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Forum topic by doyoulikegumwood posted 1069 days ago 967 views 0 times favorited 15 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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doyoulikegumwood

384 posts in 2575 days


1069 days ago

So I know I haven’t been on for a while now. Life got in the way. but heres the skinny, so I lost my home to a bungled up citi financial scam for home loan modification. now I’m upset about losing my house But I’m down right crushed at losing my beloved workshop. long story short I moved back into my rental.

So hears the problem the only work space I have here is the basement its plenty big enough (I worked in it for 10 years before buying my new home with a dedicated shop) But the basement windows leak like sieves and I have no idea how to replace them. Would I be best off hiring a pro to do this or is this something that is fairly easy to figure out.

I’m not even going to move any of my machines in tell I can get the moister problem solved. Every time it rains i have puddles down there.

any advise would be helpful

thanks

Jason

-- I buy tools so i can make more money,so ican buy more tools so I can work more, to make more money, so I can buy more tool, so I can work more


15 replies so far

View paoh's profile

paoh

8 posts in 1097 days


#1 posted 1069 days ago

Window boxes are sold at big box stores. Kind of like window umbrellas. Also lava rock holds quite a bit of moisture back so u could fill the window base with that as well. As far as replacing the Windows of should be a snap as long as the Windows are a common replacement size.

View timthetoolman's profile

timthetoolman

41 posts in 1911 days


#2 posted 1069 days ago

I wouldn’t worry about the windows too much. just screw them in on the sides and caulk the edges. and yes, i would have a window cover on the outside for precautions.

-- Tim The Toolman Dayton, Ohio

View Bertha's profile

Bertha

12951 posts in 1276 days


#3 posted 1069 days ago

Real drag about the home. It’s happening everywhere. I hired a pro to do mine but having watched him do it, I could have easily done it myself. They looked perfectly standard and popped right in. River rocks over lava rocks, a box, and tons of sealant. I never had a moisture problem, but I was finding bugs that weren’t invited. I think you can handle this one. Is there a sump pump down there? A good dehumidification unit WITH an effluent hose to the outside might be in order.

-- My dad and I built a 65 chev pick up.I killed trannys in that thing for some reason-Hog

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doyoulikegumwood

384 posts in 2575 days


#4 posted 1069 days ago

As far as drainage goes there are floor drains and a 60 pint dehumidifier. I put in new window wells about 6 years ago and that worked on 4 of the six windows but on 2 of them the windows are such bad shape replacement of the window it self is about the only option at this point.

thanks for all advice

jason

-- I buy tools so i can make more money,so ican buy more tools so I can work more, to make more money, so I can buy more tool, so I can work more

View Grandpa's profile

Grandpa

3031 posts in 1258 days


#5 posted 1069 days ago

Windows are fairly simple and straight forward as long as things go as they should. When things don’t go smoothly then ….well they don’t go smoothly. Get some help measuring for the new windows if you haven’t done this before. I order the windows by size. I measure them before I remove the old window from the wall. Use lots of polyurethane caulk. It is the best. I have put in several sets of windows in older homes and it has always worked. Some was more work than others. I have put them in a basement. You can probably do it if you will persevere.

View KayBee's profile

KayBee

998 posts in 1829 days


#6 posted 1069 days ago

Why can’t you get the landlord to fix them? That much water in the basement will cause mold and other issues. Landlords have a legal responability to keep their property safe and healthy. It’s also protecting his investment.

Sorry about losing your home and shop.

-- Karen - a little bit of stupid goes a long way

View TheDane's profile

TheDane

3627 posts in 2246 days


#7 posted 1069 days ago

Depending on when the house was built, you might have some luck finding replacements at the big box. Installing them isn’t difficult at all.

—Gerry

-- Gerry -- "I don't plan to ever really grow up ... I'm just going to learn how to act in public!"

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Grandpa

3031 posts in 1258 days


#8 posted 1069 days ago

KayBee, reread that post and it implies he is the landlord. Be careful pointing fingers…..HA

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KayBee

998 posts in 1829 days


#9 posted 1068 days ago

Well, I guess he’s getting the landlord to fix things then, isn’t he? Not trying to point fingers. I know that most LJs just like to get it done. And even enjoy a job well done. Sometimes to the point that it’s not in their wallets best interest. (Yes, maybe I’ve done that a time or dozen…)

-- Karen - a little bit of stupid goes a long way

View rusty2010's profile

rusty2010

125 posts in 1140 days


#10 posted 1068 days ago

Jason, My company has installed hundreds of replacement windows. Yes it is easy for a person with a few skills. I really need more info and a pic if possible. Is the window going between blocks or framing, where is the grade line, is there a window well, how deep is the well, does the grade slope away good, can you put a awning over the well, is the wall exposed for easy measurements?
Big box windows are fine. Check, recheck and check again on your measurements. There should be a sloping sill at the bottom of the window, it may be brick or a mortar wash. The well is a main concern, where does that water go to when it rains? The ground in that well is hard pan and probably does not drain good. make sure the grade there is well below the window sill and make sure your exterior has sufficient grade slope away from the house, check your gutters too.

-- check, recheck then check again

View doyoulikegumwood's profile

doyoulikegumwood

384 posts in 2575 days


#11 posted 1066 days ago

well I’ll adress a few questions. Yes I am the land lord after finding this problem in the basement I feel like a slum lord, but not to much like a slum lord cuz it has never been pointed out to me by any tenets. I have installed many windows but never installed windows in brick wich is where I am lost. I recently replaced all the window wells hopeing this would fix the problem and it did on all but 2 of the six windows.

The house is in need of new gutters, the current ones cannot handle anything more then a drizzle of rain. this will be addressed at a later date when more funds are available.

the two windows in question need replacing no matter what one is nothing more then ply wood and the other is plexi both of these repairs were done before I owned the home and I had planed on fixing them long ago but it sliped my mind.

My hope is to stop the water long enough to get the gutters replaced so i can get back to work and not destroy my machines in the process.

-- I buy tools so i can make more money,so ican buy more tools so I can work more, to make more money, so I can buy more tool, so I can work more

View rusty2010's profile

rusty2010

125 posts in 1140 days


#12 posted 1066 days ago

Replacing windows in brick is not hard. Check the opening rsquareness. When measuring, deduct 3/8” from actual width and height. example, if it measures 20”x32-1/2”, order 19-5/8”x321/8”. There should be holes for attatching the windows. You can use Tap-Cons or pre-drill for dowels and conventional screws. Fill the gap with insulation and caulk the edges. It will hold. Don’t use foam insulation, it will warp the window. Make sure the sill is good, sloping away from the window. Good luck

-- check, recheck then check again

View Bertha's profile

Bertha

12951 posts in 1276 days


#13 posted 1066 days ago

^I wish I’d met Rusty before I spray caulked a window. It will indeed buckle an aluminum frame.

-- My dad and I built a 65 chev pick up.I killed trannys in that thing for some reason-Hog

View Grandpa's profile

Grandpa

3031 posts in 1258 days


#14 posted 1066 days ago

I have a friend that was building a new home back when the spray foam was a pretty new product. He had the tripple expanding foam. He got his door to swing like a story book installation. He got impatient and sprayed it full of foam and closed it. When he got ready to leave the door was jammed tight and he couldn’t open it.
Today they make a special single expanding foam for doors and windows but be cautious and fill slowly. A thin layer and let it work. come back and spray again.
I have replaced windows in brick homes and it is a little more work to the the old window frame out but it installs as easy as a wood clad home.

View rsdowdy's profile

rsdowdy

105 posts in 1778 days


#15 posted 1065 days ago

That triple expanding foam is great stuff! Heres an idea I did that someone can submit to one of the garden magazines if you’d like. I have a DR Mower with the 14” wheels. Well, I ran over some wire and my tire got shot through and through…no help patching it and using a tube would be worthless on a wheel that gets stuck quite often (COunted 17 holes in the tire). So I drilled 6 3/8th inch holes around the tiire and filled it with the foam. The foam should come out all the holes and push all the air out. Let it harden a day, clean up the yellow mess, and walaa, as good as new. Been using it 4 months without a hitch. 3.58 vs 60.00 for a new tire. Oh, and work over newspaper, or in a box..the stuff is messy!

Royal

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