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What type of glue to use

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Forum topic by rogerw posted 08-10-2011 10:02 PM 1196 views 0 times favorited 12 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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rogerw

262 posts in 2151 days


08-10-2011 10:02 PM

Been a while since I’ve been on here. Been a busy summer so far. working a lot, getting some bike riding in here and there, visiting the kids, etc., everything but making sawdust. In fact I haven’t been out there since completing the dollhouse 3 months ago.

My current project is finally getting around to building a new router table. The first one I built has served me well but has sagged in the middle of the table from the weight of the router. Can’t complain though as it is probably close to ten years old if not older. I don’t remember exactly when I built it. Its a small, bench-top style. This one is going to be floor model I think. I doubt if it will be even close to the fancy ones I see on here but if I’m happy with it then that’s all that matters, right?

ok… enough rambling… on with the question… well at least leading up to it.
My wife and I were at one of those places where you can get second hand cabinets, doors, and other construction products at a cheap price. A 3’x4’ piece of double-sided laminated particle board caught my eye and they only wanted a couple bucks for it. so I bought it. I cut the one to finish size and the other one close to that with the intent of using a flush trim bit to match them up.

now… the question… yes… here at last…
what kind of adhesive can I use that will bond to laminate to glue these pieces together? I realize I will have to scuff up the laminate before applying the adhesive I just don’t know the best choice.

Any ideas???

Thanx people :)

Roger

-- >> my shop teacher used to say "do the best at everything you make for your mom because you're going to see it for the rest of your life!" <<


12 replies so far

View Gary's profile

Gary

8968 posts in 2894 days


#1 posted 08-10-2011 10:15 PM

I would use contact or expoxy

-- Gary, DeKalb Texas only 4 miles from the mill

View Loren's profile

Loren

8299 posts in 3109 days


#2 posted 08-10-2011 10:24 PM

You want to sandwich layers of laminate?

Scuff heavily and use liquid nails or epoxy or contact cement, and
clamp heavily.

If what you mean by laminate is melamine board, you can try
melamine glue.

View rogerw's profile

rogerw

262 posts in 2151 days


#3 posted 08-10-2011 10:28 PM

it’s white and is what cabinets are typically surfaced with.

-- >> my shop teacher used to say "do the best at everything you make for your mom because you're going to see it for the rest of your life!" <<

View Tim Kindrick's profile

Tim Kindrick

369 posts in 2016 days


#4 posted 08-11-2011 12:32 AM

I would recommend contact cement. Epoxy would be a pain if used on a large surface area!!! AND liquid nails would be hard to get completely flat without some creative clamping!!!!

Still use sandpaper to scuff the surface first.

-- I have metal in my neck but wood in my blood!!

View gfadvm's profile

gfadvm

14940 posts in 2151 days


#5 posted 08-11-2011 04:21 AM

Weldwood Gel Contact Cement is MUCH more user friendly than the conventional liquid contact cement which I refer to as “elephant snot”.

-- " I'll try to be nicer, if you'll try to be smarter" gfadvm

View Loren's profile

Loren

8299 posts in 3109 days


#6 posted 08-11-2011 05:18 AM

It sounds like you’re gluing melamine. It’s hard to scuff it well enough
to get most glues to stick.

I don’t know how well melamine glue works for laminating, but it might
be worth getting a bottle and testing it.

I would probably do something like tilt my table saw to 45 degrees and make
real shallow scoring cuts shooting for 3/64” deep going both ways in
each piece, then scuff and glue. Since you’re sandwiching two layers
for structural reasons, the cuts won’t be a problem. In veneering over
melamine, you can’t get away with those scoring cuts because they’ll
show through the veneer.

Read this thread at Woodweb:

http://www.woodweb.com/knowledge_base/Bonding_Laminate_to_Melamine.html

View MoshupTrail's profile

MoshupTrail

302 posts in 1942 days


#7 posted 08-11-2011 12:00 PM

Why use glue at all? I’m assuming this is planned as the top surface of your router table. So one side (the top) you WANT the melamine, but the underside does not matter. Right? If that’s the case I might just screw the two pieces together with a few dozen well-placed screws from the bottom. Just be careful they don’t come through the top! I’d probably drill small pilot holes and countersink them too. If the material is 3/4 inch, you have 1 1/2 total, so a 1 inch screw countersunk should be safe.

-- Some problems are best solved with an optimistic approach. Optimism shines a light on alternatives that are otherwise not visible.

View rogerw's profile

rogerw

262 posts in 2151 days


#8 posted 08-11-2011 05:05 PM

i never considered screws. definately simplifies the whole situation! thanx for the different approach. i like it.

these are the two boards i want to double up. not sure if it’s laminate or melamine.

roger

-- >> my shop teacher used to say "do the best at everything you make for your mom because you're going to see it for the rest of your life!" <<

View sawdustphill's profile

sawdustphill

53 posts in 2152 days


#9 posted 08-11-2011 11:12 PM

I would use contact cement

Phillip from Ky.

View rogerw's profile

rogerw

262 posts in 2151 days


#10 posted 08-13-2011 01:31 PM

i think i have chosen the screw method… strategically placed that is. just have to figure out where i DON’T want screws.

thanx

-- >> my shop teacher used to say "do the best at everything you make for your mom because you're going to see it for the rest of your life!" <<

View cutmantom's profile

cutmantom

389 posts in 2496 days


#11 posted 08-13-2011 01:57 PM

put a screw at each corner, then make your top, when finished put the rest of the screws in, also in the bottom layer you could cut the hole for the router a little smaller than the top layer to provide a ledge to support the router plate, screw driven in this lip would provide leveling adjustment for the plate

View rogerw's profile

rogerw

262 posts in 2151 days


#12 posted 08-13-2011 05:24 PM

sounds like a plan cutmantom. don’t need to figure it out your way.

that’s what i like about this place…. so many ideas, so little time! lol

thanx!

-- >> my shop teacher used to say "do the best at everything you make for your mom because you're going to see it for the rest of your life!" <<

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