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Forum topic by klinkman posted 10-14-2018 06:19 PM 412 views 0 times favorited 18 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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klinkman

14 posts in 51 days


10-14-2018 06:19 PM

Topic tags/keywords: finishing mistake

Thanks to those who chimed in on my earlier post about my walnut sofa table top. I wrapped up the construction this week and really like how this project is progressing. However I’m having another heart-burn moment.

For finishing, I’ve progressively sanded to 220 grit. I tested a couple of different combinations, and then settled on minwax “pre stain conditioner” and minwax “special walnut 224” stain. I really like how it’s come out, the grain an character are popping and it’s a great color. My idea at this point was just to apply a paste wax finish. I applied a single coat. The surface has turned luxuriant and silky smooth.

The problem I’m having is this: Before the stain was dry, a wayward bead of sweat fell on to the top. The piece was angled, so it rolled and made about a 4” streak that I didn’t notice until the next day. So sanded and followed up with a light reapplication of stain. Sanding just basically dulled the finish in the affected area. I thought covering it with wax might bring the luster back. It didn’t and I’ve got a mark now.

It’s not so noticeable looking straight down:

But it is when the light hits it:

My idea now is to just strip the top back down to bare wood and simply refinish the top. The question is what’s the best way to remove the finish?

I’m thinking mineral spirits to remove the wax, then either chemical stripper or sanding (or both) for the color? How about the sanding sealer, does that have to be fully removed? I’ve searched and can’t really find something leading in the right direction here. Thanks in advance, any thoughts are appreciated.

-- Klinkman, newbie


18 replies so far

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klinkman

14 posts in 51 days


#1 posted 10-14-2018 10:40 PM

Well, the answer is sanding is simpler than I expected. The finish doesn’t penetrate very deeply.

-- Klinkman, newbie

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OSU55

1927 posts in 2165 days


#2 posted 10-15-2018 12:04 PM

I dont consider paste wax a finish. Not much protection from anything. A very easy finish – mw poly thinned 1:1, keep the surface wet for 10 min, wipe most of it off. Repeat, as many times as you want. Not as good as a thicker film but will be much better than just wax.

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klinkman

14 posts in 51 days


#3 posted 10-15-2018 03:49 PM

Thanks OSU55. While I appreciate wax is not as durable as a poly coat, I consider this piece a bit of fine furniture, not for setting a wet drink glass on. :) Not that it ever won’t get a wet drink, but the idea of a simple to execute, nice looking finish that allows the feel of the wood (over a plastic barrier) was a reasonable trade off over durability for my first real piece of furniture. This will be a low traffic display piece, and yes, I understand it will require occasional refreshing. Appreciate your input and finishing technique, and will certainly try it down the road.

-- Klinkman, newbie

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Rich

3759 posts in 765 days


#4 posted 10-15-2018 04:01 PM

To say that wax isn’t a finish flies in the face of every finishing book I have. While being at the bottom of the list for durability and protection, it’s certainly a suitable finish for pieces that will be used like klinkman just described.

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

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BroncoBrian

831 posts in 2134 days


#5 posted 10-15-2018 04:07 PM

I love using wax as a finish. There are some great waxes available with color in them and they hold up well. I’ve used a dark wax for a sofa table recently and it was one of the most forgiving finishes I’ve used.

Nice work. Amazing how easy a ROS takes your finish off! I 1/8th chamfer on the table would look great.

-- I think they could take sesame seeds off the market and I wouldn't even care. I can't imagine five years from now saying, "Man, remember sesame seeds? What happened? All the buns are blank."

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klinkman

14 posts in 51 days


#6 posted 10-15-2018 04:24 PM



Nice work. Amazing how easy a ROS takes your finish off! I 1/8th chamfer on the table would look great.

- BroncoBrian

Thanks Brian. 1/8” chamfer—exactly what I did after I got the finish off! Great minds. . . . ;)

-- Klinkman, newbie

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BroncoBrian

831 posts in 2134 days


#7 posted 10-15-2018 04:38 PM

Nice. For some reason, the light plays off that angle nicely on Walnut. And Purpleheart. It is a bit more modern.

-- I think they could take sesame seeds off the market and I wouldn't even care. I can't imagine five years from now saying, "Man, remember sesame seeds? What happened? All the buns are blank."

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bondogaposis

5055 posts in 2527 days


#8 posted 10-15-2018 04:45 PM

You found out how un-durable a wax finish is, a drip sweat caused problems, sand back and apply some poly. Table tops see all kinds abuse, you’ll be refinishing that frequently.

-- Bondo Gaposis

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klinkman

14 posts in 51 days


#9 posted 10-15-2018 05:17 PM

You found out how un-durable a wax finish is, a drip sweat caused problems.

Sweat hit the stain, before the wax.

-- Klinkman, newbie

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Rich

3759 posts in 765 days


#10 posted 10-15-2018 05:24 PM


You found out how un-durable a wax finish is, a drip sweat caused problems.

Sweat hit the stain, before the wax.

- klinkman

Besides, wax is the easiest topcoat to repair. Applying a fresh coat amalgamates with the previous coat creating one coat. There’s no such thing as wax build up.

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

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bondogaposis

5055 posts in 2527 days


#11 posted 10-15-2018 05:34 PM

Besides, wax is the easiest topcoat to repair.

True, but it is not much of a barrier, once the wood underneath swells from contact with water, the repair becomes not so easy.

-- Bondo Gaposis

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BroncoBrian

831 posts in 2134 days


#12 posted 10-15-2018 05:35 PM


You found out how un-durable a wax finish is, a drip sweat caused problems.

Sweat hit the stain, before the wax.

- klinkman

Besides, wax is the easiest topcoat to repair. Applying a fresh coat amalgamates with the previous coat creating one coat. There s no such thing as wax build up.

- Rich

He did not read carefully. You can get this stuff at Ace, it works great. Dark/Medium/Clear: https://www.amyhowardhome.com/products/dark-wax

-- I think they could take sesame seeds off the market and I wouldn't even care. I can't imagine five years from now saying, "Man, remember sesame seeds? What happened? All the buns are blank."

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Rich

3759 posts in 765 days


#13 posted 10-15-2018 06:09 PM


Besides, wax is the easiest topcoat to repair.

True, but it is not much of a barrier, once the wood underneath swells from contact with water, the repair becomes not so easy.

- bondogaposis

Read the thread. Water isn’t an issue in his case.

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

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OSU55

1927 posts in 2165 days


#14 posted 10-15-2018 06:24 PM



To say that wax isn t a finish flies in the face of every finishing book I have. While being at the bottom of the list for durability and protection, it s certainly a suitable finish for pieces that will be used like klinkman just described.

- Rich


Never said books dont consider it a finish, I stated I dont, since it provides about zero protection. For something that will never be touched, or at the other end of the spectrum some “chic” distressed beat up piece, ok. IMO a sofa table will be touched and have things placed on it, even in a showroom, therefore a different choice should be made. If the op wants to continue dealing with issues like he already has, thats his choice, but it would not be mine.

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bondogaposis

5055 posts in 2527 days


#15 posted 10-15-2018 06:47 PM


Besides, wax is the easiest topcoat to repair.

True, but it is not much of a barrier, once the wood underneath swells from contact with water, the repair becomes not so easy.

- bondogaposis

Read the thread. Water isn t an issue in his case.

- Rich

Not that it ever won’t get a wet drink,

From the OP, I predict just wax won’t hold up.

-- Bondo Gaposis

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