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I want to build a boat!!!

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Forum topic by HuntleyBill posted 1086 days ago 2661 views 1 time favorited 22 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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HuntleyBill

86 posts in 1691 days


1086 days ago

Hello fellow Lumberjocks:

I am considering building a small wooden boat. Why? Because no one told me I couldn’t and because I have never done it! Two great reason. After some web research, I came accross the Minimost ( www.minimost.com ) This boat to me looks like a blast. Inexpensive to build and can be easily pulled behind my 1930 Ford Model A.

Looking through their website I found that some of the boat lumber is fir. During my last visit to my Big Box store, I asked if they had fir and the guy mentioned sure but it’s mixed in with the pine an spruce 2xX stock.

Being the wood novice that I am, I said to myself….self, is fir, spruce, pine all the same or very similar? Then I thaught, fir tree….pine tree. Then I started humming Christmas tunes but that’s another post!

So…I have two questions…

  • Is fir, pine etc. the same or VERY similar stuff?
  • Has ayone else built these or similar boats?

The posts on these forums have not been used since 2006-2007 so I don’t know if they are even active any more and I have a lot more question specific to the building of these kind of boats.

Looks like a fun project

-- If you think you can, or think you can't...your right!


22 replies so far

View samual's profile

samual

1 post in 1086 days


#1 posted 1086 days ago

Hey Huntley,
I believe that this article can help you decide:
http://www.smallboatplansreview.com/boat-building-tools-tips/what-is-the-best-wood-for-boat-building

good luck!

S

View SSMDad's profile

SSMDad

395 posts in 1198 days


#2 posted 1086 days ago

Here’s the one I want… err… want to build! Lord Nelson’s Flagship at the Battle of Trafalgar!

Rule Britannia!

(yeah I want all 104 working guns too!!) Not asking too much is it? :)

-- Chris ~~Who controls the past controls the future. Who controls the present controls the past."

View David Kirtley's profile

David Kirtley

1276 posts in 1599 days


#3 posted 1086 days ago

In this case, fir, pine or cedar could be used. Not much of a difference.

The techniques are pretty dated in comparison to modern plywood boat construction.

The plywood could be improved on. If available, I would go with a real marine plywood for longevity. Better plywood would also allow you to go thinner and lighter and still be stronger. At least baltic birch or other well sealed hardwood plywood with exterior glue. If you go with the fir ply, you will need to glass the whole thing because the fir ply will check.

Epoxy is easier to work with and more forgiving than Weldwood.

I would also add some enclosed flotation to have something to hang on to when that puppy goes airborne and comes back butter side down.

-- Woodworking shouldn't cost a fortune: http://lowbudgetwoodworker.blogspot.com/

View rance's profile

rance

4125 posts in 1762 days


#4 posted 1086 days ago

Bill, Hopefully ‘Shipwright’ here on LJ will chime in. He used to build boats. You might also contact ‘tyvekboy’ here on LJ. He uses tyvek for boatbuilding.

-- Backer boards, stop blocks, build oversized, and never buy a hand plane--

View Lee Barker's profile

Lee Barker

2163 posts in 1452 days


#5 posted 1086 days ago

I have built the Nutshell Pram, a Joel White design. It was a successful outing. Not sexy like the hydroplane.

Boat plans are highly refined documents. You can mess with a table design, but unless you’re an expert, you’re wise to stay with the exact specs of a boat plan.

And if you’ve never built a boat before, and do, I suspect you’ll discover this interesting factoid: Everything else I’ve built has started from the wall or the floor. A boat starts at a point in space. Go for it!

Kindly,

Lee

-- "...in his brain, which is as dry as the remainder biscuit after a voyage, he hath strange places cramm'd with observation, the which he vents in mangled forms." --Shakespeare, "As You Like It"

View HuntleyBill's profile

HuntleyBill

86 posts in 1691 days


#6 posted 1086 days ago

Thank you all for your help. This design is decades old and thus the wood choice is dated. One of the many reasons I come to the experts. Yes…that’s YOU! If there is a better choice of wood, you guys would know it. I’ve had suggestions of luan instead of ply etc. I don’t know if that is viable or not.

Also, I wanted this boat to be able to accommodate 2 people. So I figured I would enlarge it from 8 feet to 10 feet and maybe go a little wider. So, if going from 8 to 10 feet is a 25% increase in length, does that mean I go 25% wider and deeper???? I’m beginning to realize why I don’t sleep well!

-- If you think you can, or think you can't...your right!

View David Kirtley's profile

David Kirtley

1276 posts in 1599 days


#7 posted 1085 days ago

Changing stuff is a slippery slope. You will always be plagued with adding more here and there.

Going from 8’ to 10’ introduces scarfing plywood. Not that hard to do but another skill to learn.

Lost of times people go length only for enlarging. It does sometimes change the bracing as well. For go fast boats, you have to be careful because you can make things that will trip up the boat and make it tend not turn well or safely.

Glen-L has similar designs that are bigger.

For your first one, I strongly suggest going from someone else’s plans and build to spec. Then start changing to your liking on the next ones. (There will be more. It is addictive.)

You want a go fast boat to carry more people and look good behind a model A, A Bolger Sneakeasy would be sexy.

-- Woodworking shouldn't cost a fortune: http://lowbudgetwoodworker.blogspot.com/

View SSMDad's profile

SSMDad

395 posts in 1198 days


#8 posted 1085 days ago

Sorry Samual. It was supposed to be a joke. (though I really wouldn’t mind having it)
I’ve been interested in building a little boat too so I’m glad you asked this.

Cheers!

-- Chris ~~Who controls the past controls the future. Who controls the present controls the past."

View helluvawreck's profile

helluvawreck

15431 posts in 1468 days


#9 posted 1085 days ago

Building a boat is something that I have always wanted to do and I have two or three very good books on it that I have probably had for 20 years. However, at 61 and with more directions that I would like to take up in woodworking it is doubtful that I will ever build one. I say go ahead and build one while you can. It may be the only opportunity that you will ever have.

-- If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer. Let him step to the music which he hears, however measured or far away. Henry David Thoreau

View crank49's profile

crank49

3338 posts in 1572 days


#10 posted 1085 days ago

I can remember that design from when I was just becoming an engineer. I wanted to built that very boat; even got plans, I believe. I changed my mind whan I saw one flip and land “butter side down” on Wheeler Lake.Those things are very finicky, almost low flying airplanes. I wouldn’t dream of getting away from the original design at all; except to use more modern materials.

-- Michael :-{| “If you tell a big enough lie and tell it frequently enough, it will be believed.” ― A H

View HuntleyBill's profile

HuntleyBill

86 posts in 1691 days


#11 posted 1085 days ago

Ok Ok…you talked me out of that boat. I’m now looking at the Glen-L TNT design. 11 foot and built for 2 with a little extra room for the dog!

Then there was the suggestion of instead of an outboard, use a jet ski motor and pump! I love it! hmmmmm 750 cc, 1000, 1200????? decisions decisions.

I’m going to have to name the boat after Lumberjocks for all the good help and advice. There is another idea…a naming contest!!

-- If you think you can, or think you can't...your right!

View David Kirtley's profile

David Kirtley

1276 posts in 1599 days


#12 posted 1085 days ago

If you look at the inboard ones, they have the 11’ Dyno Jet already designed for powering with jetski propulsion.

-- Woodworking shouldn't cost a fortune: http://lowbudgetwoodworker.blogspot.com/

View shipwright's profile

shipwright

4843 posts in 1399 days


#13 posted 1084 days ago

I hope you do build, Bill.

My advice for anyone in your position (as per my PM to you) would be to seek out plans from a respected designer who specializes in designs for, or at least caters to novice builders. They will give you lots of info that most designers assume that the builder already knows.

Glen-L is certainly in that group.

-- Paul M ..............If God wanted us to have fiberglass boats he would have given us fiberglass trees. http://prmdesigns.com/

View Dan Lyke's profile

Dan Lyke

1469 posts in 2726 days


#14 posted 1083 days ago

I’m gonna go the other way on this one. This spring I competed for the first time in the Bodega Bay Fisherman’s Festival Boat Building Competition. 2 sheets of 3/8” ply, a couple o’ 2×2s, a stack of 1×2s, a sheet of plastic, a pound of 1” wood screws, a pound of nails, a few tubes of caulk, a few other things.

Add 4 people on your team, 3 hours, battery powered drill drivers and hand tools. And then you race.

My takeaway from all of this is that you can build a nice little paddleable boat that’ll last you for a summer for $30 and an afternoon.

Pictures from our build (follow the link on the bottom to go further).

That basic experience taught me a lot about boats and boat building, the value of plans, but mostly the value of saying “yeah, this afternoon I’m going to build a boat”.

-- Dan Lyke, Petaluma California, http://www.flutterby.net/User:DanLyke

View rance's profile

rance

4125 posts in 1762 days


#15 posted 1080 days ago

Dan, I have to admit, that there looks like a LOT of fun. A nice Father/Son project. Or a Father/Daughter project. Now the determining question to Bill is “How long do you want your boat to last?”.

-- Backer boards, stop blocks, build oversized, and never buy a hand plane--

showing 1 through 15 of 22 replies

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