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Has anyone tried "seasoning" an old vintage plane like a pan instead of "japanning"

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Forum topic by SMP posted 09-20-2018 02:37 PM 1316 views 0 times favorited 13 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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SMP

121 posts in 108 days


09-20-2018 02:37 PM

I picked up an old Stanley 19 at an estate sale that most of the japanning is gone. In looking at how to re-japan it looks somewhat of a pain to get the materials(have to order more than I need of stuff on ebay) and then possibly dangerous, or making the oven smell of toxic chemicals. Well, it seems the process of japanning is somewhat related to seasoning cast iron, only japanning you are purposely trying to make it more black without regard for chemicals that you don’t want on your cookware. So I thought, maybe I could just season this plane, possibly adding some black tint/dye to the oil? Has anyone tried this? THe following is the science based method I used to season my cast iron pans and skillets and works great, and the author also describes black rust, which may help as well. Has anyone tried this? I may give it a shot since I need to re-season one of my skillets anyways. just not sure what I could add to make it blacker without ruing the oil polymerization.

Seasoning: http://sherylcanter.com/wordpress/2010/01/a-science-based-technique-for-seasoning-cast-iron/

Black rust/magentite: http://sherylcanter.com/wordpress/2010/02/black-rust-and-cast-iron-seasoning/


13 replies so far

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Waldo88

207 posts in 1499 days


#1 posted 09-20-2018 04:38 PM

I just use black engine block spray paint. Works great. Can get it at auto stores.

Paint technology is a wee bit more advanced nowadays than it was when Stanley bought the Bailey patents.

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squazo

111 posts in 1847 days


#2 posted 09-20-2018 05:33 PM

might work but my cast iron is always oily, which helps prevent rust and keeps food from sticking. would probably leave terrible stains on you work

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SMP

121 posts in 108 days


#3 posted 09-20-2018 05:52 PM



might work but my cast iron is always oily, which helps prevent rust and keeps food from sticking. would probably leave terrible stains on you work

- squazo

I used to have problems with that oiliness too when following other methods. The method I linked though works perfectly, the oil I use completely polymerizes into like a hard plastic my fingernails can’t even scratch. I would HIGHLY suggest this for anyone with cast iron cookware.

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JayT

5961 posts in 2413 days


#4 posted 09-20-2018 05:54 PM


Well, it seems the process of japanning is somewhat related to seasoning cast iron, only japanning you are purposely trying to make it more black without regard for chemicals that you don t want on your cookware.

- SMP

Not really. Japanning is a thick layer of a very hard and durable asphaltum finish that not just resists rust, but also various chemicals and abrasion. With seasoning, you are baking oil into the open pores of the cast iron, while japanning covers them over completely into a smooth finish. The only real similarity is that both use heat as a curing mechanism.

If you are just curious, go ahead and try it. Just be careful with heating and cooling of cast iron to prevent warping. For a user plane, though, either just keeping it oiled &/or waxed will keep rust at bay or go the spray paint route. Any heating and cooling of cast iron must be done carefully to prevent warping.

-- In matters of style, swim with the current; in matters of principle, stand like a rock. Thomas Jefferson

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HokieKen

7127 posts in 1341 days


#5 posted 09-20-2018 05:55 PM



I just use black engine block spray paint. Works great. Can get it at auto stores.

Paint technology is a wee bit more advanced nowadays than it was when Stanley bought the Bailey patents.

- Waldo88


+1 All of my planes that had significant loss of the original Japanning got a few coats of Duplicolor. It isn’t orignal but you’d never know by looking at it. I give some detail on how I go about it in this blog post.

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

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HokieKen

7127 posts in 1341 days


#6 posted 09-20-2018 06:02 PM

On the other hand, you could just go all out like JayT did :-) I thought I was going to give it a go at some point but, like most things, the time I need and the time I have don’t quite mesh…

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

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shampeon

1885 posts in 2385 days


#7 posted 09-20-2018 06:12 PM

I guess I don’t really see the point of doing this, and there’s a non-zero chance of causing warpage of the cast iron. It’ll be hard to keep the machined surfaces from being coated, too. But, you know, go ahead and try it if you really want.

-- ian | "You can't stop what's coming. It ain't all waiting on you. That's vanity."

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HokieKen

7127 posts in 1341 days


#8 posted 09-20-2018 06:18 PM

JayT and Ian make good points about warpage. Cast Iron, especially when cast thin, likes to move with temperature. I just realized this is a block plane. Which probably makes it less likely to warp but also makes any warpage more of a problem since the frog is cast in. Just another thought…

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

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SMP

121 posts in 108 days


#9 posted 09-20-2018 06:23 PM

Not really. Japanning is a thick layer of a very hard and durable asphaltum finish that not just resists rust, but also various chemicals and abrasion. With seasoning, you are baking oil into the open pores of the cast iron, while japanning covers them over completely into a smooth finish. The only real similarity is that both use heat as a curing mechanism.

I used to think that too about seasoning until I learned to do it correctly. Take a look at the first post I linked. Its the BLO in your mixture that is polymerizing that creates the hard thick coating(same as what seasoning correctly with flax oil does). The asphalt provides a nice color though. I may try it without pigment just to see, so now to keep it from warping. I think I read somewhere about letting it cool slowly with the oven door cracked open on low.

edit, just read that it needs to get to ~1500 degrees to warp, I should be ok at 500 then. no chance my oven would ever get that hot, lol

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lumbering_on

574 posts in 692 days


#10 posted 09-20-2018 06:26 PM


I used to have problems with that oiliness too when following other methods. The method I linked though works perfectly, the oil I use completely polymerizes into like a hard plastic my fingernails can t even scratch. I would HIGHLY suggest this for anyone with cast iron cookware.

- SMP

I actually followed this article back about five years ago, and it’s great for cast iron pans.

That being said, it seems rather unnecessary for a plane as you don’t need to use something food-safe to protect it. I’d suggest just painting it, as this will stop the rust and will keep the black appearance.

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SMP

121 posts in 108 days


#11 posted 09-20-2018 06:34 PM



I actually followed this article back about five years ago, and it s great for cast iron pans.

That being said, it seems rather unnecessary for a plane as you don t need to use something food-safe to protect it. I d suggest just painting it, as this will stop the rust and will keep the black appearance.

- lumbering_on

Haha, yeah I should have clarified, I was mainly thinking about this due to the smells using the kitchen oven(and fire/explosion danger). My wife would freak out if I was using jappanning mixture in the kitchen oven on 500 degrees for an hour, whereas with flax oil I am just seasoning our cooking pans.

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SMP

121 posts in 108 days


#12 posted 09-20-2018 06:35 PM

duplicate

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Woodknack

12431 posts in 2582 days


#13 posted 09-20-2018 07:04 PM

Give it a shot, not like block planes are rare. You are risking very little and may learn a lot.

-- Rick M, http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

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