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Pig Rotissiere .. Gearhead question

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Forum topic by chrisstef posted 07-31-2011 06:03 PM 1507 views 0 times favorited 10 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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chrisstef

15678 posts in 2474 days


07-31-2011 06:03 PM

So here’s the backyard firepit, and of course, a firepit this bitchin needs a pig over it. Now im not much of a gearhead or welder for that matter, but with enough help from a few friends im sure i can figure this out. I need a rotissiere, so heres my questions to you LJ’s:

What kind of motor should turn a rotisseire? HP?
What kind of gear set up would i need to keep it turning slow enough?
Should i use an old oil tank cleaned and cut up to keep some smoke and heat in?

Ideas and of course renderings are more than welcomed.

LJ Pigroast?

-- rock, chalk, jayhawk


10 replies so far

View BentheViking's profile

BentheViking

1763 posts in 2032 days


#1 posted 07-31-2011 06:24 PM

Not much of a metal guy and really don’t know much about motors so I’m not much help there. I do enjoy smoking meats, but am not well versed enough in those practices to transfer those to a pig rotisserie. I do however know quite a lot about eating roasted pigs and would be more than happy to help out with that considering I am moving back up your way.

-- It's made of wood. Real sturdy.--Chubbs Peterson

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chrisstef

15678 posts in 2474 days


#2 posted 07-31-2011 06:33 PM

Well it aint gonna eat itself … lol

-- rock, chalk, jayhawk

View ChefHDAN's profile

ChefHDAN

809 posts in 2317 days


#3 posted 07-31-2011 06:42 PM

Chris, What size pigs are you expecting to cook? A 70# pig over fire you’ve pictured could take between 6 to 8 hours to cook. You can cut about 30% of that time with a closed vessel. My rotiss motor for my Ducane/Webber grill turns @ roughly 2 rpms. Here’s another idea for thought, http://generalhorticulture.tamu.edu/prof/recipes/cochon/cochon.html
But, it’s alot of hardware to keep in your backyard, I’ve also seen a pig done in a similar way where the pig is re-barred with concrete wire and tilted over a “campfire” with another piece of re-bar in an A’frame set up, or here’s a neat shot of a chainlink set up,http://charlestondailyphoto.blogspot.com/2009/11/pig-pickin-pig-pickin.html that again shows a butterflied pig which will cook much faster than a whole hog. Key things to remember, slow coals, cooking around 200f, cook the pig untill minimum of 145f internal temp or untill the meat is falling of the bone.

-- I've decided 1 mistake is really 2 opportunities to learn.. learn how to fix it... and learn how to not repeat it

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Moron

5032 posts in 3361 days


#4 posted 07-31-2011 06:50 PM

I once took an old oil tank,…….burned the oil out, cut a hole in either end, found an old motor at a junk yard that turned real slow…….a skewer, pulley……….and roast pig. Seen them cooked in a pit (dreadfully almost none pallatable)

your rocks look like limestone …….if so, they might not be the best choice for high temps ?

Seen pigs over a firepit by sandwiching the pig between two grates, guys just manually turned the grates over

-- "Good artists borrow, great artists steal”…..Picasso

View Bluepine38's profile

Bluepine38

3341 posts in 2553 days


#5 posted 07-31-2011 07:10 PM

I can vaguely remember using a cut in half lengthwise 55 gallon barrel and a chain reduction gear set up
on a 1’ shaft and 2 adjustable U shaped forks, one on each end, to hold a half a pig. What we thought
was an big oversupply of charcoal and a keg of good beer. They wisely decided to start the night before
and much sleep was lost. The co hosts were a master electrician and a master carpenter, so most problems
were easily solved. The pig tasted great. The last roast pig I ate was provided by a young gentleman who
had a pig roaster in his butcher shop that could handle two good sized pigs, as I get older I no longer have
an urge to set up and drink too much beer to roast a pig. The pigs were scraped, not skinned and he
also threw in the carving service. The beer and pig tasted just a good as the first one, although the
hunting and horse stories did change. Have fun researching and building your pig roaster 40 years ago we
did not have the internet, but we had fun experimenting. I am sure that this fire pit and roasting site
will create many happy memories and stories for your family and friends, and yes the wind always blows
the smoke the wrong way, Murphy’s law you know.

-- As ever, Gus-the 77 yr young apprentice carpenter

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TopamaxSurvivor

17677 posts in 3144 days


#6 posted 07-31-2011 08:54 PM

Why not use one off a Bar B Que?

-- Bob in WW ~ "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

View racerglen's profile

racerglen

3112 posts in 2248 days


#7 posted 07-31-2011 08:55 PM

Gus the worst or best pig roast I’ve heard of was a bunch at a drag strip in Terrace B.C. the guys knew it’d take a while, like start piggie at 4 am for a evening meal.. So some of the boys (kids) decided to light her up at that time.. 2 to 3 gallons of av gas on the briquettes and throw a match to her.. The resultant BOOF ! lit the entire track and required the nearest neighbour to move his closed car trailer as the heat was baking the paint.. once the gas died down, the blackened pig started to crack..then the fat began to drip..more flame,..
Zo..ve have un pig that’s been seared with leaded gas in a whole lot of short time..hard as steel on the outside..and raw inside, and totaly ruined for any type of consumption..I’d not want to eat anything that’s been fried over gasoline of any sort.. So this weekend we’re trying a more reasoned aproach at a much more southern location.. WITH ADULTS TO WATCH OVER PIGGIE !!!

-- Glen, B.C. Canada

View chrisstef's profile

chrisstef

15678 posts in 2474 days


#8 posted 07-31-2011 11:54 PM

Chef, thanks for the links theres some real good info on there. Its something that ive been talking about doing for a while but you know how that goes, talk is cheap, so id say a smaller hog would be the best idea, 70#’s sounds appropriate. I was envisioning an A Frame set up with a chain drive to rotate the hog. But im figuring that i would have to seriously reduce the speed of a motor .. 2 rpms is pretty slow for something someone might have layin around. Im not much of an engine and gear kinda guy but i do have a brother inlaw that makes a camaro run under 8 second quarter miles so ill probably consult him on the gearing.

Moron, Im not sure what type of stone it is but limestone isnt really that local around here, the town i live in is actually very famous for its brownstone quarries and isinglass, which from what i hear used to be used for lanterns. Id guess its shale but you make a really good point, the heat that it reflects is pretty serious.

Topa – sounds like a good idea, sometimes the right answer is the obvious one lol. Would it be able to turn the wieght of a hog and the pipe?

Blue, ive seen an old oil tank set up and the pig came out great ill have to look into the 55 gal drum. Ohh and if i ever meet that Murphy guy im gonna give him a piece of my mind he’s been messing with me for too long.

Glen, ive had gasoline chicken before .. it sucks. Luckily ive grown out of the stage of “im impatient lets get some gasoline”, but ive been there.

-- rock, chalk, jayhawk

View ChefHDAN's profile

ChefHDAN

809 posts in 2317 days


#9 posted 08-18-2011 10:45 PM

Chris, I’ll happily trade you my rotiss motor for your brother’s camaro!

-- I've decided 1 mistake is really 2 opportunities to learn.. learn how to fix it... and learn how to not repeat it

View racerglen's profile

racerglen

3112 posts in 2248 days


#10 posted 08-20-2011 01:07 PM

Oh..our pig roast worked very well..no Av Gas for this one, briquettes, well aged cherry from orchard pruinings an electric rotiscerie with the big moma bbq made from an old fuel oil tank and a “secret”” multi stage basting process. The cook kept changing the recipie every time she got a refill on her libations.
The carving crew apeared quite pleased with my offering, a carbon steel 14” bladed butcher knife (19” overall) from Sheffield, probably turn of the last century or so. I think the count was over 100 served, pot luck alongside piggie
Great times..

-- Glen, B.C. Canada

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