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Forum topic by hjt posted 991 days ago 813 views 0 times favorited 18 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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hjt

765 posts in 1638 days


991 days ago

Is just me or am I not alone? Am I the only analytical fuzz ball that thinks about a project, dreams about this phase or that phase. Am I the only one that makes a list of what to to, how to do it, what I need, and then AGONIZE over the order the list should be written in (the ankle bone connected to the leg bone). Only to be three days into the project (having forgotten to refer to your list) on step 14 and realize that you did not do step 3 or 8. UGH!!

-- Harold


18 replies so far

View Gary's profile

Gary

6059 posts in 1933 days


#1 posted 991 days ago

Yeah, hjt, it’s just you. Everyone else here NEVER makes a mistake. NEVER…. NEVER…. oh well, maybe a few.(dozen)

-- Gary, DeKalb Texas only 4 miles from the mill

View Don W's profile

Don W

13926 posts in 1067 days


#2 posted 991 days ago

i thought i made a mistake once, turned out i was wrong.

-- There is nothing like the sound of a well tuned hand plane. - http://timetestedtools.wordpress.com (timetestedtools at hotmail dot c0m)

View lew's profile

lew

9827 posts in 2255 days


#3 posted 991 days ago

I need a list just to keep track of my lists and then still forget something!

-- Lew- Time traveler. Purveyor of the Universe's finest custom rolling pins.

View Mark Shymanski's profile

Mark Shymanski

4746 posts in 2212 days


#4 posted 991 days ago

On the few projects I have done this on I really like the organization of it; when I draw a project in SU it is very much like doing a dry run of building the project. You have to think about joints, components, what goes together when, what setups you should run all at once…stuff like that. Once I’ve drawn it in SU it feels like I’ve build it once already, and have probably identified several ‘design modifications’ that would have cost me time and wood if’d I had just started building.

-- "Checking for square? What madness is this! The cabinet is square because I will it to be so!" Jeremy Greiner LJ Topic#20953 2011 Feb 2

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hjt

765 posts in 1638 days


#5 posted 990 days ago

Ok, so not just me. Funny stuff there Don. Mark, I’ve downloaded Sketch Up but have not figured out how to use it. Even though I’m rather puter literate – this program baffles me. I can see where it would be a huge help and need to take more time to learn it.

-- Harold

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Mark Shymanski

4746 posts in 2212 days


#6 posted 990 days ago

I found out it pays to take the time to go through their tutorials, they are pretty good. Trying to just ‘figure it out’ (my preferred style of learning new stuff) will be an exercise in frustration, as many here can attest to. If you have previous CAD experience you will find SU frustrating, just accept that it is different from a CAD and the learning will go much easier. I used to do a lot of AutoCAD work (even taught it for a while) and once I accepted that SU was NOT LIKE CAD I made much faster progress ;-)

I wish you success on learning it!

-- "Checking for square? What madness is this! The cabinet is square because I will it to be so!" Jeremy Greiner LJ Topic#20953 2011 Feb 2

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hjt

765 posts in 1638 days


#7 posted 990 days ago

Brother MArk – I feel better now about my chance of get this SU thingy. I actually do not know CAD – never used it) but honestly had the sence that not knowing CAD WAS my down fall in not understanding Sketch Up.

I’ve seen what people do with it and am blown away. I know once I get itI will use it A LOT!

-- Harold

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MrRon

2393 posts in 1743 days


#8 posted 990 days ago

Harold, I use AutocadĀ© to plan all my projects. I find that I can see potential problems before they become reality. I have been using the CAD program at work and it has become 2nd nature with me. Laying out the geometry is one of the big features of a CAD program. It also makes for a refreshing break from shop work. My woodworking mostly involves building large scale locomotives that have many small intricate parts. Designing them with a CAD program, makes it easy, especially on a hot and humid day when I can sit in an air conditioned room at my keyboard. No! you are not an analytical fuzzball; just a person with an analytical mind and that is a good thing.

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AUBrian

85 posts in 1171 days


#9 posted 990 days ago

Personally, I’m great at figuring out all the different parts and dimensions, cutting them out and making sure all the holes align. However at that point I get excited, and so I’m the worst at not thinking about what order things go together, thus realizing that the extra piece laying on the workbench is the support that I should have added at the same time I glued on the top. D’oh!

View Tim Kindrick's profile

Tim Kindrick

369 posts in 1054 days


#10 posted 990 days ago

Harold, I used to be the same way. It was like I devoloped woodworking OCD. It really started to take a lot of the fun out of woodworking for me!!! Not I just design and built projects “on the fly” by making small sketched here and there and using the “trial and error method”. It has helped me relax and enjoy my craft much more!!!!

-- I have metal in my neck but wood in my blood!!

View hjt's profile

hjt

765 posts in 1638 days


#11 posted 990 days ago

OK – just upgraded from Sketch Up 7.1 to SU 8. NOw I’m off to the tutorials

-- Harold

View smboudreaux's profile

smboudreaux

48 posts in 1067 days


#12 posted 989 days ago

i’m another AutoCAD guy. everything gets built in CAD before i cut the first piece. If the project has multiple components i hit the shop with basically a set of exploded construction drawings.

View Tennessee's profile

Tennessee

1447 posts in 1014 days


#13 posted 988 days ago

I’m an old time pencil and paper guy. I also have a nice set of french curves, and a fair amount of erasers. List out all the raw lumber blanks, have a sketch of what I’m building, or a picture where I can pencil in measurements, and start. I’ve always been able to visualize what I want in my mind, so it just becomes a matter of measurement. That’s not to say my first paneled cabinet door came out exactly right…just that I knew what I wanted, and paying attention to my own notes gets me home so far, and I’m 39 years into this “hobby”.

-- Paul, Tennessee, http://www.tsunamiguitars.com

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hjt

765 posts in 1638 days


#14 posted 988 days ago

So Tennessee says the he visualizes, draws it out and measures…. hmm those are three talents I lack. No wonder a weekend project takes 3 months.

-- Harold

View Don W's profile

Don W

13926 posts in 1067 days


#15 posted 988 days ago

I hear ya Harold. I can visualize and I can draw, just can’t draw what I visualize.

-- There is nothing like the sound of a well tuned hand plane. - http://timetestedtools.wordpress.com (timetestedtools at hotmail dot c0m)

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