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Skew chisel

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Forum topic by TDSpade posted 09-12-2018 06:55 AM 724 views 0 times favorited 9 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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TDSpade

104 posts in 2590 days


09-12-2018 06:55 AM

As I am turning larger diameter vase sizes on my lathe, up to 6 inches for now. I was getting a few more catches with my one inch skew. I realized that I was running my planning cut too low and angle too steep. After adjusting for these problems I am good to go.

But I am wondering if should get a larger skew chisel for larger than 6 inch diameter spindle turnings? Any thoughts or recommendations would be appreciated.

-- For every expert, there is an equal and opposite expert.


9 replies so far

View Wildwood's profile

Wildwood

2449 posts in 2309 days


#1 posted 09-12-2018 10:05 AM

My Henry Taylor M2 1 1/4” skew bought back in the 1990’s a pleasure to use even though little shorter now. Over 1” skews are thicker and JMHO easier to use. With exception of Thompson tools would not look at exotic steel for a skew M2 HSS will work fine.
Although tool makers still make larger than 1” skews most vendors here may not stock them.

https://www.highlandwoodworking.com/crown1-14rollededgeskewchisel.aspx

http://www.packardwoodworks.com/Merchant2/merchant.mvc?Screen=PROD&Store_Code=packard&Product_Code=104543&Category_Code=tools-pn-skewch

http://www.packardwoodworks.com/Merchant2/merchant.mvc?Screen=PROD&Store_Code=packard&Product_Code=100012&Category_Code=tools-lacer

http://thompsonlathetools.com/product/1-14-skew/

-- Bill

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TDSpade

104 posts in 2590 days


#2 posted 09-13-2018 05:34 AM

Thanks Bill,
For the links and I think your right about bigger skews being better. I like that crown, I have 2 crown skews now. A 1 inch standard grind and ¾ inch with a rounded grind like that Lacer skew.

Terry

-- For every expert, there is an equal and opposite expert.

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Wildwood

2449 posts in 2309 days


#3 posted 09-13-2018 07:11 PM

Might want to practice little with your new skew if have some wood available before tackling your vase. Would not use that skew if already started hollowing that vase. While larger skew will do everything a smaller kew can do they excel at long thick blanks.

-- Bill

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TDSpade

104 posts in 2590 days


#4 posted 09-14-2018 04:57 AM

I did order the 1¼ inch crown. But I’ll start a new vase from scratch. And I’ll take it easy to get a feel for it.

Terry

-- For every expert, there is an equal and opposite expert.

View Lazyman's profile

Lazyman

2560 posts in 1562 days


#5 posted 09-14-2018 11:03 AM

Once you get your new skew, you might want to consider reshaping one of them to a curved edge on it, that is unless you bought one like that. I haven’t tried it yet myself, but it is supposed to be less likely to dig-in. Here is a good article on modifying a skew to this profile.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

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TDSpade

104 posts in 2590 days


#6 posted 09-14-2018 05:53 PM

My ¾ inch crown chisel is a radius grind. I do like it and use it mostly on wood that has a lot knots or grain changes.

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B001V9KOZA/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o01_s01?ie=UTF8&psc=1

Terry

-- For every expert, there is an equal and opposite expert.

View Wildwood's profile

Wildwood

2449 posts in 2309 days


#7 posted 09-17-2018 10:28 AM

Wouldn’t change my new skew to radius until got used to it if at all.

Raffin introduced me to he radius (round) skew back then, but he uses both regular skew and his signature skew. Then came Lacer and now Glenn Lucas witrh their signature skews.

Which is better, conventional or radius, or straight (square) bevel on a skew? Depends upon the turner and personal preference see video below. Best thing tool manufacturers did was put a rolled edge on sides of skew at the factory. Had to take my first skews to the grinder, to put rolled edge on sides of the skews. Back then rolled all four sides at the grinder.

Both Raffin & Lacer have made videoss and written article explaining how to modify your skew and use the tool.

https://www.popularwoodworking.com/techniques/reshaping-the-skew-chisel/

Skew bevels & angles varieties:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YFlZyGKYro4

Bottom line is learn to use the tool before changing!

-- Bill

View mot's profile

mot

4918 posts in 4211 days


#8 posted 09-25-2018 03:30 PM

Bill makes a good point. I had no confidence with my skew and spent some good shop time grinding it to a nice radius based on some article I read someplace. Now I have a pretty radiused skew that I still have no confidence with. I got spoiled with a Sorby Spindlemaster and it, quite frankly, kept me from spending the time needed to develop proficiency or at least confidence with the skew. I guess if you don’t feel good about using one of those lawn darts, putting a radius on it makes it a different colored lawn dart.

Cheers!

-- You can discover more about a person in an hour of play than in a year of conversation. (Plato)

View LeeMills's profile

LeeMills

610 posts in 1476 days


#9 posted 09-25-2018 04:49 PM

I guess either, straight or radius, works well when you get used to them.
Mine was straight and I went to radius (thanks Lacer); didn’t take but a few months and I ground it back to straight. I turn beads with the short point and it seems I know where it is better with straight….but maybe that is because I was used to straight. No difference with run-backs as far as I could tell.
It is much much easier for me to hone the straight compared to a radius. Some turners say they go back to the grinder after 3-4 hones but I go back after 3-4 months if that often. I only go back to deepen the hollow grind so that there is less to hone away. If not for that I would never go back to the grinder at all with a skew.
Remember years ago when barber shops also gave shaves? It always set me teeth on edge when I heard the grinder whirl up to sharpen the straight razor.

-- We cannot solve our problems with the same thinking we used when we created them. Albert Einstein

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