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Rockwell 28-350 bandsaw models

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Forum topic by Guswah posted 09-13-2018 04:45 AM 437 views 0 times favorited 10 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Guswah

29 posts in 645 days


09-13-2018 04:45 AM

Topic tags/keywords: bandsaw

I’m considering buying a Rockwell 28-350 20” bandsaw. When I look up the manuals for this old beast online, I see that there were three or four versions. The tag on the unit that I’m considering simply states Rockwell 28-350. The images I’ve found online all look pretty much like this one, but those images don’t specify which of the four models they represent.

Does anyone know how I would tell them apart, and what were the improvements in later models?

-- A woodworker's skill is usually proportional to the number of clamps he possesses.


10 replies so far

View Steve's profile

Steve

674 posts in 760 days


#1 posted 09-13-2018 01:59 PM

You might have good luck finding info over at http://vintagemachinery.org/

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Guswah

29 posts in 645 days


#2 posted 09-13-2018 02:01 PM

Been there. Nothing to be found that specifically identifies the models.

-- A woodworker's skill is usually proportional to the number of clamps he possesses.

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

7010 posts in 2377 days


#3 posted 09-13-2018 03:12 PM

AFAIK, Delta only made one 20” model 28-350 – introduced in 1951 and produced until around 1970. Manual can be found here:

20-inch Wood Cutting Band Saw Operation and Parts
PM-1707 Revised 5-15-56

(more parts lists and other documentation can be found here)
If you can get a serial number, you can date the machine and look up its catalog entry.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

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AHuxley

822 posts in 3499 days


#4 posted 09-13-2018 11:50 PM


AFAIK, Delta only made one 20” model 28-350 –

- MrUnix

There are 4 distinct variations of the 28-350, there is a A, B, C and D version. The general saw appears the same. Honestly unless one needs to replace the guides (there are 3 variations of how the guides attach) the variation makes no difference. You can determine the the version by dating the saw, the 28-350 was actually built prior to 1950 and those will have a A at the end of the serial number, the have the one potential big difference in that some fo the A series were made with CI wheels instead of AL. I have had maybe a dozen through the shop over the years the only time I paid attention to the variation was as I said changing guides. I have a soft spot for the saw since despite the Powermatic 81 being the better of the light duty steel spined 20” saws of the era the Delta just looks better and I just plain don’t like the Yates J-line saws.

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Guswah

29 posts in 645 days


#5 posted 09-27-2018 05:24 AM

Thank you, AHuxley. My serial number is 1397469. There are no letters accompanying either the model number or the serial number. I think my wheels are cast iron, assuming that the aluminum wheels are easy to identify.

It sounds as though replacement bearings require the correct version of the 28-350. Unless I can determine that, I’m reluctant to order those for fear I’ll just be sending them back.

-- A woodworker's skill is usually proportional to the number of clamps he possesses.

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MrUnix

7010 posts in 2377 days


#6 posted 09-27-2018 06:20 AM

Serial number puts it as a 1966 model. Bearings should be pretty standard 875xx type with extended inner races, but it’s always best to pull them and verify before ordering. There is no telling what a PO may have done in the past, and those are fairly easy to substitute with more common 62xx type bearings if the right shims are used.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

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Guswah

29 posts in 645 days


#7 posted 09-27-2018 09:00 PM

When I mentioned I’m considering replacement bearings, what I really meant was guide bearings. The others, only if required. AHuxley said that the saw’s model number has a bearing (no pun intended) on the correct guides to order. So again, I’m hungry to know which of the four models I might have.

Beyond the regular serial tag, I wonder if there are any other markings on the saw that would resolve the mystery.

-- A woodworker's skill is usually proportional to the number of clamps he possesses.

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Guswah

29 posts in 645 days


#8 posted 09-28-2018 04:08 AM

Here’s the tag.

-- A woodworker's skill is usually proportional to the number of clamps he possesses.

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Guswah

29 posts in 645 days


#9 posted 10-01-2018 05:30 AM

I stand corrected. I had a better look today and noticed that the upper and lower wheels are indeed aluminum. Not sure if that gets me any closer to knowing which of the four models it might be, but I thought I’d add that to my earlier description.

-- A woodworker's skill is usually proportional to the number of clamps he possesses.

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Guswah

29 posts in 645 days


#10 posted 10-03-2018 09:22 PM

I eventually found the answer to my own question for others who might have the same query. This image is from the Carter site, although it can be hard to find the exact page:

My saw, it turns out, is the A/B model.

-- A woodworker's skill is usually proportional to the number of clamps he possesses.

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