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Low angle Type 62 planes

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Forum topic by wingate_52 posted 08-05-2011 01:24 AM 3588 views 0 times favorited 29 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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wingate_52

224 posts in 2034 days


08-05-2011 01:24 AM

Topic tags/keywords: plane

I look foward to some customer reviews of these tools. Having worked with wood for over 50 years, I have never needed such a tool, managing with the usual blade down planes, and scrapers. I don’t resort to abrasives and power sanders. I was taught how to use and sharpen a scraper as a kid at school and have used them extensively. However after recently sorting out my planes, I may find a use for one on my bench. Are they useful, I have tried both Veritas and L-N models and found them to be brilliant, but do I really need one? Ihave self-control.


29 replies so far

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David Kirtley

1286 posts in 2463 days


#1 posted 08-05-2011 02:25 AM

Well for the most part, they did not survive in the marketplace when they were originally developed. They were pretty much relegated to flattening end grain butcher block.

They have been marketed as a stylish bench decoration but so far, I have not felt the need for one either. I can think of a lot of other cool planes I would go for first. If I were making cutting boards, I might feel different.

-- Woodworking shouldn't cost a fortune: http://lowbudgetwoodworker.blogspot.com/

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WayneC

12642 posts in 3562 days


#2 posted 08-05-2011 03:53 AM

They are pretty useful planes. Very nice in a shooting board…. And they are as David said stylish.

Stanley #62 and LN Low Angle Jack Plane

-- We must guard our enthusiasm as we would our life - James Krenov

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wingate_52

224 posts in 2034 days


#3 posted 08-07-2011 08:53 PM

Pretty nice planes, but similar a finish can be achieved by other methods. I like the idea of using one in a shooting board, low angle and end grain. I could use it on tricky guitar body woods to achieve a quicker/better finish. Still undecided. Rather than the L-N and Veritas brands, the WoodRiver Quangseng brand are available over here in a nice spec complete with 3 blades for £125, tempting.

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WayneC

12642 posts in 3562 days


#4 posted 08-07-2011 09:01 PM

Might be worth giving a try. I’ve not handled a Quangseng Brand plane.

-- We must guard our enthusiasm as we would our life - James Krenov

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wingate_52

224 posts in 2034 days


#5 posted 08-07-2011 09:03 PM

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WayneC

12642 posts in 3562 days


#6 posted 08-07-2011 09:14 PM

Looks like a bargin if the finish is as nice as it looks in the photo. The 3 blades are also a big factor from a value perspective. I would guess replacements blades would run £25 or so each.

-- We must guard our enthusiasm as we would our life - James Krenov

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wingate_52

224 posts in 2034 days


#7 posted 08-07-2011 09:53 PM

I would think that you would get a lifetime of use out of the 3 inclusive blades.

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WayneC

12642 posts in 3562 days


#8 posted 08-07-2011 09:57 PM

Probably even 1. With 3 blades you can grind them at different angles for different tasks.

-- We must guard our enthusiasm as we would our life - James Krenov

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Brett

660 posts in 2148 days


#9 posted 08-08-2011 01:48 AM

David Kirtley makes a good point. Common planes are common for a reason—they proved their usefulness over a long period of time. Similarly, rare planes are rare because there wasn’t much demand for them; either they didn’t work well, or their user base was limited.

I try to remind myself of that when I start salivating over a #55 or some other oddball plane being sold on eBay.

-- More tools, fewer machines.

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Derek Cohen

296 posts in 3433 days


#10 posted 08-09-2011 06:41 PM

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WayneC

12642 posts in 3562 days


#11 posted 08-10-2011 12:48 AM

I’m not sure I would put a #62 in the category of a failed plane or one that does not work well…..

-- We must guard our enthusiasm as we would our life - James Krenov

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David Kirtley

1286 posts in 2463 days


#12 posted 08-10-2011 05:26 AM

Not failed in design, just not a big enough marketshare to keep in production. More than likely due more to popularity of design elements. Exposed joinery is really one of its best uses now and that was not that stylish until fairly recently. It also depends on what kind of wood you are using. People were doing a lot with veneers and hidden joinery and that didn’t make it stand out as a necessary tool. Highly figured woods generally call for high angle planes. It seems to me (purely hypothetical) that it was just in the wrong place at the wrong time.

-- Woodworking shouldn't cost a fortune: http://lowbudgetwoodworker.blogspot.com/

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Loren

8309 posts in 3112 days


#13 posted 08-10-2011 06:29 AM

I’ve had the L-N low angle jack for years and while it’s a very nice plane,
I don’t find it works better than a well-tuned and sharp Bailey jack, even
on end grain. It may have a slight edge on plywood, but depth adjustments
and camber issues are enough of a hassle to dissuade me from using it
much.

Different people have different preferences. I don’t use block planes
nearly as much as some people either. I’ll often grab a smoother and
use it one-handed where many people would reach for a block plane.

View wingate_52's profile

wingate_52

224 posts in 2034 days


#14 posted 08-11-2011 01:49 PM

I have had a disapointing time planing a piece of Bubinga, grain all over the place. A fine set Rob Cosman in a highly tuned Stanley no.5 with minimal mouth. Diagonal, straight, reverse, hopeless. For the few occasions , a 62 type may be the answer.

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Bertha

13003 posts in 2158 days


#15 posted 08-11-2011 02:43 PM

^I would totally disagree that the #62 is a failure in any way. But there’s certainly some truth to the argument that Wingate makes about scrapers and other well-tuned planes. Learning how to truly use a scraper, either card or plane, is a skill that few possess (I certainly don’t). Paul Hamler is obsessive on this point and spent years developing his scraper insert. A giant low angle block plane works just like a giant low angle block plane. Although an expensive tool, it’s a very, very (very) desirable one to me.

-- My dad and I built a 65 chev pick up.I killed trannys in that thing for some reason-Hog

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