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Jointer - Stripped screws to remove blade, help!

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Forum topic by timtoggs posted 09-20-2018 03:57 PM 341 views 0 times favorited 14 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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timtoggs

3 posts in 25 days


09-20-2018 03:57 PM

I recently got my first jointer and after a few uses, I ended up getting a piece of maple stuck in the blade. I tried removing the blade so I could take it out, but ended up stripping the hex screws (2 out of the 4). I tried using a dremel to remove part of the screw to give me some space to use a flathead, but that didn’t work.

I don’t know what to do! Did I ruin it forever? Help!


14 replies so far

View jmos's profile

jmos

866 posts in 2511 days


#1 posted 09-20-2018 05:16 PM

That sucks. I’m not machinist, but a couple thoughts:

Have you tried a screw extractor? (Can’t recommend that brand, just wanted to show an example.)

Another option is to drill out the screw, tap the head to the next screw size up, and get new screws. (assuming the blades can accommodate the larger size.)

Any chance you were thinking of upgrading to a spiral cutter head? Now would be the perfect time. Then you can just junk the old head, stripped screws and all.

Depending on the make and model, you might be able to find someone who has upgraded their head and would part with the old, straight knife head, for cheap.

-- John

View squazo's profile

squazo

103 posts in 1786 days


#2 posted 09-20-2018 05:31 PM

cut a straight slot in it and use a flat head screwdriver

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HokieKen

6246 posts in 1280 days


#3 posted 09-20-2018 05:45 PM

Screw extractor like jmos linked is best bet. If that doesn’t work, you may be able to drill it out and re-tap. But I doubt it. Pull the head and take it to a machine shop. They’ll fix you up.

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

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timtoggs

3 posts in 25 days


#4 posted 09-20-2018 05:51 PM

Appreciate the feedback, guys! I’ll start with the screw extractor first. Hope that does the trick for me!

View Oxford's profile

Oxford

19 posts in 26 days


#5 posted 09-20-2018 06:07 PM

You want to be careful to only drill the screw and not drill into the threads. Once you drill into the threads, you’ll have to machine the hole for a Helicoil to repair it.

If you are not comfortable drilling the screw (I find I usually screw it up), just take cutter head to a machine shop that specializes in removing broken or damaged fasteners. They can quickly set it up in a mill and drill the fastener for an extractor. It is also possible to insert a hex key in what is left of the slot and weld the key to the screw, then it will just turn out, but best to have someone who knows what they are doing do this. Lastly, specialty machine shops can use Electrical Disintegration Machining which uses an electrical discharge to remove the core of the screw, then they just pull out the spiral metal left in the threads.

People break off and damage screws all the time so there is always some local shop that specializes in removing the damaged fasteners. Ask around and you’ll find one in your local area.

Lastly, sometimes it is less expensive to replace the assembly so keep that in mind, particularly if you have been thinking of upgrading to a helical cutter head.

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Oxford

19 posts in 26 days


#6 posted 09-20-2018 06:57 PM

Here is another thought. The head of the screw holds down the blade and hold down bar. You should be able to carefully grind off the screw heads. Then the holddown bar and the blade will slip off over the remainder of the screw. The screws should stick up about the thickness of the blade and bar so you should be able to turn them out with a vice grip or even a needle nose or even your fingers since there will no longer be any tension on them. Worst case you might need to replace the bar if you grind into it.

If you decide to drill it, use a left hand drill. Often they catch and spin out the screw. I don’t like drilling as it is too easy to drill into the threads if you don’t get the setup just right. I’ve screwed up too many threads trying to remove broken or damaged fasteners so I tend to hand it to a professional who has the patience to do the setup right so the threads are not damaged. In the end it costs me less in both time and money.

View Andybb's profile (online now)

Andybb

1267 posts in 745 days


#7 posted 09-20-2018 07:00 PM

One thing that worked for me for the exact same problem on a planer was to use a torx bit. Select a size that fits snugly and put it on the end of an extension and tap it in with a hammer so it’s wedged in there. If you have it a little valve grinding compound on the end of the bit helps.

-- Andy - Seattle USA

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Aj2

1712 posts in 1939 days


#8 posted 09-20-2018 07:06 PM

What a mess, I would look for a different jointer why is there a hole where the chip breaker needs to remove chips.
And your knives look like they project too far out.
Something is off with the machine

-- Aj

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timtoggs

3 posts in 25 days


#9 posted 09-20-2018 07:15 PM

Yea, it’s the cheapest jointer you can get off of Amazon. Wasn’t ready to invest a lot for my first one in my small workshop.

View Oxford's profile

Oxford

19 posts in 26 days


#10 posted 09-20-2018 07:36 PM

There is a Powermatic 053 on eBay for $399 with local pickup. Watch for deals like that.
I held out for a longbed. Usually costs a little more. But I eventually got it.

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Aj2

1712 posts in 1939 days


#11 posted 09-20-2018 09:13 PM

Wood chips between the face of the knife and chip breaker Is a bad sign. If you do keep it replace mangled screws with Original screws from manufacturer.
Good luck

-- Aj

View BFamous's profile

BFamous

166 posts in 262 days


#12 posted 09-20-2018 10:04 PM

This won’t help you for the stripped heads, but you may want to get an impact driver… Essentially a screw driver designed that when you smash the end of the handle with a hammer, it turns ever do slightly. I find my extremely useful for loosening all sorts of stuck screws with little fear of stripping the heads.

-- Brian Famous :: Charlotte, NC :: http://www.FamousArtisan.com

View fuigb's profile

fuigb

511 posts in 3099 days


#13 posted 09-21-2018 12:24 AM

OP, you need a millwright unless you know metal. Hit social media to find a local retiree who misses the shop (the plant to you guys not from the midwest).

-- - Crud. Go tell your mother that I need a Band-aid.

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fuigb

511 posts in 3099 days


#14 posted 09-21-2018 12:24 AM

Double post

-- - Crud. Go tell your mother that I need a Band-aid.

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