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Forum topic by Ritty posted 08-07-2011 10:54 PM 836 views 0 times favorited 15 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Ritty

63 posts in 1455 days


08-07-2011 10:54 PM

Topic tags/keywords: plane

whats better, a low angle or a regular angle for a block plane for all around work, i would like it to leave a smooth surface no matter what, then again what does the low angle even do, i know these questions should have obvious answers but im new to the hand tool world and from what hand tools i own i like using more than power tools, it would be good if you guys could inlighten me eon the subject.

specificly i was looking at the stanley sweetheart block planes from woodcraft ive purchased their chisels and loved em, i was thinking about buying their blockplanes


15 replies so far

View David Kirtley's profile

David Kirtley

1281 posts in 1656 days


#1 posted 08-08-2011 01:36 AM

For block planes, it is good to have both. The low angle is better for endgrain and the higher angle for everything else.

Even the modern regular adjustable mouth stanley block planes are inexpensive and well made. I have not seen the new stanley planes in person but I doubt that they are that much better to get the premium price over the standard offerings. If it were me, I would rather have the plain ones (or older ones—I have both) and save the price difference price for something else. A good rasp, a shoulder plane, another type of saw. Lots of ways to spend money but I don’t see the new block planes as a lot of bang for the buck.

-- Woodworking shouldn't cost a fortune: http://lowbudgetwoodworker.blogspot.com/

View ChuckM's profile

ChuckM

501 posts in 2324 days


#2 posted 08-08-2011 04:29 AM

If you can afford only one block plane for now, this may be a solution:

a) Get a low-angle block plane with a 25-degree blade which is essential for end grain work (the cutting angle is 25+ 12 = 37 degrees)
b) Get a replacement blade at 38 degrees and regrind/sharpening it to 33 degrees (the cutting angle is 33 + 12 = 45 degrees, same as a standard block plane’s).

If you do a lot of planing with both planes, then this is not a good solution. But for those who use the standard block plane not so often, this is a good compromise.

-- The time I enjoy wasting is not time wasted

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Ritty

63 posts in 1455 days


#3 posted 08-08-2011 05:23 AM

thx such a good help,but could i also use the low angle for everything else as well would it make a difference than the regular?

View David Kirtley's profile

David Kirtley

1281 posts in 1656 days


#4 posted 08-08-2011 06:22 AM

The low angle plane will tend to tear out the grain as you are planing along the grain. That said, I would say to get the low angle version as you already have that nice Krenov style plane if you want to buy one. Or you could make one just like your other one with a lower angle and it will be just as good as what you would buy. You can also make a smaller high angle block plane just like you made the other one. Just trim it shorter. Then a long one for a jointer and you are gold unless you sneak in my favorite: a scrub plane.

I don’t feel that you can really buy a plane that will out perform what you have with the one you made until you get to some really high end infill planes. Even then, it is debatable.

If the one you made is not performing well, let us know and we can give you some tips to tune it up. It looks like you made it properly and should be a sweet performer.

-- Woodworking shouldn't cost a fortune: http://lowbudgetwoodworker.blogspot.com/

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ChuckM

501 posts in 2324 days


#5 posted 08-08-2011 06:30 AM

What plane you should get depends on what kind of job you intend to use it on. As David pointed out, long grain job requires the use of a standard block plane, while cleaning up dovetail joints and other end grain work calls for the use of a low-angle block plane. Over time, most people may get both. Stanley block planes cost a lot less than Veritas and LN and you may want to try out the various brands first. There’s nothing like holding up one in your hand and making some shavings to find out what works for you.

-- The time I enjoy wasting is not time wasted

View WayneC's profile

WayneC

12290 posts in 2755 days


#6 posted 08-08-2011 06:58 AM

If I had to choose one over another, I would go with a low angle block plane with an adjustable mouth. I think they are more versatile, but it is more of a personal preference thing.

Relative to the premium planes, if you do buy a LN or a Veritas plane, it will likely be the only one you need for the remainder of your working time. I own both of the LN adjustable mouth block planes. You could also find and restore an old Stanley 60 1/2 or 65 block plane (both are low angle) if cost is an issue. I would avoid the lower cost modern block planes.

With Lie-Nielsen Plane

-- We must guard our enthusiasm as we would our life - James Krenov

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Ritty

63 posts in 1455 days


#7 posted 08-09-2011 04:24 AM

i already own a block plane, but the rust on it is really bad and i believe beyond fixing i was thinking about buying the sweetheart block plane so i can continue making the woodies, i relized its impotants after the first woodie i made because there is still saw marks on there, that cause a little bit of trouble when adjusting the blade, i watched davids video he has on youtube on how to make planes for his book and he has awell tuned block plane so i figured that would help and the one i made works well just need to sharpen the blade again, bought some stones but im afraid im going to round over the bevel edge, practice makesperrfect tho. thx again guys for your feed back keep it up, and should i make a scrub plane? what does it even do? is it for concave objects?

View David Kirtley's profile

David Kirtley

1281 posts in 1656 days


#8 posted 08-09-2011 03:50 PM

Planes are similar to sandpaper. Sometimes you want 40 grit and sometimes you want 220 grit and sometimes you want to polish with 1000 grit and beyond.

Your normal jack plane is the equivalent of the medium grit. You can do a lot with it but you are not going to get a fine finish. A finely tuned smoother or jointer is the fine grit. You are taking of nearly unmeasurable wisps. The scrub plane is your 40 grit and beyond. It will chomp out big mouthfullls of wood.

The fineness of the plane is decided by the radius of the blade. Flatter is smoother, rounder is more aggressive. A jack plane will usually have a gentle rounding. A smoother or jointer will be nearly flat with just the corners rounded so it doesn’t leave divots in the sides like train tracks.

If the block plane you have is rusty, clean it up. If it is too far gone, you can’t hurt it anyway. I suspect it is ok as I have seen very few planes that could not be saved. Lets see some pics.

The saw marks shouldn’t be a problem. What is the plane doing that it shouldn’t?

Here is how I adjust mine:

Start with the iron out.
Set the plane on a flat surface.
Set the iron in with it all the way down to the bottom and put the wedge in.
Without moving the iron, tighten up the wedge (You don’t have to get it that tight, you are not trying to split stuff.)
Then test cut (It shouldn’t cut anything)
Now, gently tap the iron and take a test cut.
Keep doing that until it takes a nice shaving. (“Nice” depends on what you are trying to do.)
You can make the blade go back in a bit by tapping on the heel of the plane but that takes a careful touch that comes from experience. It doesn’t take that much longer to loosen it up and start the process over.

-- Woodworking shouldn't cost a fortune: http://lowbudgetwoodworker.blogspot.com/

View Cosmicsniper's profile

Cosmicsniper

2199 posts in 1816 days


#9 posted 08-09-2011 04:10 PM

I have the LN rabbet/block plane. Pretty much the perfect plane; more useful than your standard block plane. That’s the direction I would go.

-- jay, www.allaboutastro.com

View WayneC's profile

WayneC

12290 posts in 2755 days


#10 posted 08-09-2011 04:36 PM

Scrub planes are used to remove a lot of stock. As David said they are a coarse tool. You can use a jack plane with a cambered blade to perform the same function. The camber helps to make the cuts easier.

I would make a Jack Plane and a Jointer plane if your looking to use them for normal shop tasks… (assuming you have already made a smoothing plane)

Do you have a photo of your block plane? It may not be too hard to restore.

-- We must guard our enthusiasm as we would our life - James Krenov

View David Kirtley's profile

David Kirtley

1281 posts in 1656 days


#11 posted 08-09-2011 07:11 PM

Jay,

Sorry to correct you, but the skew mouth #140 reproduction is the perfect plane. :) :)

If they weren’t so pricey :) Ohh, can I have left and right hand versions too??

The #507 type is nice but doesn’t have as many parts to tinker with and fondle.

-- Woodworking shouldn't cost a fortune: http://lowbudgetwoodworker.blogspot.com/

View Bertha's profile

Bertha

12951 posts in 1351 days


#12 posted 08-09-2011 07:43 PM

^I’m with David. I think the #140 is the best reproduction around today. I don’t find the price that offensive, given the quality of the casting and accessories. Wayne and I both want a few;)

-- My dad and I built a 65 chev pick up.I killed trannys in that thing for some reason-Hog

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Cosmicsniper

2199 posts in 1816 days


#13 posted 08-09-2011 08:28 PM

@David – Oh, heck yeah. Now you’re talking! Still, I love the ability to plane right up the the edge of a board. That’s hard to beat!

-- jay, www.allaboutastro.com

View David Kirtley's profile

David Kirtley

1281 posts in 1656 days


#14 posted 08-10-2011 01:53 AM

Jay:

They are rabbeting planes as well.

-- Woodworking shouldn't cost a fortune: http://lowbudgetwoodworker.blogspot.com/

View Ritty's profile

Ritty

63 posts in 1455 days


#15 posted 08-10-2011 07:55 PM

actually guys i was thinking about what u have been saying about spending money on other things, so i got some patrolum jelly(think i spelled it wrong) and alot of sanding and it doesnt look to bad, a=now im gonna sharpen the blade ill let u guys know how it works out and post pictures, thx again guys and i like the scccrub plane idea, i think ill make one thx again guys ill get back to ya

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