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Milling Blanks on the Band saw

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Forum topic by TonyArru posted 09-27-2018 01:56 PM 729 views 0 times favorited 14 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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TonyArru

53 posts in 2385 days


09-27-2018 01:56 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question bandsaw lathe blade milling turning arts and crafts rustic victorian greene and greene shaker modern traditional

Hello everyone, I have a question that I’m hoping to get some answers to…

This has happened a few times now and it leads to me having to prematurely replace bandsaw blades. Thankfully even the Bosch bandsaw blades that I buy are only about 15$ on amazon.com so its not a HUGE deal, but still Id like to keep a blade on for a while before having to replace it….So, here goes…

When Im milling blanks (cross cutting logs) no larger than 8 inches in diameter on my 14 inch Ridgid band saw, I am often getting a “catch” where the blade gets twisted and sometimes stuck in the log, rendering the blade useless…WHY is this happening?? does it happen to anyone else?

I recently bought a 40$ Timber Wolf bandsaw blade, hopefully that works??? Oh and all my blades are 3-4 TPI and 1/2 inch thick.

Thanks!


14 replies so far

View Bill White's profile

Bill White

5097 posts in 4131 days


#1 posted 09-27-2018 02:38 PM

Are you cutting green wood? Is the tension correct? Lots of questions before we can help.
A 2/3 skip tooth blade with a lot of set to clear the chips would be my blade choice.
Just my quick diagnosis.

-- bill@magraphics.us

View Nubsnstubs's profile

Nubsnstubs

1414 posts in 1901 days


#2 posted 09-27-2018 03:06 PM

You have no support under the log where it’s cutting. The same thing happens when I transition from crosscut to ripping if there isn’t support under the log. I know it’s a possibility, so I keep some cutoffs around to wedge under the log to stabilize it…............. Jerry (in Tucson)

-- Jerry (in Tucson) www.woodturnerstools.com

View Jared_S's profile

Jared_S

65 posts in 130 days


#3 posted 09-27-2018 03:14 PM

You need a jig (sled) to keep the logs from rolling. The catches will happen if you don’t secure the stock

View TonyArru's profile

TonyArru

53 posts in 2385 days


#4 posted 09-27-2018 04:25 PM

Thanks for your input guys, I guess I am having a hard time understanding the physics involved. It seems to make sense that because the log is round, there are some areas that are unsupported. I guess I dont realize just how much downward force there is on the piece, and how the table itself resists that force. I don’t seem to understand how that translates into a “catch” and twisted blade? If I saw it in slow motion maybe..lol. Furthermore, how will a sled add the support needed to complete the cuts safely? or is there a special “log sled” that can be built?

View pottz's profile

pottz

3331 posts in 1155 days


#5 posted 09-27-2018 06:04 PM

you can make a simple sled that you would screw the log to and that woild keep the log from rolling.you can find many examples here.actually if you look on fidays projects mdehr posted his sawmill sled,probably bigger than you need but could be scaled down.and make sure you have enough tension on the blade.

-- sawdust the bigger the pile the bigger my smile-larry,so cal.

View ocean's profile

ocean

117 posts in 1004 days


#6 posted 09-27-2018 06:16 PM

What everyone in saying is as you cut thru the log the kerf angle will change if you do not support and secure the log it will shift position and bind and twist the blade. A sled is the easy way to secure the log by screwing thru the sled into the log in a couple of places. This will maintain a vertical kerf and prevent the log from rolling and shifting position. Don’t feel bad I think everyone has done this once or twice themselves. A sled is the way to go.

-- Bob, FL Keys

View Wildwood's profile

Wildwood

2448 posts in 2305 days


#7 posted 09-27-2018 07:13 PM

Do you have a riser block for your bandsaw? Rigid 14 “ saw normally come with either 3/4 or 1 HP motor but really less than 6” cutting height. So little confused cross or ripping logs larger thn 6”’s.

Plenty of both cross cutting & ripping or resawing sleds on the internet just check out you-tube.

After cross cutting with my sled will true up ends with a parting tool.

Have a 14” Grizzly bandsaw without riser kit, and use this homemade scrap wood sled. Use furniture clamps to hold log whether cross cutting or ripping. One side is fixed in place with screws the movable end has lag bolt which slides along the slot. Had to adjust width & height of movable side so would not interfear with bandsaw hardware.

-- Bill

View TonyArru's profile

TonyArru

53 posts in 2385 days


#8 posted 09-28-2018 12:52 PM



Do you have a riser block for your bandsaw? Rigid 14 “ saw normally come with either 3/4 or 1 HP motor but really less than 6” cutting height. So little confused cross or ripping logs larger thn 6” s.

Plenty of both cross cutting & ripping or resawing sleds on the internet just check out you-tube.

After cross cutting with my sled will true up ends with a parting tool.

Have a 14” Grizzly bandsaw without riser kit, and use this homemade scrap wood sled. Use furniture clamps to hold log whether cross cutting or ripping. One side is fixed in place with screws the movable end has lag bolt which slides along the slot. Had to adjust width & height of movable side so would not interfear with bandsaw hardware.

- Wildwood

I do not have a riser block, I may have been a little over zealous in my estimation of how much resaw capacity my saw has….I never measured it, since I don’t resaw often. But yes, six inches sounds about correct.

Thank you for all the support and tips. I will most likely build a sled for my saw, and stop spending money on blades prematurely (hopefully)!

View Nubsnstubs's profile

Nubsnstubs

1414 posts in 1901 days


#9 posted 09-28-2018 01:33 PM


Hello everyone, I have a question that I m hoping to get some answers to…

This has happened a few times now and it leads to me having to prematurely replace bandsaw blades. Thankfully even the Bosch bandsaw blades that I buy are only about 15$ on amazon.com so its not a HUGE deal, but still Id like to keep a blade on for a while before having to replace it….So, here goes…

When Im milling blanks (cross cutting logs) no larger than 8 inches in diameter on my 14 inch Ridgid band saw, I am often getting a “catch” where the blade gets twisted and sometimes stuck in the log, rendering the blade useless...WHY is this happening?? does it happen to anyone else?

I recently bought a 40$ Timber Wolf bandsaw blade, hopefully that works??? Oh and all my blades are 3-4 TPI and 1/2 inch thick.

Thanks!

- TonyArru

On that comment in bold, if your blade did not break, it is not useless yet. Take it off and bend it back to as straight as you can. I wouldn’t use it for cutting anything precise, but it’s still usable on cutting rounds and other rough cuts…. Just because a blade got bent is no reason to toss it until it’s too dull to use or it breaks.

3 tpi is good but 1/2 might be a little wide for some radii. ............... Jerry (in Tucson)

-- Jerry (in Tucson) www.woodturnerstools.com

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TonyArru

53 posts in 2385 days


#10 posted 10-03-2018 06:41 PM

Thanks for the tips…I plan on making a sled to cross cut logs. I like the 1/2 blade for re-sawing boards. I have thought about keeping the saw and making a frame saw out of it…I hate throwing anything away that is still useful. That being said, none of my bent blades have been tossed…they are waiting to be repurposed somewhere, somehow. If you have any other suggestions besides a frame saw, let me know!

View Kelly's profile

Kelly

2095 posts in 3115 days


#11 posted 10-16-2018 06:55 AM

Key is, they are not talking about the air gap where the blade exits the wood and down to the table. Rather, they are just saying you need a V shaped sled, in which the log rests (to hold the wood) and which rides in the miter slot, as the blade moves through the wood.

View therealSteveN's profile

therealSteveN

1564 posts in 745 days


#12 posted 10-16-2018 11:45 AM

A quick question to see if other possible problems may exist. This only happens when cutting the roughly shaped logs?

If your answer is yes, then what you have been told will cover it, especially the thought to use a sled to hold, and position the wood. Beyond stabilizing the part to be cut, the only other things that come to mind you have also been told to look for.

Proper blade tension, and USUALLY the tension gauges are too soft, Read about blade tension with no more than 1/4 inch of deflection. Lonnie Bird knows what he is talking about. Follow his lead, and you will see better cuts if you haven’t been tensioning your blade properly.

How quickly to move stock through the blade. That is a loaded question that will have a multitude of answers based on all aspects of the cut, species, will talk about grain makeup, and density, Janka hardness, The blade you are using, tooth geometry, and a lot more. It may be impossible for the average Man to ever know all the aspects involved. One thing you can do, saw slower just to make sure the blade is cutting, and you are not pushing. Going too slow may bore you, but it will seldom break a blade. Too fast and many blades will get torqued sideways in the guides, and BAM you just broke a 15 dollar blade. Even if the blade stays straight, you need to allow the gullets to empty. 3 TPI on a 1/2” blade isn’t a real deep gullet. All of that sawdust needs to clear so the blade can keep sawing. If it doesn’t that creates heat, blades don’t stay sharp long, and could just break due to too much heat.

-- Think safe, be safe

View Lazyman's profile

Lazyman

2556 posts in 1558 days


#13 posted 10-16-2018 02:02 PM

You could make something simple like this from a few scraps but I usually just put a clamp on one end that prevents it rolling while making the cut.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

View Kelly's profile

Kelly

2095 posts in 3115 days


#14 posted 10-16-2018 04:34 PM

One more point on tensioning the blade: I started getting thumping on cheap and expensive blades. For some reason, I had taken to adding more tension than the blade needed, which created the problem.

After dealing with the problem with several blades, I figured it had to be a operator error, rather than that every blade manufacturer in the world had just become incompetent. I backed down on the tension and my version of Denmark is fine and well again.

In summary, there is a happy medium. You want enough tension to stop excessive side flexing, but not so much you test the spring, stretch the blade and create a new problem.

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