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DW 735 Blower Is Strong!

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Forum topic by Kazooman posted 10-02-2018 10:49 PM 546 views 0 times favorited 14 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Kazooman

1217 posts in 2129 days


10-02-2018 10:49 PM

Went to my basement shop and noticed an area on the floor covered with small maple and walnut wood chips. Strange! I had planed the first glue-up of some Woodwhisperer’s end grain cutting boards the evening before, but how did chips get on the floor near my router table? I checked my dust collector (1 1/2 Hp Delta 50-760 with a Wynn filter) and it seemed to be working (at least the bottom bag was inflating). On further investigation, I discovered that there was a clog right at the Y-fitting that adapts the 5” blower input to two 4” inputs. This has never happened before.

The first picture shows the inside of the Y-fitting. It has two cross members that must serve to stop large pieces from entering the impeller:

The next picture is the “bird’s nest of planer debris that I pulled out of the Y-fitting:

Even with this restriction I could still feel inward airflow from the planer to the collector. However, the blower on the DW 735 is well known for being a beast. It was more than up to the task to overwhelm the dust collector and send planer debris upstream through my very short DC manifold. The blast gate to the router table was slightly ajar and the chips exited through there and onto the floor.

Mystery solved and a testament to the power of the 735 blower. All DC plumbing cleared out and I am back in business.

I should note that the debris in the photo was from a prior run of the planer on a glue up for some maple and purpleheart boards. I like to make one long glue up like shown in the photo below and then slice off the individual pieces for the final glue up. I can get three or four boards out of one initial glue up. Note: I only plane the initial long-grain glue up. I never plane the final end grain boards. That is left to the drum sander.


14 replies so far

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TungOil

1040 posts in 672 days


#1 posted 10-02-2018 10:53 PM

This is exactly why DeWalt tech support recommends not hooking the 735 up to a DC system. I run mine straight into a trash can cyclone and use an old DC filter bag on the exhaust to catch the fines. Works like a champ.

-- The optimist says "the glass is half full". The pessimist says "the glass is half empty". The engineer says "the glass is twice as big as it needs to be"

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Kazooman

1217 posts in 2129 days


#2 posted 10-02-2018 11:04 PM



This is exactly why DeWalt tech support recommends not hooking the 735 up to a DC system. I run mine straight into a trash can cyclone and use an old DC filter bag on the exhaust to catch the fines. Works like a champ.

- TungOil

I believe that may be an urban myth. From the Dewalt 735 Instruction Manual:

Fan-Assisted Chip Ejection System Your planer is equipped with a fan-assisted chip ejection system to aid in exhausting chips from the unit. The fan-assisted chip ejection system will work in conjunction with independent dust collection systems. NOTE: It is not recommended that a shop vac be connected to the DW735. The capacity of most vacs does not support the volume of chips ejected during planing. The vacuum hose may clog stopping the flow of chips

It specifically states that the 735 will work in conjunction with independent dust collection systems. It recommends NOT using a shop vac. My 1 1/2 Hp collector with less than six feet of total 4” duct from the planer to the collector is not a shop vac.

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Kazooman

1217 posts in 2129 days


#3 posted 10-02-2018 11:05 PM

This is exactly why DeWalt tech support recommends not hooking the 735 up to a DC system. I run mine straight into a trash can cyclone and use an old DC filter bag on the exhaust to catch the fines. Works like a champ.

- TungOil

I believe that may be an urban myth. From the Dewalt 735 Instruction Manual:

Fan-Assisted Chip Ejection System Your planer is equipped with a fan-assisted chip ejection system to aid in exhausting chips from the unit. The fan-assisted chip ejection system will work in conjunction with independent dust collection systems. NOTE: It is not recommended that a shop vac be connected to the DW735. The capacity of most vacs does not support the volume of chips ejected during planing. The vacuum hose may clog stopping the flow of chips

It specifically states that the 735 will work in conjunction with independent dust collection systems. It recommends NOT using a shop vac. My 1 1/2 Hp collector with less than six feet of total 4” duct from the planer to the collector is not a shop vac. The two units have worked well for several years.

- Kazooman

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TungOil

1040 posts in 672 days


#4 posted 10-02-2018 11:12 PM

I agree that’s what the manual says, but DeWalt tech support told me what I stated above about 2 years ago when I called them about the same issue- I had dust coming out all over the place. I’m runnning a Powermatic 1.75 hp DC through 6” and 4” ductwork and that silly little planer was still able to overwhelm it!

-- The optimist says "the glass is half full". The pessimist says "the glass is half empty". The engineer says "the glass is twice as big as it needs to be"

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Kazooman

1217 posts in 2129 days


#5 posted 10-02-2018 11:53 PM

I think my recent problem had a lot to do with the piece I was planing earlier. It was a glued up piece similar to the one in the last picture I posted. Notice in the “bird’s nest” photo how all of the pieces are long strands. That is not the typical output from my planer. With the the cutting board glue up the planer was cutting out pieces between the glue lines. I think that is a testament to my nice, sharp planer knives! The blow-by debris on the floor was small chunks, as usual. I don’t recall ever seeing such long strands in the dust collector bag. Must have been something about those specific pieces of wood.

I am also questioning the need for the cross bars in the dust collector Y fitting. It can be hooked up to my planer, jointer, router table, band saw, and drum sander. I don’t see how anything that could damage the impeller could get through. Maybe time to eliminate the potential problem with a few snips of a pair of cutting pliers.

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TungOil

1040 posts in 672 days


#6 posted 10-03-2018 02:17 AM

Agree on the cross bars. Unless they are needed for strength I’d cut them out to prevent clogging.

-- The optimist says "the glass is half full". The pessimist says "the glass is half empty". The engineer says "the glass is twice as big as it needs to be"

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TheFridge

10512 posts in 1663 days


#7 posted 10-03-2018 02:31 AM

Cut em. Hf DCs have similar. They were cut out before the first run.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

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Kazooman

1217 posts in 2129 days


#8 posted 10-03-2018 11:21 AM

Thanks guys, the bars will meet their demise this morning. I probably saw them when I assembled the collector, but never thought much about them. They are of no use in my application.

View Gene Howe's profile

Gene Howe

10988 posts in 3606 days


#9 posted 10-03-2018 12:02 PM

Mine is connected via a 4’ long, 4” dia. hose to a dedicated 1 hp collector with a …I’m guessing…20 gallon bag. I’ve not had any clogging problems, at all. Sometimes, the collector isn’t on for a small job, still no clogging. I’ve never checked but the blower seems to push the shavings through the hose, ok.

-- Gene 'The true soldier fights not because he hates what is in front of him, but because he loves what is behind him.' G. K. Chesterton

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Blindhog

89 posts in 1226 days


#10 posted 10-03-2018 01:50 PM

I have my 735 hooked up to a ClearVue 5 hp DC system and have never had any problem with clogging out of the planer; or any other machine for that matter. I would certainly imagine the blower could overcome a shop vac type system and smaller units as well.

-- Don't let perfection get in the way of plenty good enough

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garageking

35 posts in 627 days


#11 posted 10-03-2018 02:40 PM

Mine is connected to a Powermatic 1.75hp DC with 4” hose and works really well. I once forgot to hook up the DC and it made quite a mess. I must say I was quite surprised at the power of the 735 blower.

-- David, Kentucky

View EarlS's profile

EarlS

1767 posts in 2525 days


#12 posted 10-03-2018 04:27 PM

I use a 30 gal garbage can with the plastic in/out top you can buy from Rockler when I run the 735 with a hose running from there to the DC inlet. I have to strap the plastic top down or the 735 blower lifts it up and I have a pile of fine dust around the can. The nice thing about this set up is that I can check the can frequently and empty it so I don’t have to worry about clogging the DC inlet. The pressure drop in the garbage can is easily overcome with the 735 blower and the DC gets all of the fine dust.

Dewalt customer service told me the blower puts out 195 cfm but didn’t have a pressure to go with it. Here is a formula for figuring static pressure: square root ( in WC) x cross sectional area of the pipe (ft^2) 4005 = cfm.

Using a 2” outlet (0.0218 ft^2 xsect area), at 195 cfm, the blower pressure is 4.98”WC

4.98” WC = (195 cfm/(4005 0.0218 ft^2))^2

That is a powerful little blower. You can also use this formula to figure out the pressure on a shop vac.

-- Earl "I'm a pessamist - generally that increases the chance that things will turn out better than expected"

View Jim Finn's profile

Jim Finn

2684 posts in 3099 days


#13 posted 10-04-2018 12:05 AM



I think my recent problem had a lot to do with the piece I was planing earlier. It was a glued up piece similar to the one in the last picture I posted. Notice in the “bird s nest” photo how all of the pieces are long strands. That is not the typical output from my planer. With the the cutting board glue up the planer was cutting out pieces between the glue lines. I think that is a testament to my nice, sharp planer knives! The blow-by debris on the floor was small chunks, as usual. I don t recall ever seeing such long strands in the dust collector bag. Must have been something about those specific pieces of wood.

I am also questioning the need for the cross bars in the dust collector Y fitting. It can be hooked up to my planer, jointer, router table, band saw, and drum sander. I don t see how anything that could damage the impeller could get through. Maybe time to eliminate the potential problem with a few snips of a pair of cutting pliers.

- Kazooman

The long strands you may encounter happens when the wood is put through the planer 90 Degrees wrong and are not planing with the grain. I had this happen to me. I have may 735 connected to my 6” dust collection system and it works well.

-- No PHD just a DD214 Website> craftingcouple.com

View Kazooman's profile

Kazooman

1217 posts in 2129 days


#14 posted 10-04-2018 11:35 AM

I think my recent problem had a lot to do with the piece I was planing earlier. It was a glued up piece similar to the one in the last picture I posted. Notice in the “bird s nest” photo how all of the pieces are long strands. That is not the typical output from my planer. With the the cutting board glue up the planer was cutting out pieces between the glue lines. I think that is a testament to my nice, sharp planer knives! The blow-by debris on the floor was small chunks, as usual. I don t recall ever seeing such long strands in the dust collector bag. Must have been something about those specific pieces of wood.

I am also questioning the need for the cross bars in the dust collector Y fitting. It can be hooked up to my planer, jointer, router table, band saw, and drum sander. I don t see how anything that could damage the impeller could get through. Maybe time to eliminate the potential problem with a few snips of a pair of cutting pliers.

- Kazooman

The long strands you may encounter happens when the wood is put through the planer 90 Degrees wrong and are not planing with the grain. I had this happen to me. I have may 735 connected to my 6” dust collection system and it works well.

- Jim Finn

Good thought and I can see how what you describe would lead to such a result. However, in this instance there is no question that the wood was run though the planer in the long grain direction. Look at the final picture I posted. That is how I always make these boards and that is how the batch that generated the nest was constructed.

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