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Forum topic by Manitario posted 1077 days ago 1412 views 1 time favorited 23 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Manitario

2264 posts in 1486 days


1077 days ago

Topic tags/keywords: handplane restoration

I’ve started to restore a couple of hand planes and I have a few questions for those of you with more experience with this. First plane is a Stanley Bailey #4 type 12. I’ve been attempting to flatten the sole; how flat is flat enough?? I have read that the important parts are to have the toe, mouth and heel all flat relative to each other. Currently it appears that there is a very slight convexity to the sole, ie. the toe and heel are 0.002” and 0.004” out compared to the mouth. The other question regarding this plane is the edge of the mouth is not perfectly even; the pic demonstrates it better

Does this matter or should I keep taking metal off?

Second plane is a Stanley Sweetheart #5; the sole is surprisingly flat, but has several scrapes in it, again the pic shows this better than I can describe it. Does this matter; should I work these out?

I’m excited to get these planes working and to start using handplanes in my shop.
Thanks!

-- Sometimes the creative process requires foul language. -- Charles Neil


23 replies so far

View Bertha's profile

Bertha

12951 posts in 1296 days


#1 posted 1077 days ago

0.002-.004 would be just fine in my shop, as would the irregular mouth. I’m interested to see the comments below. They will determine whether I’m 1) practical or 2) a slob. ;)

-- My dad and I built a 65 chev pick up.I killed trannys in that thing for some reason-Hog

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Manitario

2264 posts in 1486 days


#2 posted 1077 days ago

I’m all for being practical…as much fun as it is to sand a plane sole for hours…

-- Sometimes the creative process requires foul language. -- Charles Neil

View CharlieM1958's profile

CharlieM1958

15667 posts in 2821 days


#3 posted 1077 days ago

When it’s all uniformly shiny, it’s done. That’s my theory, anyway.

-- Charlie M. "Woodworking - patience = firewood"

View WayneC's profile

WayneC

12255 posts in 2700 days


#4 posted 1077 days ago

I would agree the sole is flat enough. Your flat to the thickness of a typical shaving… Which side of the photo of the mouth is the front edge? Top or bottom?

-- We must guard our enthusiasm as we would our life - James Krenov

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Manitario

2264 posts in 1486 days


#5 posted 1077 days ago

Hi Wayne; the front edge is bottom in the pic.

-- Sometimes the creative process requires foul language. -- Charles Neil

View WayneC's profile

WayneC

12255 posts in 2700 days


#6 posted 1077 days ago

Then I would say the mouth is fine…

-- We must guard our enthusiasm as we would our life - James Krenov

View Don W's profile

Don W

14659 posts in 1170 days


#7 posted 1077 days ago

I’ve never measured mine. What a novel idea. :-)

I hit it with the sand paper until it touches all the relevant parts, which is what Charlie said I believe.Scratches shouldn’t effect it rememberer some are completely corrugated.

My true test….how does it work?

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.com

View WayneC's profile

WayneC

12255 posts in 2700 days


#8 posted 1077 days ago

Also, are you flattening the sole with the frog and blade in?

-- We must guard our enthusiasm as we would our life - James Krenov

View Manitario's profile

Manitario

2264 posts in 1486 days


#9 posted 1077 days ago

yep, the frog/blade are in as I lap the sole.

-- Sometimes the creative process requires foul language. -- Charles Neil

View WayneC's profile

WayneC

12255 posts in 2700 days


#10 posted 1077 days ago

: ^ )

-- We must guard our enthusiasm as we would our life - James Krenov

View wingate_52's profile

wingate_52

219 posts in 1172 days


#11 posted 1077 days ago

Place the plane on a flat surface, glass, does it spin, can you get a thin feeler gauge of piece of paper between the 2 surfaces? Do they prduce good shavings? It is not about being shiny, but areas of the plane need to be flat relative to each other.

View canadianchips's profile

canadianchips

1831 posts in 1600 days


#12 posted 1076 days ago

Manitario. Sharpen the blade and make some shavings BEFORE you start lapping. Then make the sole shiny, flat or whatever YOU feel looks good. Make shavings again and compare the difference !
I think too many people are hyped up about the soles being flat, no grooves, etc. Here are 2 examples of planes that DO work. First is a compass plane, second a corrugated bottom plane.
In my own collection I remove the rust, clean the dirt off, if the jappaning is in poor shape I will repaint the bottom. My transitional I clean and sand the planes, put a new finish on the TOP and SIDES only, I wax the bottoms so they glide across the material smoothly. Repair any cracked or broken totes and knobs, shine up the brass parts and screws. HAVE FUN and Enjoy your restoration. (It’s satisfying and ADDICTIVE). I now look for the really roughest,poorest plane and see if I can bring it back to life. I never keep track of the time I spend doing it ! (I would never recover that time in money anyway) I retore them because “I CAN” and I enjoy it !

-- "My mission in life - make everyone smile !"

View CharlieM1958's profile

CharlieM1958

15667 posts in 2821 days


#13 posted 1076 days ago

” It is not about being shiny, but areas of the plane need to be flat relative to each other.”

No, it’s not about being shiny. But if you take a plane with a patina on the sole and start lapping it on a flat surface, looking at the sole intermittently, once everything is shiny, it is flat enough.

-- Charlie M. "Woodworking - patience = firewood"

View Bertha's profile

Bertha

12951 posts in 1296 days


#14 posted 1076 days ago

^agree with Charlie. Unless your plane’s been aggressively lapped on some kind of weird plane that’s not perpendicular to the sides; and everything’s touching down, you’re good to go (IMO).

-- My dad and I built a 65 chev pick up.I killed trannys in that thing for some reason-Hog

View wingate_52's profile

wingate_52

219 posts in 1172 days


#15 posted 1076 days ago

A couple of mine. Stanley (U.K.) Nos.4 and 4 1/2, Both with Bubinga woodware. Smoothcut Japanese laminated Blue steel blades with Quangsheng chipbreakers. I bought the No.4 1/2 in 1968. A few handles/totes and knobs under construction.

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