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Removing jointer bed, Jet JJ-6CSX

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Forum topic by kocgolf posted 09-23-2018 08:11 PM 276 views 0 times favorited 6 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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kocgolf

350 posts in 2319 days


09-23-2018 08:11 PM

I have decided that I need to take apart my new CL jointer completely to get it clean and oiled and make me feel really happy with it. I have completely disassembled the fence and cleaned, de-rusted and painted the entire fence system. I have pulled the cutterhead to clean, de-rust and then replace the bearings on. Now I want to get the tables completely off and pull the threaded rods from the adjustment wheels and ball crank out. Do I need to turn the entire assembly upside down on the bench? Does anyone know what holds this all together? I have searched all over without a lot of success finding just what to do, in what order. I do have the manual printed out.


6 replies so far

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therealSteveN

1377 posts in 715 days


#1 posted 09-23-2018 10:51 PM

Hopefully this will offer you a usable road map.

When taking apart ANY tool I take pics as I go, and keep written documentation to explain in my terms what I am seeing in the pics. Every piece off I shoot it assembled, then again off the machine. I store the parts in a linear fashion walking away from the tool and putting them down, so the last part is right next to me when I take it off. Hopefully the machine is on a rolling stand so you can push it along and collect parts as you re-assemble it.

I say this tongue in cheek, if a tool has 35 of the same screw, bolt, nut I don’t photograph them all, just the stuff as you pull it off you think, gee, didn’t see that coming.

A lot of a jointer is straight forward with the most detailed portion being the ways and gibs for bed movement, and adjustment. Beyond that it’s a lot of motor driving a belt attached to a cylindrical drum with your blades in it.

Best of luck with it. Doing this with any new tool is a great way to become very familiar with it, and what makes it’s adjustments work. Knowing that will make you a better user.

-- Think safe, be safe

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kocgolf

350 posts in 2319 days


#2 posted 09-24-2018 04:46 PM

Thanks, I do think I see the general idea of it. It’s different in construction to the old Delta Milwaukee I am upgrading from. I do love to take things apart to learn more about them. I don’t have a lot of mechanical experience, but this is how you get it! Plus, I just love older things that are super clean, oiled, and run nice and smoooooth. Granted, this Jet isn’t old, but it’s filthy and I just don’t like when I have to force the adjustments because of gunk buildup.

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fivecodys

1160 posts in 1777 days


#3 posted 09-24-2018 09:13 PM


Thanks, I do think I see the general idea of it. It s different in construction to the old Delta Milwaukee I am upgrading from. I do love to take things apart to learn more about them. I don t have a lot of mechanical experience, but this is how you get it! Plus, I just love older things that are super clean, oiled, and run nice and smoooooth. Granted, this Jet isn t old, but it s filthy and I just don t like when I have to force the adjustments because of gunk buildup.

- kocgolf

I have never taken my tables off but I did repaint a few spots on the fence. If I remember right, Rustoleum has an off white that is really close.

-- I always knew I would grow old, But I expected it to take longer!

View TheFridge's profile

TheFridge

10243 posts in 1627 days


#4 posted 09-25-2018 01:41 AM

I’ve taken a couple brands apart. Haven’t pulled the tables completely off my jet. The powermatic had to lay on its side to pull the beds off. The removeable threaded boss for adjusting the table had to be pulled out from the bottom to slide the table up and out. Or something like that.

Rustoleum paint plus primer works great.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

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SweetTea

356 posts in 801 days


#5 posted 09-25-2018 10:55 AM

First off do the beds slide on dovetail ways or is it a parallelogram jointer? If it slides on dovetail ways then it should be fairly straight forward. I would have a buddy or two to hold each side as you are disassembling that way nothing drops suddenly and gets damaged. I would just look everything over and start taking out screws, bolts, or whatever you see. The beds should not be that difficult to remove if they slide on dovetail ways.

If the jointer is a parallelogram design, my advice would be to not remove the beds. I own a large Steelex jointer that is a parallelogram design and as long as you can dial in the adjustments properly I wouldn’t recommend removing the beds.

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kocgolf

350 posts in 2319 days


#6 posted 09-25-2018 03:36 PM

They are on dovetails or I wouldn’t even be considering it. I am thinking that I get some help to just flip the whole table assembly upside down on the bench and try and clean, maybe even remove, just the handwheels, screw and ball crank assembly and clean them up. That is where most of the “gunk” is. I won’t be adjusting heights often, so if I can get that much cleaned up, it probably won’t be necessary to fully remove the tables from their dovetails.

I picked up some Rustoleum Ivory Gloss from Menards because they had the largest selection of spray paints. It still isn’t quite right. Krylon Ivory may be better, or Rustoleum Canvas White from what I hear. May have to order those online.

Next up is trying to get my brother in laws bearing puller so I can de-rust the cutterhead.

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