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Pine trim/doors are rough. Help please.

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Forum topic by Rookie0794 posted 08-02-2011 05:59 PM 1126 views 0 times favorited 5 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Rookie0794

3 posts in 1955 days


08-02-2011 05:59 PM

Topic tags/keywords: pine sanding rough

I have contractors working at my house putting in bedrooms in my lower level. The contractor trusted a new helper to stain all the pine trim and doors and it was a mess! The color did not match the existing woodwork and worse yet, when you ran your hand over the wood, it felt very rough (like you would get splinters). I asked that it be re-done. One of the other workers said it’s likely the wood was never sanded before being stained…

The contractor had the professional painter re-do it all. He got the color right but it still feels rough. Not smooth like the other woodwork in my house. He said he sanded by hand and really took his time. I have a lot of pine in my house and I’m wondering why the new wood would be so rough. Did the 1st guy totally screw it up? Should they have started over instead of trying to use the wood that was done incorrectly the 1st time? Is it a poor quality in wood? is there any way to fix it at this point?

Thanks for any advice you can give.


5 replies so far

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Dan

3630 posts in 2346 days


#1 posted 08-02-2011 06:17 PM

When the stain/finish is applied to the wood the stain will life up all the small wood fibers that were broke loose from sanding. I don’t think they did anything wrong other then it should be sanded after the stain drys. Using a very fine grit paper the trim should be lightly sanded and that will smooth the trim without damaging the finish. You can also use steel wool or abrasive pad that is fine

-- Dan - "Collector of Hand Planes"

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Dan

3630 posts in 2346 days


#2 posted 08-02-2011 06:20 PM

Also if they just used stain you will want to put a protective finish over it like poly. The stain just colors the wood, it should be coated with something to protect it like poly.

-- Dan - "Collector of Hand Planes"

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Rookie0794

3 posts in 1955 days


#3 posted 08-02-2011 06:21 PM

Thank you Dan. I, too, live near Grand Rapids! Small world.

They have already sanded, re-stained, sanded, applied the polyurethane and put the trim back up. It’s still not really smooth. Is it possible that the roughness is ‘as good as it gets’? Should they keep sanding until it’s smooth like a baby’s bottom? Sometimes I wonder if my expectations are too high but 1) I don’t think wood should be rough at all and 2) the rest of my trim/doors are smooth…

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Dan

3630 posts in 2346 days


#4 posted 08-02-2011 07:07 PM

If it were me I would sand the trip with a very fine abrasive pad, steel wool or sand paper. You will want to use the finest grit you can get. Giving everything a light sanding should smooth it out unless they did a very poor job with their sanding prior to when they added the finish. I would tend to think a fine sanding/polishing should smooth it out. Hard to say without seeing and feeling it.

-- Dan - "Collector of Hand Planes"

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shakeyhands

8 posts in 1953 days


#5 posted 08-08-2011 01:07 PM

A few years ago I bought a new home. The cabinets looked beautiful but when I would run my hand over them they felt gritty. I took the doors all down and took them out in the yard and rubbed them good with 0000 steel wool and then 2 coats of polyurethane. This made a world of difference———They suit me now!

-- So live that those who know you but do not know God will come to know God because they know you.

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