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Forum topic by Justin posted 1124 days ago 1794 views 0 times favorited 25 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Justin

118 posts in 1602 days


1124 days ago

Topic tags/keywords: question tablesaw

I am pretty sure I am going to order the 10 Inch Left Tilt 2 HP Table Saw from general but i got a question about the wiring for the motor. It says the motor is pre-wired 230 (2 HP, 115/230 V, 19.5/9.5 A). I currently only have 120 running in my shop so I will need to change the saw over from 230 to 115, from what I gather all you need to do is change a few connections inside the saw and change the plug. Is that all you have to do or am i misinformed? and is this something I can do my self with some knowledge of electrical.


25 replies so far

View Toolz's profile

Toolz

1003 posts in 2375 days


#1 posted 1124 days ago

Justin, I’m not sure about “General” but most saws have wiring diagrams in the manual that show you exactly what you have to do to change from 230 to 115.

-- Larry "Work like a Captain but Play like a Pirate!"

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Howie

2656 posts in 1555 days


#2 posted 1124 days ago

Like Toolz said, look at the manual or inside the connection cap on the motor. It’s not hard, just a couple of connections. Change the plug and you are in business. Save the plug in case you ever want to go back to 220.

-- Life is good.

View TopamaxSurvivor's profile

TopamaxSurvivor

14725 posts in 2308 days


#3 posted 1124 days ago

Your garage circuit may not start that saw. The general purpose circuit is usually 15 amp and that one draws 19.5. It may take up to a 40 or 50 amp breaker to start it.

-- "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

View gfadvm's profile

gfadvm

10737 posts in 1323 days


#4 posted 1123 days ago

I dont know about General but Grizzly will prewire their saws for 110 or 220. Just tell them which you want when you order. Talk to the service guys, not the order desk.

-- " I'll try to be nicer, if you'll try to be smarter" gfadvm

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Grandpa

3098 posts in 1308 days


#5 posted 1123 days ago

Elizabeth has a blog on this that was posted today. She changed her bandsaw. She has photos and costs.

View Manitario's profile

Manitario

2301 posts in 1515 days


#6 posted 1123 days ago

I had a General saw and the re-wiring schematic was on the inside of the motor cover. As Topa said though, you won’t be able to run a 2HP saw off your current garage wiring even if you convert the saw to 110V.

-- Sometimes the creative process requires foul language. -- Charles Neil

View pmcwood's profile

pmcwood

11 posts in 1126 days


#7 posted 1123 days ago

Those 110V / 220V dual voltage motors fail a-lot when they are converted to 110V. Usually it’s due to undersized wiring, be careful.

As many failures that I’ve seen, I usually don’t recommend changing to 110V. Especially for motors over 1-1/2 HP.

-- PMC Router Bits, http://www.pmcrouterbits.com - Hammond, Louisiana

View TopamaxSurvivor's profile

TopamaxSurvivor

14725 posts in 2308 days


#8 posted 1123 days ago

I agree with that totally. If you notice any hesitation when you turn on a motor, there are low voltage (small wire) issues that damage and shorten the motor life.

-- "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

View Justin's profile

Justin

118 posts in 1602 days


#9 posted 1123 days ago

All of the above makes, which kind of makes me rethink my options. Would it hurt the saw to rewire it and use it for a month or two while we upgrage the electrical and change back to 230? It wouldn’t get a huge amount of use in those few months.

View TopamaxSurvivor's profile

TopamaxSurvivor

14725 posts in 2308 days


#10 posted 1122 days ago

Probably not if yoiu have 120 volt circuit that will get it started.. It should have a thermal overload that should trip if it overheats to much. They are usually set too high so there isn’t a lot of nuisance tripping.

-- "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

View Manitario's profile

Manitario

2301 posts in 1515 days


#11 posted 1122 days ago

If your garage is just wired for 120V, it is probably only on 15amp breakers; your saw will draw 19.5amps when wired to 120V (more amps at startup) which will trip your breaker every time.

-- Sometimes the creative process requires foul language. -- Charles Neil

View Popsnsons's profile

Popsnsons

327 posts in 1614 days


#12 posted 1122 days ago

You also want to consider the size wire going from the breaker to the outlet. 14awg may not carry the load, depending on the distance of the run. Haven’t done the math but trying to prevent a potential fire hazard.

-- Pops ~ In So Cal...

View TopamaxSurvivor's profile

TopamaxSurvivor

14725 posts in 2308 days


#13 posted 1122 days ago

There are some breakers out there that probably shouldn’t be. I would not say a 15 amp breaker won’t start it until you try it ;-)) Number 10 wire is the proper wire for this motor on 120 volts. It may take a 40 or 50 amp breaker to start it. Some brands, smaller may hold it just fine. If they do, you might want to consider getting a better quality panel installed.

-- "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

View Moron's profile

Moron

4666 posts in 2526 days


#14 posted 1122 days ago

hire an electrician

it will be the best 35 bucks you ever spent

-- "Good artists borrow, great artists steal”…..Picasso

View Grandpa's profile

Grandpa

3098 posts in 1308 days


#15 posted 1122 days ago

Just hire and electrician and he will take care of the voltage, saw and panel. There are too many unknowns here.
Topo the way you wrote the above answer it sounds like you are advocating using 10 ga. wire and 40 amp circuit breakers. I don’t think you meant that but if Justin tries that he could get into trouble. I think you were just thinking on paper so to speak. It might take a 40 or 50 amp breaker to start the motor but you would need wiring for 50 amp breakers. Now we are into 6 ga.

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