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Newbie + router table = difficulty controlling the piece

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Forum topic by boobird posted 09-17-2018 07:31 PM 709 views 0 times favorited 18 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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boobird

12 posts in 62 days


09-17-2018 07:31 PM

I’m attempting to create tongue/groove using the Freud 2 bit system.

Tongues are pretty easy to cut against the router table.

Grooves seem very difficult to lay flush against the fence. I’m getting a lot of resistance as I push thru. This is causing an uneven edge. Is this normal?

Should I push with a miter gauge?


18 replies so far

View chrisstef's profile

chrisstef

17682 posts in 3153 days


#1 posted 09-17-2018 07:39 PM

Smaller bites will help.

-- Its not a crack, its a casting imperfection.

View BuffaloBrewer's profile

BuffaloBrewer

59 posts in 965 days


#2 posted 09-17-2018 07:39 PM

If I’m picturing your set up right a following piece of scrap will help. If you are going deep you might find doing it in a couple passes will be easier too.

View Andybb's profile

Andybb

1280 posts in 750 days


#3 posted 09-17-2018 07:41 PM

Is this what you are using?

No experience with it but…
1. Is it possible you are running into the shaft because the fence is too far back?
2. I wouldn’t think that you’d use a miter gauge for a long edge but maybe for the end grain edge.
3. Are you trying to take too deep of a cut?? (probably not as most routers should be able to handle that)

Maybe someone could help if you posted a few pictures??

-- Andy - Seattle USA

View Waldo88's profile

Waldo88

207 posts in 1443 days


#4 posted 09-17-2018 07:46 PM

Take a few passes before you get to full depth on the groove (pretty much should always do this no matter what bit you are using).

View BFamous's profile

BFamous

167 posts in 267 days


#5 posted 09-17-2018 07:53 PM

Toss the router bit for the groove and use your table saw, with a dado blade if you have one…
I’ve always found the table saw is easier for cutting grooves (especially ones deeper than 1/4”) in a single pass.
You can also use the table saw to cut the tongues, but if you are having success with the router there, why change… You could actually run a two machine setup and just burn through the job once everything is calibrated properly.

-- Brian Famous :: Charlotte, NC :: http://www.FamousArtisan.com

View boobird's profile

boobird

12 posts in 62 days


#6 posted 09-17-2018 08:41 PM



Is this what you are using?

No experience with it but…
1. Is it possible you are running into the shaft because the fence is too far back?
2. I wouldn t think that you d use a miter gauge for a long edge but maybe for the end grain edge.
3. Are you trying to take too deep of a cut?? (probably not as most routers should be able to handle that)

Maybe someone could help if you posted a few pictures??

- Andybb

Yes I’m using that router bit. There is a bearing wheel on the shaft. The wood piece touches the bearing wheel..

View Rich's profile

Rich

3662 posts in 736 days


#7 posted 09-17-2018 09:31 PM

That should be easy in one pass. Since you mention fence, I’m assuming you’re using a fence and setting it flush with the bearing. If you aren’t, do that.

Second, I find it really hard to imagine you’re struggling to keep the board flat on the fence, even with the hardest woods. Even so, a feather board will help.

Finally, be sure the bit is sharp. I know it’s new, but Freud has surprised me a couple of times with things that slipped through inspection. Particularly since you mention the tongue bit works fine. If you were going to struggle with either, I’d expect it to be the tongue bit since it has two cutters.

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

View diverlloyd's profile

diverlloyd

3116 posts in 2003 days


#8 posted 09-17-2018 10:55 PM

Are you pushing the boards right to left or left to right? That’s while standing in front of the router table. It sounds like you are feeding from the wrong side. The proper side to feed from is the side that the router bit is rotating towards. That would be from the right to left on most router tables. That also forces the work piece to be pushed into the fence by the bit. The opposite way the bit forces the work piece away from the fence.

View Jeff's profile

Jeff

471 posts in 3341 days


#9 posted 09-17-2018 11:24 PM

If he was feeding backward he’d know it. The piece would pull drastically.

View CaptainKlutz's profile

CaptainKlutz

487 posts in 1640 days


#10 posted 09-18-2018 08:12 AM

hmm,
you have not shared type of wood used?

Hmm,
If tongue was easy to cut (using 2 cutters), why would groove (using 1 cutter) require more feed pressure? Groove/slot cutter is not touching the edges? Which edge is uneven?

Sorry to be dense, but the request for help does not compute?

Do you have any dust collection behind your router bit?
If slot gets jammed up with large chunks of saw dust (especially if try to feed too fast), it can interfere with cur speed and quality.

Pictures would be helpful.

-- I'm an engineer not a woodworker, but I can randomly find useful tools and furniture inside a pile of lumber!

View Tony_S's profile

Tony_S

923 posts in 3229 days


#11 posted 09-18-2018 08:43 AM

The cutters on the groove bit are probably on backwards/upside down.

-- It is the mark of an educated mind to be able to entertain a thought without accepting it. Aristotle

View boobird's profile

boobird

12 posts in 62 days


#12 posted 09-18-2018 01:10 PM

Sorry, I misspoke.

Tongues are difficult to cut. lots of resistance.
Grooves are easy and smooth

View Rich's profile

Rich

3662 posts in 736 days


#13 posted 09-18-2018 02:31 PM


Sorry, I misspoke.

Tongues are difficult to cut. lots of resistance.
Grooves are easy and smooth

- boobird

If it’s not already set this way, adjust the cutters so they are at 90º to one another so that both of them aren’t hitting the wood at the same time. It might not eliminate what you’re experiencing, but it will be smoother.

And, like I said earlier, use a feather board or two.

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

View WoodenDreams's profile

WoodenDreams

129 posts in 57 days


#14 posted 09-18-2018 06:28 PM

It also makes a difference on routing feed direction for control.

View rwe2156's profile

rwe2156

3092 posts in 1627 days


#15 posted 09-18-2018 07:16 PM

That’s a 1/2” shank so the depth has to be about 1/2” correct?

That’s an very deep cut on anybody’s router table.

Doing it in 2 passes will solve the problem.

The reason its harder is obvious: two cutters vs. one.

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

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