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gluing dowels

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Forum topic by Karda posted 10-18-2018 03:39 AM 438 views 0 times favorited 11 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Karda

1303 posts in 728 days


10-18-2018 03:39 AM

Hi< I am doweling a bowel blank and was wonder what glue is better titebond wood glue or epoxy. I s wood glue safe to use thanks


11 replies so far

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WoodenDreams

209 posts in 85 days


#1 posted 10-18-2018 05:08 AM

Titebond III is FDA approved for indirect food contact. as their website says, great for around the kitchen use. For epoxy Loctite and JB has FDA approved epoxy. You could also goggle food safe glues or epoxy.

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Karda

1303 posts in 728 days


#2 posted 10-18-2018 05:22 AM

thanks that is good to knowbut I was wondering if it is safe to turn a bowl wigth dowels blued with wood glue

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johnstoneb

3036 posts in 2347 days


#3 posted 10-18-2018 01:15 PM

Yes

-- Bruce, Boise, ID

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Nubsnstubs

1414 posts in 1904 days


#4 posted 10-18-2018 02:02 PM

The glue is stronger than the wood. You didn’t say how deep the holes are, so here is how I do it. Squirt some glue into the hole. Run a pencil down into it to aid in coating the entire inside of the hole. Spread glue onto the dowel and then insert it into the hole. You might need a mallet to assist in persuading the dowel to go all the way through, so don’t have a dowel any longer that 1 inch of the hole.

If you haven’t already done this, try the fit of the dowels. If there is too much interference, sand them in a drill…

Don’t be concerned if you get glue on the surface as you’re gonna turn it off anyway. Good luck. ......Jerry (in Tucson)

-- Jerry (in Tucson) www.woodturnerstools.com

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LeeMills

610 posts in 1476 days


#5 posted 10-18-2018 03:28 PM

A key question for me is… Is the blank wet (green) or dry.

For dry I would use wood glue such as Titebond. I have never had a problem with it in about 40 years. Others have reported problems when gluing wood with it becoming soft, gumming up sandpaper, or becoming brittle.
For wet I would use medium CA glue as it will form a strong bond even with wet wood. Many turners, who turn green, use CA to attach a glue block and do not have problems.
For epoxy I have limited experience. There are probably some that require a dry surface and some than can be used with a wet surface.

If the question is food safe you would have to read the individual data sheets. For me, there is such a tiny area where glue may be present (exposed around a dowell) that it should not matter. I can not imagine anyone ingesting an amount to be harmful in normal use.

-- We cannot solve our problems with the same thinking we used when we created them. Albert Einstein

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Karda

1303 posts in 728 days


#6 posted 10-18-2018 04:40 PM

thanks I won’t be afraid to use wood glue. The wood is fairly dry, cut around March this year. The holes are 4 to 5 ” deep. I have some radiating cracks on one side and am putting a dowel through the crack from each side

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Nubsnstubs

1414 posts in 1904 days


#7 posted 10-19-2018 12:29 AM

Show a picture of what you are gonna do. You dowel placement might be critical…....... Jerry (in Tucson)

-- Jerry (in Tucson) www.woodturnerstools.com

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Karda

1303 posts in 728 days


#8 posted 10-19-2018 03:01 AM

here s the pics the I was going to put in only 1 dowel but I don’t have a bit that long

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Nubsnstubs

1414 posts in 1904 days


#9 posted 10-19-2018 04:04 PM

Mike, it looks like the dowels go into the piece bridging one crack per dowel ending somewhere into the middle of the bowl. My pieces are always hogged out to at least 3/4” thickness before I drill for dowels. I try to keep my drill bit in the wood when drilling across the cracks. When I go back to truing up the outside, I clean up any and all tear out where the dowels go in and come out.

Then I attack the inside. When I start to expose the dowel edge, the thickness is going to be near the size of the dowel. The dowels pretty much have become a thickness gauge.

Your blank probably should have a couple more dowels.

If you have a table saw, you could even use it to cut a kerf across the cracks. Make sure you nail or preferably screw a board to the face of the blank with the cracks in the vertical orientation. Using the fence, raise the blade, and make a cut or several cuts. Remove the board, and use it on the other end. Repeat the cuts, and then make up some slats the thickness of the kerf, and glue them in. What that will do is tie in the cracks to stabilize the blank.

I haven’t done it yet, but in theory, it should work. I think I’ma gonna do it later today because I can. I’ll let you know how it works. ........... Jerry (in Tucson)

-- Jerry (in Tucson) www.woodturnerstools.com

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Karda

1303 posts in 728 days


#10 posted 10-19-2018 05:05 PM

those dowels are long each dowel extend through most of the crack area so most of it is double doweled

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lumbering_on

563 posts in 664 days


#11 posted 10-19-2018 05:38 PM

A quick note on glues, there is nothing special about Titebond’s FDA approval. PVA is allowed as an adhesive for indirect contact with food. PVA is also allowed to be used in coatings as per Title 21. I actually doubt that Titebond actually went to the FDA for approval, and if they did, it doesn’t mean others couldn’t do the same.

https://www.ecfr.gov/cgi-bin/text-idx?SID=e956d645a8b4e6b3e34e4e5d1b690209&mc=true&node=pt21.3.175&rgn=div5#se21.3.175_1350

In other words, feel free to use anything that says ‘glue’ on it, and not worry about it being food safe.

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