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Forum topic by MrRon posted 09-29-2018 05:57 PM 1424 views 0 times favorited 35 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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MrRon

5192 posts in 3442 days


09-29-2018 05:57 PM

I just want to express my feelings about the world wide web. Although there is a lot that is wrong about the web, there is a lot more that is good. The web allows me to communicate with people anywhere in the world and speak about common interests, like woodworking, along with anything else of mutual interest.


35 replies so far

View Orvile Baker's profile

Orvile Baker

176 posts in 877 days


#1 posted 09-29-2018 06:38 PM

Hey, hey, I agree, well said. I have made some good friends from all around the world on the web.

-- Bud Baker , Ojibwa, WI. http://papabudswoodtoys.webs.com/

View CWWoodworking's profile

CWWoodworking

184 posts in 378 days


#2 posted 09-29-2018 08:31 PM

For me it’s been good and bad. When I was a runner, the web allowed me to travel to California, spend the week with my on line friend, and run an ultra(34 miles) in the mountains.

Obviously, that is the high point of my on line friendships.

The Woodworking forums? I dunno, sometimes are good, sometimes we all bicker over stupid stuff because we only can see things through our perspective. Me included.

The nice thing about runner/ultra forums is that there aren’t a whole lot of ways to run 34 miles. You just kinda do it how ever you can survive.

Knees started to give out, so I gave up running. Still think about it everyday though.

View Planeman40's profile

Planeman40

1307 posts in 2960 days


#3 posted 09-29-2018 10:34 PM

There is hope coming that may cure the problems with the present web. Here is a copy of the article.

A new web has been developed by the designer of the old web to correct the present problems.

https://www.inrupt.com/

Read on:

https://www.fastcompany.com/90243936/exclusive-tim-berners-lee-tells-us-his-radical-new-plan-to-upend-the-world-wide-web

Exclusive: Tim Berners-Lee tells us his radical new plan to upend the World Wide Web
With an ambitious decentralized platform, the father of the web hopes it’s game on for corporate tech giants like Facebook and Google.

Last week, Tim Berners-Lee, inventor of the World Wide Web, asked me to come and see a project he has been working on almost as long as the web itself. It’s a crisp autumn day in Boston, where Berners-Lee works out of an office above a boxing gym. After politely offering me a cup of coffee, he leads us into a sparse conference room. At one end of a long table is a battered laptop covered with stickers. Here, on this computer, he is working on a plan to radically alter how all of us live and work on the web.

“The intent is world domination,” Berners-Lee says with a wry smile. The British-born scientist is known for his dry sense of humor. But in this case, he is not joking.

This week, Berners-Lee will launch, Inrupt, a startup that he has been building, in stealth mode, for the past nine months. Backed by Glasswing Ventures, its mission is to turbocharge a broader movement afoot, among developers around the world, to decentralize the web and take back power from the forces that have profited from centralizing it. In other words, it’s game on for Facebook, Google, Amazon. For years now, Berners-Lee and other internet activists have been dreaming of a digital utopia where individuals control their own data and the internet remains free and open. But for Berners-Lee, the time for dreaming is over.

“We have to do it now,” he says, displaying an intensity and urgency that is uncharacteristic for this soft-spoken academic. “It’s a historical moment.” Ever since revelations emerged that Facebook had allowed people’s data to be misused by political operatives, Berners-Lee has felt an imperative to get this digital idyll into the real world. In a post published this weekend, Berners-Lee explains that he is taking a sabbatical from MIT to work full time on Inrupt. The company will be the first major commercial venture built off of Solid, a decentralized web platform he and others at MIT have spent years building.
A Netscape for today’s Internet

If all goes as planned, Inrupt will be to Solid what Netscape once was for many first-time users of the web: an easy way in. And like with Netscape, Berners-Lee hopes Inrupt will be just the first of many companies to emerge from Solid.

“I have been imagining this for a very long time,” says Berners-Lee. He opens up his laptop and starts tapping at his keyboard. Watching the inventor of the web work at his computer feels like what it might have been like to watch Beethoven compose a symphony: It’s riveting but hard to fully grasp. “We are in the Solid world now,” he says, his eyes lit up with excitement. He pushes the laptop toward me so I too can see.

On his screen, there is a simple-looking web page with tabs across the top: Tim’s to-do list, his calendar, chats, address book. He built this app–one of the first on Solid–for his personal use. It is simple, spare. In fact, it’s so plain that, at first glance, it’s hard to see its significance. But to Berners-Lee, this is where the revolution begins. The app, using Solid’s decentralized technology, allows Berners-Lee to access all of his data seamlessly–his calendar, his music library, videos, chat, research. It’s like a mashup of Google Drive, Microsoft Outlook, Slack, Spotify, and WhatsApp.

The difference here is that, on Solid, all the information is under his control. Every bit of data he creates or adds on Solid exists within a Solid pod–which is an acronym for personal online data store. These pods are what give Solid users control over their applications and information on the web. Anyone using the platform will get a Solid identity and Solid pod. This is how people, Berners-Lee says, will take back the power of the web from corporations.
[Image courtesy of Tim Berners-Lee]For example, one idea Berners-Lee is currently working on is a way to create a decentralized version of Alexa, Amazon’s increasingly ubiquitous digital assistant. He calls it Charlie. Unlike with Alexa, on Charlie people would own all their data. That means they could trust Charlie with, for example, health records, children’s school events, or financial records. That is the kind of machine Berners-Lee hopes will spring up all over Solid to flip the power dynamics of the web from corporation to individuals.
A new revolution for developers?

Berners-Lee believes Solid will resonate with the global community of developers, hackers, and internet activists who bristle over corporate and government control of the web. “Developers have always had a certain amount of revolutionary spirit,” he observes. Circumventing government spies or corporate overlords may be the initial lure of Solid, but the bigger draw will be something even more appealing to hackers: freedom. In the centralized web, data is kept in silos–controlled by the companies that build them, like Facebook and Google. In the decentralized web, there are no silos.

Starting this week, developers around the world will be able to start building their own decentralized apps with tools through the Inrupt site. Berners-Lee will spend this fall criss-crossing the globe, giving tutorials and presentations to developers about Solid and Inrupt. (There will be a Solid tutorial at our Fast Company Innovation Festival on October 23.)

“What’s great about having a startup versus a research group is things get done,” he says. These days, instead of heading into his lab at MIT, Berners-Lee comes to the Inrupt offices, which are currently based out of Janeiro Digital, a company he has contracted to help work on Inrupt. For now, the company consists of Berners-Lee; his partner John Bruce, who built Resilient, a security platform bought by IBM; a handful of on-staff developers contracted to work on the project; and a community of volunteer coders.

Later this fall, Berners-Lee plans to start looking for more venture funding and grow his team. The aim, for now, is not to make billions of dollars. The man who gave the web away for free has never been motivated by money. Still, his plans could impact billion-dollar business models that profit off of control over data. It’s not likely that the big powers of the web will give up control without a fight.

When asked about this, Berners-Lee says flatly: “We are not talking to Facebook and Google about whether or not to introduce a complete change where all their business models are completely upended overnight. We are not asking their permission.”

Game on.

-- Always remember: It is a mathematical certainty that half the people in this country are below average in intelligence!

View lumbering_on's profile

lumbering_on

574 posts in 689 days


#4 posted 09-29-2018 10:50 PM



For me it’s been good and bad. When I was a runner, the web allowed me to travel to California, spend the week with my on line friend, and run an ultra(34 miles) in the mountains.

Obviously, that is the high point of my on line friendships.

The Woodworking forums? I dunno, sometimes are good, sometimes we all bicker over stupid stuff because we only can see things through our perspective. Me included.

The nice thing about runner/ultra forums is that there aren’t a whole lot of ways to run 34 miles. You just kinda do it how ever you can survive.

Knees started to give out, so I gave up running. Still think about it everyday though.

- CWWoodworking

I used to belong to a runner’s forum a few years back, and I met a few people from the site – good times. Running in the morning, drinking in the evening. :) My knees are still good, but I’ve been fighting Achilles’s tendinitis (actually tendinosis) for a few years. I tell people that I love running, but running doesn’t love me back. :(

I actually find LJ a better site than many for the level of conflicts. Political sites are the absolute worst, but IT sites seem to be a close second. I rarely read the comments on any of these sties so as to keep my sanity.

View Rick S...'s profile

Rick S...

10913 posts in 3232 days


#5 posted 09-29-2018 11:24 PM



For me it’s been good and bad. When I was a runner, the web allowed me to travel to California, spend the week with my online friend, and run an ultra (34 miles) in the mountains.

Obviously, that is the highpoint of my online friendships.

The Woodworking forums? I dunno, sometimes are good, sometimes we all bicker over stupid stuff because we only can see things through our perspective. Me included.

The nice thing about runner/ultra forums is that there aren’t a whole lot of ways to run 34 miles. You just kinda do it how ever you can survive.

Knees started to give out, so I gave up running. Still think about it everyday though.

- CWWoodworking

Totally Agree!

Rick S.

-- I Chose "The Road Less Travelled" Now I'm Totally Lost! (Ontario, CANADA)

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

4772 posts in 2508 days


#6 posted 09-30-2018 12:02 AM


For me it’s been good and bad. When I was a runner, the web allowed me to travel to California, spend the week with my on line friend, and run an ultra(34 miles) in the mountains.

Obviously, that is the high point of my on line friendships.

The Woodworking forums? I dunno, sometimes are good, sometimes we all bicker over stupid stuff because we only can see things through our perspective. Me included.

The nice thing about runner/ultra forums is that there aren’t a whole lot of ways to run 34 miles. You just kinda do it how ever you can survive.

Knees started to give out, so I gave up running. Still think about it everyday though.

- CWWoodworking


Bicker? Have you ever been to the following.

A town hall meeting
A PTA meeting
A community council meeting
A kids sports event
etc etc etc, It just humane nature you don’t need the internet to bicker. Us humans are and have been bicker experts since the beginning of time. :)

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

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ArtMann

1139 posts in 1015 days


#7 posted 09-30-2018 12:07 AM

You forgot “political rally”.

View CWWoodworking's profile

CWWoodworking

184 posts in 378 days


#8 posted 09-30-2018 12:35 AM

Try to avoid all like the plague. Especially anything to do with politics. Any side.

View CWWoodworking's profile

CWWoodworking

184 posts in 378 days


#9 posted 09-30-2018 02:34 AM


I used to belong to a runner s forum a few years back, and I met a few people from the site – good times. Running in the morning, drinking in the evening. :) My knees are still good, but I ve been fighting Achilles s tendinitis (actually tendinosis) for a few years. I tell people that I love running, but running doesn t love me back. :(

I actually find LJ a better site than many for the level of conflicts. Political sites are the absolute worst, but IT sites seem to be a close second. I rarely read the comments on any of these sties so as to keep my sanity.

- lumbering_on

LJ is better than other Woodworking forums

As for running, if you are a true, natural runner, have at it. If you are a grinder like I was, please be careful. I went from not being able to complete a mile to running sub 7 mm in a half marathon to not being able to run a hundred feet.

I believe some are built for it, some are not. I think I’m just too chunkie

View Desert_Woodworker's profile

Desert_Woodworker

1631 posts in 1413 days


#10 posted 09-30-2018 02:55 AM

Mr. Ron, you sure know how to get it going…

Here is a link to an article, from the founder, changes are coming…

https://www.fastcompany.com/90243936/exclusive-tim-berners-lee-tells-us-his-radical-new-plan-to-upend-the-world-wide-web

-- Desert_Woodworker

View Craftsman on the lake's profile

Craftsman on the lake

2831 posts in 3637 days


#11 posted 09-30-2018 03:07 AM

Hmmm… not to be sarcastic or anything but this is a weird topic for something that has been a standard, daily part of life for the past 35 years. Forums like this one, my phone, all my electronic entertainment, banking, ordering most of the things I buy, updating medications, my power usage,.... etc. on and on…

‘A few words about the web, some stuff is good and some not so good????’

I’d also like to add that I’ve finally decided that my refrigerator has some things I like about it and some things I don’t. Ya it keeps things cold but I’ve got that very cold spot in the upper left. Tomatoes freeze sometime. Just the same. After a 60 year trial run using them I think I’ll keep it. It’s better than not having it. Saves a lot of canning.

;-)

-- The smell of wood, coffee in the cup, the wife let's me do my thing, the lake is peaceful.

View JADobson's profile

JADobson

1285 posts in 2310 days


#12 posted 09-30-2018 03:15 AM

Craftsman on the lake

+100

Haha

-- No craft is very far from the line beyond which is magic. -- Lord Dunsany — Instagram @grailwoodworks

View Woodknack's profile

Woodknack

12430 posts in 2579 days


#13 posted 09-30-2018 04:59 AM

Honestly, I wish the web had never been invented in my lifetime. Five years ago I would have said differently. But it is what it is.

-- Rick M, http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

View TravisH's profile

TravisH

627 posts in 2134 days


#14 posted 09-30-2018 11:08 AM

Web is great, how one uses it is the trick. Too many are not capable of weeding through the “information” and end up no better than they would have been without access.

It also is the only social outlet for many individuals, which is unfortunate. It also keeps a lot of individuals from getting knocked on their ass, which is unfortunate.

View oldnovice's profile

oldnovice

7325 posts in 3567 days


#15 posted 09-30-2018 09:01 PM

You can love it or you can leave it but it won’t go away!

-- "I never met a board I didn't like!"

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