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A crack in a mahogany top

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Forum topic by bluejazz posted 08-14-2011 11:51 PM 1513 views 0 times favorited 6 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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bluejazz

56 posts in 2253 days


08-14-2011 11:51 PM

Topic tags/keywords: mahogany crack finishing

I have been working on a mahogany top; finished the glue up and starting sanding and then I noticed this crack developing near the end grain. I’m not sure if I caused it with the block plane or if it was due to internal stresses or what.

But I am not sure if I should glue it
- epoxy?
- Wood glue? And if so, how can I get the glue in the crack?

Some other tactic?

Anybody got any ideas how best to handle it?

Thanks for any input.

-- I'm 58. In my mind, I still feel 28. Until I do something physical; then I feel 78.


6 replies so far

View David Kirtley's profile

David Kirtley

1286 posts in 2464 days


#1 posted 08-15-2011 01:19 AM

No, you didn’t cause it. It is a called a check. It is from internal stresses from drying.

It might say there forever or it might expand. It also might close up as the wood moisture stabilizes. You are not going to fix it but you can fill it. You might have to come back and do it again if it expands further. If you trim it off, it may not matter as the stresses are not just in that one point. You could do a breadboard end to cover it. You could take it off, rip it into pieces and glue it up as a panel. It is just a way of life when working with wood.

-- Woodworking shouldn't cost a fortune: http://lowbudgetwoodworker.blogspot.com/

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bluejazz

56 posts in 2253 days


#2 posted 08-15-2011 02:36 PM

Thanks, that is good to know. I guess I have been lucky to date; this is the first time I have run into this.

-- I'm 58. In my mind, I still feel 28. Until I do something physical; then I feel 78.

View Nomad62's profile

Nomad62

726 posts in 2424 days


#3 posted 08-15-2011 11:20 PM

I’d let it sit in your shop or house for a while before doing anything to let it dry as much as it will before moving forward. That is a crack from shrinkage due to moisture loss, and it will travel up the wood as it dries further. It was probably there when you bought it, you just couldn’t see it as it was still drying; there are other cracks visable in the photo, more may show up; I’d give it at least a month. Filling them is a great solution provided they don’t get too big, check out your local woodworking store for available products; they are coming up with new things all the time. Lastly, wood from the center-most part of a tree is most likely to do that; it’s hard to tell for sure from the photo, but if the center of the board is cut right near the center of the tree (the widest quarter sawn piece possible) as determined by the growth rings circling around a barely missing center then this problem is one to be wary of. Letting it set and acclimate in your home for a while is your best defense. Best of luck.

-- Power tools put us ahead of the monkeys

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bluejazz

56 posts in 2253 days


#4 posted 08-16-2011 02:12 PM

Thanks for the advice. There is no rush on this, this is a replacement top so I have the time to wait. I appreciate the insight and advice from from you both.

-- I'm 58. In my mind, I still feel 28. Until I do something physical; then I feel 78.

View TimV's profile

TimV

44 posts in 1974 days


#5 posted 08-17-2011 11:07 PM

How long has the wood been in your shop? It might be stable by now.

Do you have any extra length available on the panel? I usually glue up my panels oversized and cut off for square but you could utilize that extra length to cut the checks off.

Was that the end of the board as you received it? I usually cut off at least 2-3 inches from the end of every board I bring home. You always have to look for checking at the ends and cut it off first.

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bluejazz

56 posts in 2253 days


#6 posted 08-18-2011 12:18 AM

Tim,

It has been in my shop only a week or so. I guess I have been living large and lucky up to now. I have read you need to let it sit and equalize to your shop before you work the board; but I had never had a problem till now.

Like you I glued up my pane oversize; it was only when I cut to length that I saw the check.

I had hand cut over length prior to glue up, and had cut to final size (from both ends) before I saw the crack.

-- I'm 58. In my mind, I still feel 28. Until I do something physical; then I feel 78.

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