35 AM

Thanks again to all who have replied…I will check out the Grizzly bit. I don’t necessarily need/want or expect the surface to be real smooth…I’d just like it to be flat and the bit not go dull too quickly. I can see how a radius on the corners would help to smooth things out a little.

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Rayne

1091 posts in 1710 days


#13 posted 10-23-2018 02:01 AM

Whiteside makes one too, which is also for CNC. It’s not indexable, but it is a heck of a lot cheaper and Whiteside does have a good rep.

https://www.amazon.com/Whiteside-Spoilboard-Surfacing-Router-Shank/dp/B0728GYZFW/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1540260049&sr=8-2&keywords=whiteside+slab&dpID=41BuUb2lhyL&preST=_SY300_QL70_&dpSrc=srch

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