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installing aftermarket table saw fence question

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Forum topic by Camper posted 07-29-2011 09:54 PM 1657 views 0 times favorited 6 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Camper

232 posts in 2321 days


07-29-2011 09:54 PM

Hi everyone,

I am trying to install a T2 fence on a TS3650 table saw and decided to drill the table saw top rather than the fence rail. However, two of the holes (one for front and one for back rail) line up with the support ridges under the table. So I need to remove about 1/2 high 3/4 inch long piece of the support ridge on the front and back of the saw against the inside of the front and back edge, probably with a grinder. Does anyone see a problem (long or short term) with this modification?

Thanks in advance

-- Tampa-FL


6 replies so far

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knotscott

7216 posts in 2841 days


#1 posted 07-29-2011 10:00 PM

The 3650 is a left tilt saw, so you’ll need little to no room on the left side of the blade…...so, why not just slide the rails a little bit farther to the right until the fence holes are past those ridges?

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

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Camper

232 posts in 2321 days


#2 posted 07-29-2011 10:49 PM

Knotscott thanks, thought about that but then the scale is all out of alignment and I would need to install another scale which I thought would be more of a headache installing dead on straight than grinding cast iron….there seems to be many options here and I am just not sure which way to go…so any suggestions from the more experienced are welcome.

-- Tampa-FL

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Minorhero

372 posts in 2070 days


#3 posted 07-30-2011 01:34 AM

I believe the T2 is a biesemeyer clone, meaning that the fence does not actually touch the back rail. So unless you plan to install an extension table, there is actually no reason to install the back rail, thus saving you some drilling.

I doubt there will be a problem longterm with grinding the underside of your table, the only problem you might have is in the short run if you crack your casting. Personally I would drill the fence rails a long time before I bothered to drill the cast iron table top. Not only is it considerably easier to drill the rails (you can use a drill press) but you can get replacement fence rails a lot easier then you can get replacement table tops if you mess up or for some unknown reason want to have rails that don’t have the extra two holes.

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Camper

232 posts in 2321 days


#4 posted 07-31-2011 03:13 PM

Monirhero thanks. Actually the T2 is a bies clone but does ride on the back rail but I have seen mods where others have glued a piece of lexan under the fence so it rides on the table.

You do make a good point about replacement if something does go wrong…

One concern about drilling the fence is that it does not have much vertical room to shift the holes up to make sure that the fence rides close to the top of the table. If I were to move the holes sideways to match the table, there would be 3/8” gap between the top of the table and the bottom of the fence.

-- Tampa-FL

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Camper

232 posts in 2321 days


#5 posted 08-04-2011 05:16 AM

Just to close the loop on this, I did decide to drill the rails and it worked out great. The directions I found here were really helpful. Couple of things worth mentioning other than be real careful with your measurements:

1. The front rail has about 1/8” (no more) vertical space to move your holes up if the fence is riding too high off the table saw top. I took full advantage of this.
2. the back rail has no vertical room to move the holes up so what I did is I milled 1/8” off the bottom of white plastic part that rides on the back of the rail (if you have the fence you know what I am talking about) to compensate for raising the holes in the front rail. Now the fence rides less than 1/8” over the table which seems OK.
3. two important measurements at least for this saw are, the distance between the front holes is 16.5” and the rear holes are 10 1/16” in the cast iron top. When you are drilling, once you mark where one hole should be, you can work off the center of this hole to drill the other one.

Hope this helps in case some one is looking for this kind of info.

I find this to be a very solid fence and very very easily adjustable once it is mounted.

-- Tampa-FL

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Camper

232 posts in 2321 days


#6 posted 08-09-2011 04:31 AM

I finally took a picture of one of the holes in the front which moved 1/8” vertically up. I thought this was one of the critical steps as there was not that much vertical space on the rail and had to be done to ensure that the fence rides slightly higher than the table but not too much.

-- Tampa-FL

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