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Forum topic by rogerw posted 08-18-2011 04:55 PM 2627 views 1 time favorited 11 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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rogerw

262 posts in 1413 days


08-18-2011 04:55 PM

This is a 3d picture of the router table I am designing. It’s footprint measures 22-1/4” x 31” and stands 42” tall at the tabletop. 42” is what I feel will be a comfortable working height. Is this height stable with that footprint or will it have a tendency of being top heavy? I am planning on two non-swiveling wheels and two legs. I would also like to include a means of raising the legs off of the floor with a swiveling wheel for moving around the shop. Any ideas on that part?

thanx… Roger

-- >> my shop teacher used to say "do the best at everything you make for your mom because you're going to see it for the rest of your life!" <<


11 replies so far

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rogerw

262 posts in 1413 days


#1 posted 08-18-2011 06:57 PM

As a follow-up question is two non-swivel and two locking swivels enough to keep it still while using? I am not familiar with such luxuries so have no experience to fall back on. At 56 yrs old this will be my first roll-around luxury. looking forward to it! :)) (that and the new and improved router table. ;)

-- >> my shop teacher used to say "do the best at everything you make for your mom because you're going to see it for the rest of your life!" <<

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Greedo

468 posts in 1684 days


#2 posted 08-18-2011 07:58 PM

the best adaptation i did to my router table was to put wheels under it, i was concerned about stability during use but it turned out not to be an issue.
i put 2 non swivels at the back, and 2 swiveling ones at the front, none lock-able. my table rests between a wall and a bench, so when i need it i pull it out towards me.
i would recommend putting non swivels at the rear or front, and not at left or right side. otherwise the table may have a bigger tendency to move as you push your workpiece in the direction of the wheels.

mine has somewhat the same footprint as yours though the top is a 26” by 35” torsion box, i wouldn’t worry about top heaviness. my cabinet is made of 3/4 th mdf so it’s the most heavy part. and the bottom drawers are filled with accessories and routers.

the most practical anyway is 4 wheels, you can replace the swiveling ones by legs if stability is an issue. but on a router table you usually don’t need to apply a force great enough that could move the actual table

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rogerw

262 posts in 1413 days


#3 posted 08-19-2011 02:19 PM

Greedo, thank you for that info. Helps more than you think. :)

If I am to understand you correctly your configuration of your wheels is in green (refer to drawing below) and not the red. I had originally thought of doing it the red way but now after reading your reply and picturing the movements of the workpiece it makes more sense the green way. I will be using this in the middle of my (small) shop so nothing will be aiding it’s ability to remain still so I will more than likely be using locking swivel wheels vs just swivel. Overkill perhaps but it’s only a dollar and change for the added feature so why not. It’s only money. :)

Thank you again and if you think about something you might have left out :) feel free to clue me in.

Roger

-- >> my shop teacher used to say "do the best at everything you make for your mom because you're going to see it for the rest of your life!" <<

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rogerw

262 posts in 1413 days


#4 posted 08-19-2011 02:25 PM

PS.. I am planning on opening up the router box in the back and leave it open in the front. My other option is to use a 4” 110v fan I have blowing in across the router and vented back out, all on the back wall. Then close it in the front with a door that lowers downward like a drawbridge.

-- >> my shop teacher used to say "do the best at everything you make for your mom because you're going to see it for the rest of your life!" <<

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LegendInMyOwnMind

198 posts in 1310 days


#5 posted 08-25-2011 03:25 PM

I like having wheels on one end only and a handle on the other. I put the handle end at the outfeed of the tool so that the table won’t move when I push material across. I can lift the one end and roll the table on the wheels on the other end. After all, a router table isn’t that heavy anyway (usually). I do make the wheels lockable but have never used the lock.

-- Doug - When all you own is a hammer, everything looks like a nail.

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rogerw

262 posts in 1413 days


#6 posted 08-27-2011 03:01 PM

@Doug… that’s not a bad idea. never thought of that route. Roger.

-- >> my shop teacher used to say "do the best at everything you make for your mom because you're going to see it for the rest of your life!" <<

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bravozulu

14 posts in 1205 days


#7 posted 09-06-2011 08:36 PM

No comment on the wheels. But, I made my router table along the lines detailed in Bill Hylton’s “Woodworking with the Router”. The revised edition (2006). He talks about size, layout, drawers, fence, dust collection and cooling for the router.

the most remarkable thing, however, is that it features a tilting top. You lift up the top — router and all — to change bits and adjust height. No more crawling on knees, peering into a dark cavern just to swap a bit. Another thing I would advise is getting a fence that allows you to attach a ‘Tall Fence’ add-on. Cutting tenons or using a Vertical Panel Raising bit demand a tall fence.

Woodhaven.com sells a wonderful fence at low cost. It’s very adaptable.

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WoodLov

4 posts in 1172 days


#8 posted 09-16-2011 05:25 PM

Hi
I had built my table based on Norm’s D’lux router table. Though I didn’t purchase the plans, I designed it in solidworks and it was pretty ok. I didn’t build Norms fence. A much better design of the fence was found in the Shopnotes #69. Which I built. If anybody need suggestive plans you can pm me. It is in pdf format. I can mail it to you

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surfin2

51276 posts in 1859 days


#9 posted 09-16-2011 07:04 PM

I was thinking about 4 swivel for my table, 2 on the back, 2 that lock on the front…

-- Rick

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Jeff in Huntersville

402 posts in 1918 days


#10 posted 09-16-2011 07:19 PM

I put four swivel casters on my table. All four locking. I found that with two non-swivelling casters it wasn’t always easy to move where I wanted it. It’s an important piece of equipment and needs to be stable. Don’t go cheap on the casters. Woodcraft has excellent ones for about $10 each.

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surfin2

51276 posts in 1859 days


#11 posted 09-16-2011 11:11 PM

I was wondering what would be the all around size to get…

this is what I,m looking at…

-- Rick

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