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Forum topic by spunwood posted 1105 days ago 924 views 0 times favorited 11 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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spunwood

1194 posts in 1462 days


1105 days ago

Topic tags/keywords: question

Well, if you read my last forum, you will know that I have been in the process of getting mold out of the kitchen. The mold is gone, but I have taken this opportunity to get rid of the pressed-board countertops.

I am going to edge glue oak board for a brick like layout.

I had a few questions. Love to have some imput:

1. I was thinking of making the countertop© 1” thick. Is that to thin?

2.I want to use reclaimed barnwood and just epoxy fill the nail holes. If that will work, what kind of epoxy can I use?

3.Some of the boards have hairline cracks. Should I just select different board or epoxy them? Or is there a finish that will fill those cracks?

4.I am thinking of a waterlox or citrus tungue oil finish? Any thoughts?

Thanks for taking the time to look,

Brandon

-- I came, I was conquered, I was born again. ἵνα ὦσιν ἓν


11 replies so far

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spunwood

1194 posts in 1462 days


#1 posted 1105 days ago

Any thoughts on these questions?

Also, how would you mate the cabinet tops where they meet in the corner? One big miter? How would one make sure the miter worked?

Any other ideas?

-- I came, I was conquered, I was born again. ἵνα ὦσιν ἓν

View joey bealis's profile

joey bealis

177 posts in 1132 days


#2 posted 1105 days ago

OK lets see if i can answer some of your questions. 1. using 1” thick is possible but you will need something under them like a piece of mdf or birch ply, but you may still have movement problems. 2. They make a epoxy for bar tops but i cant remember brand at this time. 3. if top is stable the bar top epoxy will fill cracks and holes.

-- http://reclaimedbuilding.blogspot.com/

View gabriel's profile

gabriel

9 posts in 1232 days


#3 posted 1105 days ago

are you thinking that this will be a 1” thick laminate or, – what are your construction thoughts?

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Dallas

2866 posts in 1113 days


#4 posted 1105 days ago

I’ve used System Three bartop coating w/ mirror coat for countertops, and was well pleased with it, although it’s not meant to be chopped on with knives and other sharp objects. The coating will take care of many small cracks in the wood, but I would fill with a normal epoxy filler on any large cracks, remembering to put a backer on it so you aren’t trying to fill a bottomless hole.

http://www.systemthree.com/projects-bartop-coating.asp

Miters can be be made to match by making a rough miter, then tieing the two pieces together with a wooden block, then using a circular saw and a straight edge to cut down the crack between the two pieces.
(I would do this before installation, it’s a bugger getting the circular saw into the corner, don’t ask how I know!)

-- Improvise.... Adapt...... Overcome!

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spunwood

1194 posts in 1462 days


#5 posted 1105 days ago

Thanks guys:

Joey: would the problem be that it is too thick or too thin?

Gabriel: I am taking 2ft by 1.5-2” pieces and gluing them like this:

Dal: That is hysterical, and a great idea. It is just like using a framing or miter clamp!

What happens if epoxy needs repair…or does it?

-- I came, I was conquered, I was born again. ἵνα ὦσιν ἓν

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Dallas

2866 posts in 1113 days


#6 posted 1105 days ago

”What happens if epoxy needs repair…or does it?”

If you are asking about the bartop coating, when my ex-wife used the butcher knife on it to cut up some venison, I just sanded it down to a feather finish and recoated.
We got divorced shortly after that, so I don’t know how it looks after 12 years.

-- Improvise.... Adapt...... Overcome!

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spunwood

1194 posts in 1462 days


#7 posted 1105 days ago

Maybe I’ll just screw some cleats underneath it to minimize movement.

Could I put cleats along each miters’ bottom and squeeze the cleats together to “seal’ the miter?

-- I came, I was conquered, I was born again. ἵνα ὦσιν ἓν

View Manitario's profile

Manitario

2299 posts in 1509 days


#8 posted 1105 days ago

are you thinking of doing something similar to woodblock flooring? If so, there are a couple of LJ’s that have a lot of experience with this type of construction and finishing methods. I figure if it works (and looks great) on a floor, it could work well for a counter. I can’t remember off the top of my head their names, might try searching for them. I look forward to seeing the finished project!

-- Sometimes the creative process requires foul language. -- Charles Neil

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spunwood

1194 posts in 1462 days


#9 posted 1105 days ago

Thanks Manitario, I’ll definitly post it when done.

-- I came, I was conquered, I was born again. ἵνα ὦσιν ἓν

View learnin2do's profile

learnin2do

866 posts in 1477 days


#10 posted 1105 days ago

i think a non-mitered(?) -staggered but-end(?) corner would be nice -less defining, more joined looking, like pieces of a puzzle that fit, rather than two entities just stuck together -i think…. -if you are using reclaimed wood, it might match better. -or maybe just the thought of having to create such a mitre sounds terrifying!

-- christine

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GaryL

1074 posts in 1456 days


#11 posted 1103 days ago

If your going to glue your blocks up into a solid piece then you need to treat it as a solid pc of wood. A 25” countertop is going to have a fair amount of expansion and contraction. If you miter the corner it will open up as the wood contracts ( at the short end). If you lock the corner together too securely then the top will split. I would suggest bread boarding a butt at the corner.

-- Gary; Marysville, MI...Involve your children in your projects as much as possible, the return is priceless.

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