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Removing Wood burn in grooves

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Forum topic by EdsCustomWoodCrafts posted 10-10-2018 05:02 AM 360 views 0 times favorited 11 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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EdsCustomWoodCrafts

843 posts in 1489 days


10-10-2018 05:02 AM

Topic tags/keywords: wood burn trivet router burn inset grooves

Hey everyone

I need to resolve a problem that I have.. I am making trivets using a plunge router and the trivet has inset grooves criss-crossing the top and bottom faces and I have a good bit of wood burn and it is proving very difficult in getting into the spaces at the end of the grooves

Does anyone have suggestions I looked online but all the solutions I am find can be applied to outside edges and nothing about inside groove edges

-- Thanks Ed “A bad day woodworking is better than a good day working. ~Author unknown”


11 replies so far

View Lazyman's profile

Lazyman

2526 posts in 1533 days


#1 posted 10-10-2018 05:23 AM

Are you asking how to prevent the burning or how to clean it up on the inside of the grooves?

Some woods are just prone to burning. Make sure the bit is clean and sharp. You might try adjusting the speed if your router is variable speed.

As for cleaning up the burn marks. A Dremel with sanding drum is what I would try.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

View EdsCustomWoodCrafts's profile

EdsCustomWoodCrafts

843 posts in 1489 days


#2 posted 10-10-2018 06:05 AM


Are you asking how to prevent the burning or how to clean it up on the inside of the grooves?

Some woods are just prone to burning. Make sure the bit is clean and sharp. You might try adjusting the speed if your router is variable speed.

As for cleaning up the burn marks. A Dremel with sanding drum is what I would try.

- Lazyman

Thanks for responding yes more on how to clean up the burn .. I generally always get a little but since I’m selling these I don’t want any.. I was going to go that route. Thanks again

-- Thanks Ed “A bad day woodworking is better than a good day working. ~Author unknown”

View John Smith's profile

John Smith

1374 posts in 309 days


#3 posted 10-10-2018 12:11 PM

looking at your custom jig and the assembly line you have going in your profile,
you are doing a great job !!
what kind of plywood are you using ??

I would ask how old is your bit and what kind of flutes does it have
for feedback on how to prevent future issues.
try taking smaller bites of wood vs doing it all in one swoop.
is this the only one burned this bad so far? or do you have a few to clean up.
and I agree – if you are going to sell them, they need to be perfect.

do you have a dremel tool with a sanding disk ?
is it possible to re-route that part maybe 1/32” deeper with a new bit ??

.

-- I started out with nothing in life ~ and still have most of it left.

View torus's profile

torus

156 posts in 559 days


#4 posted 10-10-2018 12:41 PM

I would choose easy way out – with torch!
I think light burn treatment for trivet is quite appropriate.
BTW I like the pattern. Are you using any kind of jig for it?

-- "It's getting better..." - put this on my RIP stone!

View EdsCustomWoodCrafts's profile

EdsCustomWoodCrafts

843 posts in 1489 days


#5 posted 10-10-2018 01:23 PM



looking at your custom jig and the assembly line you have going in your profile,
you are doing a great job !!
what kind of plywood are you using ??

I would ask how old is your bit and what kind of flutes does it have
for feedback on how to prevent future issues.
try taking smaller bites of wood vs doing it all in one swoop.
is this the only one burned this bad so far? or do you have a few to clean up.
and I agree – if you are going to sell them, they need to be perfect.

do you have a dremel tool with a sanding disk ?
is it possible to re-route that part maybe 1/32” deeper with a new bit ??

.

- John Smith

Thanks John

Well the router bit is brand soaking new and this trivet was its first project !!! It’s a down spiral bit 1/2” shank.

This was only a prototype I will not be using plywood for production I’m actually going to see what looks good st the lumber yard today, I think it was birch plywood (not Baltic birch) Home Depot stuff

-- Thanks Ed “A bad day woodworking is better than a good day working. ~Author unknown”

View DS's profile

DS

3001 posts in 2566 days


#6 posted 10-10-2018 01:44 PM

Other than tedious hand sanding, or taking another light finishing pass with the router, I am unaware of another way to clean up this burn.

Better, is to avoid the burn altogether.

Maybe you already know this, but, it probably bears repeating; Understanding why you get the burn on your router is to understand chip loads.

The waste chips that your router produces carries off heat from the cut with them.
If the chips are small and few, due to too fast rpm’s, or too slow feed rate, then the heat stays in the bit and you get burns.

So, if you have a variable speed router, slowing down the rpm’s will help reduce burning, as well as avoiding feeding too slowly.

Hope this helps.

-- "Hard work is not defined by the difficulty of the task as much as a person's desire to perform it.", DS251

View Kazooman's profile

Kazooman

1145 posts in 2098 days


#7 posted 10-10-2018 01:59 PM


looking at your custom jig and the assembly line you have going in your profile,
you are doing a great job !!
what kind of plywood are you using ??

I would ask how old is your bit and what kind of flutes does it have
for feedback on how to prevent future issues.
try taking smaller bites of wood vs doing it all in one swoop.
is this the only one burned this bad so far? or do you have a few to clean up.
and I agree – if you are going to sell them, they need to be perfect.

do you have a dremel tool with a sanding disk ?
is it possible to re-route that part maybe 1/32” deeper with a new bit ??

.

- John Smith

Thanks John

Well the router bit is brand soaking new and this trivet was its first project !!! It’s a down spiral bit 1/2” shank.

This was only a prototype I will not be using plywood for production I’m actually going to see what looks good st the lumber yard today, I think it was birch plywood (not Baltic birch) Home Depot stuff

- EdsCustomWoodCrafts

I would wait and see what your results are with the actual wood you will be using. Some species are more prone to burning that others. With the plywood test piece some of the problem might be due to the glue between laminations.

View torus's profile

torus

156 posts in 559 days


#8 posted 10-10-2018 03:38 PM

Ed. I sow your router jig for trivets in the Projects. Thanks.

-- "It's getting better..." - put this on my RIP stone!

View Lazyman's profile

Lazyman

2526 posts in 1533 days


#9 posted 10-10-2018 03:53 PM


I would wait and see what your results are with the actual wood you will be using. Some species are more prone to burning that others. With the plywood test piece some of the problem might be due to the glue between laminations.

- Kazooman

+1. I didn’t realize that was in plywood. I have had the resin sort of melt and burn like that when using a router bit. The bit will often be covered with the resin afterwards as well. Some of the dark areas on the flat areas might actually just be resin too.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

View ClammyBallz's profile

ClammyBallz

447 posts in 1282 days


#10 posted 10-10-2018 04:14 PM

First, I would upgrade to a Whiteside bit, those bits took care of my burning issues.

If you still run into problems, and you’re trying to make these in mass quantity, I’d set up two stages or two routers. One to take out the bulk with a thicker collar and set a little higher. The second one set with the correct collar for the jig and set lower while using a better bit. Make sure you let them cool off between the two stages.

View Kazooman's profile

Kazooman

1145 posts in 2098 days


#11 posted 10-11-2018 01:10 PM

I thought about this a little more. You indicated that you are using a down spiral bit. I assume that was intended to give you the cleanest edge at the surface. However, the down spiral is not going to help clear the debris from the groove as you rout it. A plain vanilla 1/2” bit or even an upspiral might give you better results.

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