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tips on using a jointer

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Forum topic by Pabs posted 07-25-2011 06:29 PM 1995 views 0 times favorited 12 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Pabs

196 posts in 2916 days


07-25-2011 06:29 PM

hey all
last night I used my jointer to flatten a bunch of lumber for my next project.
I don’t use the jointer much and was curious on the best way of getting a flat board.

I lay the board down on the cupped side. meaning the front and back contact the table while the middle rises above slightly…..

what has me a little confused is where are you suppose to put pressure as you slide the board? before the blade or after?

any tips are welcome, sites, videos, whatever…

thanks

-- Pabs


12 replies so far

View TomHintz's profile

TomHintz

207 posts in 2860 days


#1 posted 07-25-2011 06:43 PM

I have a whole section on using jointers because you are far from alone in needing to get the hang of it. i think that the jointer is the most technique-dependent machine we use in woodworking. Check out the link below.

http://www.newwoodworker.com/basic/index.html

-- Tom Hintz, www.newwoodworker.com

View Dan's profile

Dan

3630 posts in 2342 days


#2 posted 07-25-2011 06:46 PM

I have always heard and been told that you put pressure on the board before the blade and continue the pressure there until your towards the end of your board then you shift pressure to the out feed table. It will vary as to the size of the boards. If a board is twisted its a little tricky.

-- Dan - "Collector of Hand Planes"

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AaronK

1440 posts in 2926 days


#3 posted 07-25-2011 06:58 PM

you basically start with pressure on the outfeed side, then switch to the infeed side as soon as you safely can. The amount of pressure is a totally different story though – that depends on a lot of things… how cupped the board is, how long the board is, etc.

For example, if the board is pretty flexible (thin) and is cupped, you might be able to apply pressure to the point where the whole board bends and lays flat on the jointer. Then moving it over the blade only results in a smooth face – when you release the pressure the board springs back. now your board is still cupped… so that’s where it gets to be a matter of experience and technique. best thing is to test it out on messed up (crooked, warped, etc) 2×4s that you can get for cheap.

View Pabs's profile

Pabs

196 posts in 2916 days


#4 posted 07-25-2011 07:12 PM

thanks guys…and thanks Tom for the link, just watched the 2 videos, wish I would have seen them before last night! i know what mistake was now
thanks

-- Pabs

View crank49's profile

crank49

3981 posts in 2433 days


#5 posted 07-25-2011 08:59 PM

Dan and AaronK, you do realize you both gave exactly opposite advice. Maybe we all need to watch those links.

By the way, Pabs, I believe you might have the definition of cupped a little off. Depends on what you mean by “front and back”. If you mean the edges (across the width) you’re fine. If you mean the ends are down and the middle is above the table, then that describes a board with a bow.

-- Michael: Hillary has a long list of accomplishments, though most DAs would refer to them as felonies.

View AaronK's profile

AaronK

1440 posts in 2926 days


#6 posted 07-25-2011 09:10 PM

crank – thanks for catching that. No – Dan has things in the right order. it is certainly dangerous to use a jointer by applying pressure to the outfeed side before the wood has even passed the blade! ;-)

anyway, what I had meant to say was that you start with pressure on the infeed, then switch to pressure on the outfeed as soon as it is safe to do so. Tom says pretty much the same thing on his site…

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AaronK

1440 posts in 2926 days


#7 posted 07-25-2011 09:11 PM

crank – thanks for catching that. No – Dan has things in the right order. it is certainly dangerous to use a jointer by applying pressure to the outfeed side before the wood has even passed the blade! ;-)

anyway, what I had meant to say was that you start with pressure on the infeed, then switch to pressure on the outfeed as soon as it is safe to do so. Tom says pretty much the same thing on his site…

View Pabs's profile

Pabs

196 posts in 2916 days


#8 posted 07-25-2011 09:15 PM

crank..I guess I meant a bow :)

you a roadie? just saw your profile pic.. I live on my bike…when not at work, doing family stuff or in the workshop :)

-- Pabs

View crank49's profile

crank49

3981 posts in 2433 days


#9 posted 07-25-2011 10:05 PM

I got a couple of bikes, Giant OCR2 and a Cypress set up for commuting. Longest ride I’ve done is 30 miles so I’m not what you would call a roadie, just like to ride. The bike in my avatar is a Bamboo bike; thought it was cool.

-- Michael: Hillary has a long list of accomplishments, though most DAs would refer to them as felonies.

View Letorix's profile

Letorix

119 posts in 1965 days


#10 posted 07-26-2011 07:27 AM

I’m finding it difficult flattening the face of the board, I continue to get a bow in the middle of 3/32 to 1/8 on boards greater than 4’. I built a 8’ reference board out of 1/2” MDF and 2” square aluminum tubes today, I’m going to see how much I can let the planer handle the faces, I do well with the edges.

I’ve taken the straight edge and marked the protruding bow with a sharpy and just worked those areas, that helped alot but still no cigar. I almost feel I need a tire bearing down on the board on the outfeed side of the table or just use a straight edge and router….these long boards are trouble it seems…they may even cause me to lose a pound or two in this heat.

View rance's profile

rance

4245 posts in 2622 days


#11 posted 07-26-2011 08:29 AM

Pabs, I don’t care where you push on the board or if it is bowed up or down. But whatever method you use, you 1) don’t want the board to change orientation from the start of the cut till the end, and 2) you don’t want to flex the board in any way whatsoever during the cut. Although I believe having the bow UP in the center as you described is best, you’ll want to perform the operation such that the two ideas above are maintained. HTH. :)

-- Backer boards, stop blocks, build oversized, and never buy a hand plane--

View AaronK's profile

AaronK

1440 posts in 2926 days


#12 posted 07-26-2011 01:01 PM

letorix – I always figured that if I can easily bend a board into flat (1/8” bow over 4’ in 3/4” stock should be that flexible) then jointing is pretty much done. It may not be as perfect as some would hope, but I don’t sweat it :-)

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