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Water based poly and wiping

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Forum topic by Everett1 posted 08-15-2011 01:39 AM 2895 views 0 times favorited 11 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Everett1

208 posts in 1230 days


08-15-2011 01:39 AM

Never used waterbased anything

So I know a loved varnish is 50/50 wipe on oil based poly and mineral spirits

Can you do the same 50/50 thing with waterbased poly and water?

Thanks in advanced

Ev

-- Ev in Framingham, MA


11 replies so far

View CharlieM1958's profile

CharlieM1958

15706 posts in 2915 days


#1 posted 08-15-2011 03:27 AM

I tried it and didn’t get good results. Maybe someone else has had a better experience.

-- Charlie M. "Woodworking - patience = firewood"

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Milo

862 posts in 2015 days


#2 posted 08-15-2011 03:40 AM

You have to be really patient with water based poly. It’s been a while since I did refinishing with it, but I am almost positive that 50/50 is WAY too thin.

What are the instructions on the container? You need to follow them religiously. The plus about water based is that the turn around between coats is a whole lot faster than traditional. Then negative is you need to leave the piece you finish alone for a lot longer than traditional finish. The microfibers in the finish need time to lace up and align to make a strong finish.

It’s a lot easier to work with, MUCH easier to clean, and not nearly as toxic.

Good luck,

Milo

-- Beer, Beer, Thank God for Beer. It's my way of keeping my mind fresh and clear...

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Everett1

208 posts in 1230 days


#3 posted 08-15-2011 03:47 AM

I haven’t bought anything yet, was likely going to go with the GF brand though

-- Ev in Framingham, MA

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RTim

60 posts in 1389 days


#4 posted 08-15-2011 03:48 AM

I never tried wiping with water-based finishes. If you want to experiment with a user-friendly wipe on finish, try shellac. You can thin it with denatured alcohol, it wipes on easily and clean up isn’t terrible. Shellac is also rather forgiving…it’s its own solvent so if a coat gets a little heavy or runs in places it can be corrected by the next coat.

My mother weaves Nantucket baskets and uses shellac as a finish. She wipes it on with a paper towel of all things but it comes out fantastic.

-- Tim from MA -- "Well done is better than well said." - Benjamin Franlin

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Dark_Lightning

1771 posts in 1805 days


#5 posted 08-15-2011 04:08 AM

I made a Baltic birch plywood box for my wife in ‘97. I used a cotton cloth (an old handkerchief) and Minwax satin poly at about 50% to wipe on the finish. Came out as smooth as a moth’s nose. Old hankie means no lint. Each coat was dry in about 1/2 hour. Wipe it and leave it alone until it’s ready for the next coat. Repeated wiping before the intermediate coat is cured will trash the finish. It builds slowly, but looks really nice.

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Everett1

208 posts in 1230 days


#6 posted 08-15-2011 05:52 AM

Thanks guys I’ll just have to give a try
RTim, where in MA

I’m in Framingham

Ev

-- Ev in Framingham, MA

View Lee Barker's profile

Lee Barker

2169 posts in 1547 days


#7 posted 08-15-2011 06:53 AM

I am in agreement that a 50/50 wipe on is not recommended. In fact, I think the labels I have read say something like, “thinning not recommended.”

The key thing in your transition, Ev, is to approach it with an open mind; it is not really kin to what you’re accustomed to using.

I have read that coarse plastic bristles are recommended, but I have got better results with a more expensive fine-bristled brush (made for latex products).

Recently I ordered purpose-made brushes from toolsforwoodworking.com and will report when I get a chance to use them.

+1 for Milo’s comment: You can flat sand etc. if you are patient with WB products. Pick a brand, introduce yourself, use it every chance you get (and can concoct) and you will become good friends.

Kindly,

Lee

-- "...in his brain, which is as dry as the remainder biscuit after a voyage, he hath strange places cramm'd with observation, the which he vents in mangled forms." --Shakespeare, "As You Like It"

View RTim's profile

RTim

60 posts in 1389 days


#8 posted 08-15-2011 03:28 PM

Hi Everett, I’m in Brockton.

-- Tim from MA -- "Well done is better than well said." - Benjamin Franlin

View Steven H's profile

Steven H

1114 posts in 1756 days


#9 posted 08-15-2011 03:50 PM

If the instructions says do not thin, then do not thin. Because it can screw the chemistry of the product.
Waterborne products usually comes out the can thin. I usually thin it 10% if i really need to.

View Milo's profile

Milo

862 posts in 2015 days


#10 posted 08-16-2011 03:39 PM

From my experience you use a small amount of DI or appropriate water. Once again, read the instructions on the can. NOT TAP WATER!!! CHLORINE IS A NO NO! It will thoroughly screw up your finish!

I used to use one of the green foam brushes from with the styrofoam handle you can buy at the Big Box stores. One shot only on those, and have multiple.

Also, you won’t hear this a lot, but have a hair dryer on hand. On low setting, with no heat. Sometimes you can have trouble with foaming, and on a table top you can use the dryer to gently blow across the surface after laying down your finish. It will pop every bubble you have. ;)

Hope this all helps.

-- Beer, Beer, Thank God for Beer. It's my way of keeping my mind fresh and clear...

View Howie's profile

Howie

2656 posts in 1619 days


#11 posted 08-19-2011 02:58 PM

Thin—-don’t thin….new Wood magazine says thin oil poly. Who do I believe? I have to lean on people from here like Lee who somehow I think has done this more than someone who writes a mag article.
I don’t like the water based(although it won’t be long before that is all you can get…thanks EPA..duh)

-- Life is good.

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