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Band saw blade wobble

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Forum topic by SharkeysEnd posted 09-10-2018 09:32 PM 607 views 0 times favorited 26 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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SharkeysEnd

55 posts in 93 days


09-10-2018 09:32 PM

Topic tags/keywords: band saw wobble

Hi all. I got a band saw from CL a while ago, and after changing the blade and tuning it up (per Alex Snodgrass’ tutorial), the blade moves side-to-side during operation. I tried increasing the tension, but that didn’t do it.

I capture some slo-mo video of it.

View on YouTube

I cleaned off the rubber as best I could. It’s as though the wheel is dented at one point. Is this a common occurrence? Do you think I need new wheels?

It’s a King Machinery 14” band saw. I’ll post a photo in a moment.

Thanks.

-- "Many folk like to know beforehand what is to be set on the table; but those who have laboured to prepare the feast like to keep their secret; for wonder makes the words of praise louder." -Gandalf


26 replies so far

View SharkeysEnd's profile

SharkeysEnd

55 posts in 93 days


#1 posted 09-10-2018 09:34 PM

Here’s the model information

-- "Many folk like to know beforehand what is to be set on the table; but those who have laboured to prepare the feast like to keep their secret; for wonder makes the words of praise louder." -Gandalf

View Steve's profile

Steve

668 posts in 758 days


#2 posted 09-10-2018 09:42 PM

if you put the old blade back on, does it do the same thing?

View Oldtool's profile

Oldtool

2732 posts in 2366 days


#3 posted 09-10-2018 10:01 PM

I’m no expert, but it appears to me that the blade is loose ( insufficient tension ) and the guides are completely out all the way.
As Steve mentioned, with a different blade does it still occur? Both easy and fast, check the blade first.
Maybe the tension spring is weak, are you sure the blade is under tension?, many magazine articles state not to trust the machine tension indicator, and to use a setting higher up on the scale. Some go so far as to suggest tensioning until the blade produces a note when plucked.
Check you wheels for balance.

That’s about all I got, good luck.

-- "I am a firm believer in the people. If given the truth, they can be depended upon to meet any national crisis. The point is to bring them the real facts." - Abraham Lincoln

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Kazooman

1215 posts in 2128 days


#4 posted 09-10-2018 10:12 PM

Ditto to the above. Put the guides where they should be. Don’t trust the tension indicator. You can easily test for a bent wheel, a wobbling wheel (loose or bad bearing), or a flat spot on the tires by holding a pencil or something like that firmly against the frame with the point near the wheel and rotate the wheel by hand. The ideal way would be with a dial indicator but you don’t need to get that fancy.

View CWWoodworking's profile

CWWoodworking

184 posts in 355 days


#5 posted 09-10-2018 10:57 PM

I don’t think it’s tension.

Check blade

Check tires

Check out Carter bandsaw guides ASAP.

I buy about 10 blades a month. Would be twice that without the Carter guides.

View Firewood's profile

Firewood

487 posts in 1810 days


#6 posted 09-11-2018 02:57 AM

All good points to check. One last thing, did you verify the blade isn’t mounted upside down?

-- Mike - Waukesha, WI

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SharkeysEnd

55 posts in 93 days


#7 posted 09-11-2018 01:46 PM

My apologies – when I posted yesterday evening, I didn’t know that I was going to get involved in something that took my attention for the rest of the night.

Thank you all for the replies. Let’s see…


if you put the old blade back on, does it do the same thing?
- Steve

That is a very good question, and one of the first things I will try when I have a few minutes this afternoon. The previous owner had a metal cutting blade on it, which I still have. I also bought two other new blades that I can try.


but it appears to me that the blade is loose ( insufficient tension ) and the guides are completely out all the way.

I have it tightened almost as far as it will go. As I mentioned, I tuned the saw based on the Alex Snodgrass method, i.e. tapping the blade with my finger only moves it about 1/8”. I don’t think this machine has a tension indicator and I wouldn’t use it if it does. And the guides are out because the blade moves so much. It was my understanding that a a properly tuned saw blade wouldn’t have that lateral movement, and that the blade shouldn’t touch the guides under normal operation (when not cutting something).

I was at a bit of a loss when ordering blades for this thing. I ordered them from Sawblade.com, but their wizard doesn’t have my model. Since it’s a 14” saw, I ordered the standard 93-1/2” blades, but perhaps they should be a little shorter. Like I said, it’s tightened almost as far as it will go.

You can easily test for a bent wheel, a wobbling wheel (loose or bad bearing), or a flat spot on the tires by holding a pencil or something like that firmly against the frame with the point near the wheel and rotate the wheel by hand. The ideal way would be with a dial indicator but you don’t need to get that fancy.

I’m going to try that while I’m switching the blades. I do have a dial indicator, so that might be enlightening.

did you verify the blade isn’t mounted upside down?

It’s most certainly not installed backwards.

Thanks again for the replies. I’ll check the tires and other blade during lunch.

-- "Many folk like to know beforehand what is to be set on the table; but those who have laboured to prepare the feast like to keep their secret; for wonder makes the words of praise louder." -Gandalf

View BroncoBrian's profile

BroncoBrian

831 posts in 2134 days


#8 posted 09-11-2018 02:33 PM

I agree the guides are important, but they should not touch the blade when you are not cutting, so installed or not, that wobble is not ok.

Does the machine wobble like it is out of balance?

Looks like a blade tension issue, maybe you need to downsize?

test the old blade, then if it is ok, lay them one each other if possible and check the size.

-- I think they could take sesame seeds off the market and I wouldn't even care. I can't imagine five years from now saying, "Man, remember sesame seeds? What happened? All the buns are blank."

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DrDirt

4492 posts in 3918 days


#9 posted 09-11-2018 03:32 PM

Open the door and spin the wheel
You will know if it is the wheel or the blade

I would suspect a screwed up/damaged or mismounted tire. Or a blown out bearing

You simply cannot stomp and kink a blade enoug to move THAT much under full tension

Womething is wrong with the wheel

Is it noisy while running?

-- “The two most important days in your life are the day you are born and the day you find out why.” Mark Twain

View SharkeysEnd's profile

SharkeysEnd

55 posts in 93 days


#10 posted 09-11-2018 05:58 PM

Is this normal?

I put a dial indicator on the tires (before removing the rubber). The top wheel had about 0.007” of variance, and the bottom wheel had about 0.015”. So I took the rubber off the bottom one in case there was gunk underneath and saw those holes. I’m not sure if that is standard practice to balance it.

I see new polyurethane tiresUS!-1 on eBay for the King Machinery. The price seems reasonable.

Then I saw a listing for blades for the KM band saw, and they were 92 1/2”. So I probably erred in ordering the 93 1/2” ones, and so tension might still be the issue.

At this point I’m into the thing for $100 plus the cost of three blades. I’m not sure how much more I want to dump into it. I probably should have waited and found a more common brand. But I’d been looking for about a month and quite simply got impatient.

Thanks as always for the responses. I’m such a noob.

-- "Many folk like to know beforehand what is to be set on the table; but those who have laboured to prepare the feast like to keep their secret; for wonder makes the words of praise louder." -Gandalf

View BroncoBrian's profile

BroncoBrian

831 posts in 2134 days


#11 posted 09-11-2018 07:07 PM

I don’t know if that is normal or not. I have not seen it, but who knows. If you think you might be off an inch, that is A LOT.

Can you verify by comparing the old and new blade?

You should be able to have the blade shortened.

-- I think they could take sesame seeds off the market and I wouldn't even care. I can't imagine five years from now saying, "Man, remember sesame seeds? What happened? All the buns are blank."

View AHuxley's profile

AHuxley

821 posts in 3497 days


#12 posted 09-11-2018 10:35 PM



Is this normal?

- SharkeysEnd

Drilling wheels is normal practice to balance them. It depends on the casting where manufacturers drill them but they usually drill them in a non-visible area. You also want to drill as far from the center as possible because that requires less material to be removed.

When I slowed down your video, even more, it appears that it may be a tension issue since it looks like high amplitude flutter that is not following a wheel or blade revolution cycle. If the longer blade is forcing you to bottom out your tension adjustment that may be the root of the issue.

BTW forget the comments about guides, that is clearly NOT the cause of this problem and you did the absolute correct thing by showing the blade movement with the guides backed off. While setting the guides properly would alleviate some of the symptom it would do nothing to identify or cure the actual problem.

View Bob Kassmeyer's profile

Bob Kassmeyer

228 posts in 3101 days


#13 posted 09-12-2018 12:06 AM

Hi, I have a Grizzly G0555, it comes stock with a 92.5-inch blade but you can convert it to a 93.5-inch blade doing something with the tensioning adjustment. I don’t remember what it was, it’s been a long time, but it was not too difficult. I think maybe you could look in one of the manuals online at Grizzly.

-- Bob Kassmeyer, Nebraska

View BroncoBrian's profile

BroncoBrian

831 posts in 2134 days


#14 posted 09-12-2018 12:44 AM


BTW forget the comments about guides, that is clearly NOT the cause of this problem and you did the absolute correct thing by showing the blade movement with the guides backed off.
- AHuxley

Well said.

If your blade was not wobbling because the guides were in place, that would be masking a more serious issue.

-- I think they could take sesame seeds off the market and I wouldn't even care. I can't imagine five years from now saying, "Man, remember sesame seeds? What happened? All the buns are blank."

View Lazyman's profile

Lazyman

2561 posts in 1563 days


#15 posted 09-12-2018 12:52 AM


Then I saw a listing for blades for the KM band saw, and they were 92 1/2”. So I probably erred in ordering the 93 1/2” ones, and so tension might still be the issue.

At this point I m into the thing for $100 plus the cost of three blades. I m not sure how much more I want to dump into it. I probably should have waited and found a more common brand. But I d been looking for about a month and quite simply got impatient.

Thanks as always for the responses. I m such a noob.

- SharkeysEnd

Before I saw this post, my first thought was that the blade was too long so was going to suggest you compare the length to the old blade.

You could find a local shop to cut and braze your blades to the correct size or you could try to do it yourself. There are several YouTube videos on doing it yourself if you are so inclined. I’ve never tried it myself but this one makes it look pretty easy.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

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