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Routing tenons with a straight edge?

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Forum topic by opalko posted 08-08-2011 04:50 PM 1630 views 0 times favorited 12 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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opalko

135 posts in 2495 days


08-08-2011 04:50 PM

Topic tags/keywords: router tenon routing

I’m making a table which will have aprons nearly 6’ long. I’ve never had good luck making tenons on the table saw and even though I have a crosscut sled I don’t want to try them with it as they are just too long.

I had the idea of laying the long aprons across the workbench, placing a straight edge a certain distance from the edge, and then route 1/2 of the tenon by hand running the router along the straight edge. Is this too easy? What pitfalls should I know about?

Cheers,
Robert


12 replies so far

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Bertha

13003 posts in 2153 days


#1 posted 08-08-2011 04:51 PM

It can certainly be done but there’s not much room for error with a router bit. Do you have a RAS?

-- My dad and I built a 65 chev pick up.I killed trannys in that thing for some reason-Hog

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opalko

135 posts in 2495 days


#2 posted 08-08-2011 04:54 PM

Yes, got a Delta. I don’t know that it’s 100 dead accurate.

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opalko

135 posts in 2495 days


#3 posted 08-08-2011 05:09 PM

Also, how would you get the top & bottom edges cut with a RAS?

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opalko

135 posts in 2495 days


#4 posted 08-08-2011 05:21 PM

I wish there was a way to use my dedicated mortiser on the aprons and just make floating tenons. Maybe a 7’ high table??

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Bertha

13003 posts in 2153 days


#5 posted 08-08-2011 05:43 PM

I’ve never cut tenons on my RAS but I’ve heard of people doing it. Anytime I bring a really LOOOONG board into my shop, I start at the RAS and figure out if there’s some way I can use it, lol. People cut dados with a straight bit and a straight edge all the time. I see no reason why your router wouldn’t work. Make sure everything is tightly clamped or you’ll be making up some new profanity. If you’re really worried, you could build a dedicated jig, then just ease the cuts toward your mark. Do you own a shoulder plane? You can always “get close” then police it up with the plane. I think you’ve got a plan.

You know….you CAN cut tenons with a handsaw. Just sayin! ;)

-- My dad and I built a 65 chev pick up.I killed trannys in that thing for some reason-Hog

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opalko

135 posts in 2495 days


#6 posted 08-08-2011 06:01 PM

I know, I know. I don’t own a shoulder plane however, though it’s on the wishlist. I know I could cut them by hand, but this is white oak, wide, and thick. Talk about learning new profanities! Come to think of it I don’t own a good backsaw anyway, just one of those smaller “Gent’s Saw”...

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Loren

8295 posts in 3107 days


#7 posted 08-08-2011 06:04 PM

The router method works. I make a frame from two pieces of straight
wood with a carriage bolt at each end. I sandwich the work piece in the
frame, offset so the shoulder cut goes in the right place and is square.

Cut the first shoulder, then flip the piece and cut the second shoulder.

Once the shoulders are established, cutting out the waste is not
difficult. Cut the end off last because the wood there supports
the router base.

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opalko

135 posts in 2495 days


#8 posted 08-08-2011 06:06 PM

Excellent idea – I think I’ll try it and may even make a loong frame to run all 4 pieces at once.

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crank49

3980 posts in 2431 days


#9 posted 08-08-2011 06:11 PM

May be time to invest in a Dozuki, and a rabbit plane or a good chisel.

I think a router would work fine. I would cut it in stages, starting at the end and working my way back to the shoulder. Might be worth while to get a spiral bit since all the cuts would essentially be end grain.

-- Michael: Hillary has a long list of accomplishments, though most DAs would refer to them as felonies.

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MrRon

3926 posts in 2703 days


#10 posted 08-08-2011 07:57 PM

A hand held router works fine. If you have more than one tenon to cut, you need to build a jig. It should have a large, flat surface to provide good support for the router base so it doesn’t “rock”. A jig, if properly made, will guarantee accurate, repeatable cuts. It takes a bit more time, but the results will be worthwhile. I do this all the time. It may take me an hour to make a jig and a few seconds to make the cut.

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opalko

135 posts in 2495 days


#11 posted 08-08-2011 08:35 PM

I’m still trying to figure out how you’d saw a tenon on a long apron by hand. You would either have to lay the piece flat on a table and saw parallel to the floor or have the piece set in a vise running it parallel to your bench, either way it looks like you would cut it at a very awkward angle… Am I wrong about this?

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WayneC

12642 posts in 3557 days


#12 posted 08-09-2011 06:38 AM

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