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Long Miter Joint Spline......What wood to use?

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Forum topic by Angela posted 1094 days ago 2532 views 0 times favorited 7 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Angela

205 posts in 1500 days


1094 days ago

Topic tags/keywords: question spline miter joint table saw joining

I’m making at TV stand and I’ve miter the corners. The corners are not set to 45 degrees, instead they vary. I’m going to add splines to the joints. I read the splines are suppose to be snug-fitting but isn’t there a problem with expanding and contracting?

Will any wood do?

Thanks
Angela

-- www.WoodWorkersWebsite.com - Helping other woodworker's


7 replies so far

View Blair Helgason's profile

Blair Helgason

169 posts in 2018 days


#1 posted 1094 days ago

I’m in the exact same situation. I too have heard that if the pieces are small, like splines tend to be, wood movement isn’t as much of an issue. I’ll probably go with maple or oak. Thanks for putting the question out there.

Also, I’m not sure if you know about Matt’s Basement Workshop but he did a nice process video of a Walnut Buffet where he mitred all of the corners. I think he used biscuits, not sure though, here’s the link:

http://mattsbasementworkshop.com/451-walnut-buffet-pt-1/

-- Blair

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KayBee

999 posts in 1851 days


#2 posted 1094 days ago

I’ve used hardboard for long splines in the past. No problems that I know of. They were shipped all over the country too.

-- Karen - a little bit of stupid goes a long way

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Angela

205 posts in 1500 days


#3 posted 1094 days ago

Thanks for your help and thoughts everyone. Also thanks for the link. I looked at the site and I’m going to spend more time looking on his web site; it seems like he has some good info on it.

I was wondering about hardboard, the splines will be about 19” long, but I’d never heard of anyone using hardboard so I’m glad you mentioned it.

Angela

-- www.WoodWorkersWebsite.com - Helping other woodworker's

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KayBee

999 posts in 1851 days


#4 posted 1094 days ago

I think the longest were about 8’. They went in a bunch of high end clothing stores shelving units. Ended up shipped all over the country, with different humidity, sat in unheated warehouses and generally mistreated. The installers said they were good.

-- Karen - a little bit of stupid goes a long way

View Blair Helgason's profile

Blair Helgason

169 posts in 2018 days


#5 posted 1093 days ago

Good call on the hardboard, I’ve used it before for placeholder splines until I made the real ones, almost forgot to replace them.

Hardboard seems a lot easier than milling a bunch of strips, especially if you don’t have much scrap hardwood around like me.

-- Blair

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Angela

205 posts in 1500 days


#6 posted 1091 days ago

If you read my blog you’ll see I had a problem with the plywood so I have some extra pieces already cut. I’ll glue them up with hardboard and see how it works and about the glue expansion.

-- www.WoodWorkersWebsite.com - Helping other woodworker's

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Angela

205 posts in 1500 days


#7 posted 1090 days ago

I just wanted to update anyone regarding the use of hardboard for splines. I’ve been researching the net and have found numerous articles and woodworking plans that recommend using hardboard for longer miter joints.

Here’s a couple of quotes to sum up what I found.

Splined Edge-to-Edge Joint
This is a variation of a biscuit joint. Instead of using numerous smaller biscuits, splines are essentially a single long biscuit used to align the two pieces. The spline is a piece of plywood or hardboard that is placed in a slots that are cut in the adjoining edges. These slots can be stopped so they do not show if the ends are to be exposed. One thing to keep in mind is to ensure the spline is slightly narrower than the depth of the slot. Making the spline exactly the depth of the slot can lead to splitting of the wood as the surrounding wood shrinks, but the hardboard spline does not . A gap of 1/32 (1/64th on either slot) is sufficient to prevent this problem.

Shop Notes
For Long Miters. A “capped” plywood (upper) or a hardboard (lower) spline work well forlong miter joints.

I also found a great article regarding splines in general from Shop Notes

Thanks everyone
Angela

-- www.WoodWorkersWebsite.com - Helping other woodworker's

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