LumberJocks

Stanley 5002 chisels - anyone know anything about them?

  • Advertise with us

« back to Hand Tools forum

Forum topic by WhoMe posted 07-31-2011 08:42 PM 3640 views 0 times favorited 9 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View WhoMe's profile

WhoMe

1120 posts in 1929 days


07-31-2011 08:42 PM

I am looking for a set of useable starter wood chisels that I can purchase as a decent set until I really need quality tools after I have improved m woodworking skills (and when I have more money available for hand tools) . Right now I have a inherited set that are best used for pry bars or doorstop wedges.
I came across this set on the Woodcraft website on sale. Stanley 5002s I was wondering if they are comparable to the Irwin Marples chisels too.

I did a search on the Stanley 5002s on LJ and looked elsewhere on the web but was unable to find any reviews. So, anyone have any background info on these.

OR, possibly a comparable set that has 6 pieces or so and less than $75.

Thanks for any input.

-- I'm not clumsy.. It's just the floor hates me, the tables and chairs are bullies and the wall gets in the way.. - Mike -


9 replies so far

View Tedstor's profile

Tedstor

1369 posts in 1319 days


#1 posted 07-31-2011 09:01 PM

The linked Narex 6 pc set is only $49.99 and is a crowd favorite “cheap” chisel.
http://www.highlandwoodworking.com/narexboxed6-piecebenchchiselset.aspx

Edit to add: Did you notice the Woodriver set on clearance for $75?? Might be worth considering, although I don’t know much about them.
http://www.woodcraft.com/Product/2005823/17801/WoodRiver-8-Piece-Bench-Chisel-Set.aspx

Craftsman also sells a 6pc set that many have regarded as “pretty good”. Around $30.

The Stanley set you’re looking at are probably adequete in terms of quality. But nothing more than adequete. Be prepared to sharpen them more often than a higher quality tool, and be prepared for some minor manufacturing defects. But I’m sure you can work wood with them.
One major positive is that the Stanley set comes with a 1/8th chisel. Many don’t, but all should. I never realized how much I needed a 1/8 until I had one. It was a recent discovery for me.

View nordichomey's profile

nordichomey

100 posts in 1788 days


#2 posted 08-02-2011 02:32 AM

I really like my narex bench chisels once I got the backs flat. Flattening the backs was a bit miserable… once i switched to 80 grain self adhesive sandpaper flattening the backs went better.

-- nordichomey

View WhoMe's profile

WhoMe

1120 posts in 1929 days


#3 posted 08-02-2011 07:09 AM

Thanks guys. I will take a look at those narex ones. At this point, anything is better than what I have but I would prefer to pick them up locally.
Tedstor, I know that based on what I am looking at quality wise, I know I will need to sharpen them more but
I need to refine my sharpening skills anyway.
Thank you both for the advice.

-- I'm not clumsy.. It's just the floor hates me, the tables and chairs are bullies and the wall gets in the way.. - Mike -

View Moron's profile

Moron

4666 posts in 2579 days


#4 posted 08-02-2011 07:22 AM

good deal

u wont be sorry u bot them

-- "Good artists borrow, great artists steal”…..Picasso

View Arch_E's profile

Arch_E

47 posts in 1208 days


#5 posted 08-02-2011 02:58 PM

These starter sets are just that—starter sets. The price is right, also for Lee Valley’s Narex intro offer. Those chisels renown for better quality really are the better—long run—route. I’ve got a beater set of Stanley FatMax chisels. They take and hold a sharp edge really well. But their big, bulky, and uncomfortable for most finer hand work. For pounding, their great—they definitely take a beating. I’ve finally bought a better quality set (gulp, that was expensive) but do they ever handle superbly. BTW, that’s not an overstatement. Once I bought quality, I knew what “quality” was supposed to be.

My 1/4 through 5/8 see more work than 3/4 up. My 3/4 is used more than a 1” and I reach for a 1 1/2 or 2” chisel for odd chops more than for 1—1 1/4. I have a 1/8 but it doesn’t get used nearly as much as I thought.

Just my observations.

Archie

View Bertha's profile

Bertha

12951 posts in 1379 days


#6 posted 08-02-2011 03:08 PM

As far as ease of local pickup goes, hit up Lowes/HD for some blue-handled Irwin or Marples. I’ve seen two-cherries at my local ACE. I’ve got some really expensive chisels but I reserve them for important projects that I want to hand-tool only. It’s more nostalgia than function. I love and collect nice chisels but the cheap ones see the most use in my shop. Like any cheap tool, be prepared to sharpen them. On a budget, the scary sharp system and a cheap eclipse jig is your best bet. You can get all the supplies at the big box stores with maybe a quick trip to autozone or the equivalent. If you need instruction, PM me. When I drop an expensive chisel onto the concrete floor, my gut wrenches. When I drop a big box chisel onto the floor, I think, “dammit, now I gotta sharpen that stupid thing”.

-- My dad and I built a 65 chev pick up.I killed trannys in that thing for some reason-Hog

View endlink's profile

endlink

2 posts in 1174 days


#7 posted 08-04-2011 04:51 AM

WhoMe – I was exactly in the same boat last week. Only difference is that I pulled the trigger on the Stanley 5002s, 8 piece set from woodcraft for $49. Hard to argue with. The only review I found was the following: http://www.finewoodworking.com/ToolGuide/ToolGuideProduct.aspx?id=5550 . Not very helpful, basically says they’re equivalent to Irwin Marples. Good enough for me at that price. Haven’t had opportunity to put to real use yet. Woodcraft doesn’t offer the professional sharpening option on them. I, like you, saw an opportunity there. There’s definitely some machine marks on the metal work. However, nothing near the edges that I’ve seens. Took me only a few strokes on 400 grit on the backs to get even wear marks (flat). Glad to be told I’m an idiot, I’m just a beginner too.

-- "people these days know the price of everything and the value of nothing", my goal is the opposite

View Moron's profile

Moron

4666 posts in 2579 days


#8 posted 08-04-2011 05:26 AM

owning the steel is easy

the difference that I have found, is that few who have spent so much on good steel, have the ability to maintain their edge, to the point of shaving your face with them

talk is cheap

I own the best, mind you, I could shave your two faces with mine, only one with yours.

How many times do you shave a day ? …………

-- "Good artists borrow, great artists steal”…..Picasso

View Moron's profile

Moron

4666 posts in 2579 days


#9 posted 08-04-2011 05:27 AM

buy them.

its the “edge” that makes them work. Good practice makes for perfection.

-- "Good artists borrow, great artists steal”…..Picasso

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

GardenTenders.com :: gardening showcase