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Need help with rarge radius moulding.

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Forum topic by Tom Adamski posted 04-03-2008 04:57 AM 3750 views 0 times favorited 22 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Tom Adamski

306 posts in 2518 days


04-03-2008 04:57 AM

Topic tags/keywords: moulding help mantel question router milling

Large Radius Moulding

I’m having an issue. I’m making mantels for a local fireplace shop and one of their more popular mantels has a large radius face (approx 6” radius). I need to find a better way (read: easier and faster) to make this. Currently I’m taking a 2×6 board and faceting it on the tablesaw and then using a flexable course sanding form to smooth out the ridges and round the profile. This is taking forever on a 6 foot long board. The picture is a profile. The finished dimensions are 5 1/2” tall and approx 1 1/4” thick with a 6” radius curve and 3/4×1/2 rabbits on the the back. Any help would be appreciated.

FYI I don’t have a shaper…

Thanks,

Tom

-- Anybody can become a woodworker, but only a Craftsman can hide his mistakes.


22 replies so far

View Douglas Bordner's profile

Douglas Bordner

3971 posts in 2811 days


#1 posted 04-03-2008 05:18 AM

I’m not sure if this would be helpful, especially at the price of $400 but would the Lonnie Bird CMT Crown molding set do what you need? It’s a tablesaw/router set of cutters.
At the least this will bump your post back up top.

-- "Bordnerizing" perfectly good lumber for over a decade.

View John Ormsby's profile

John Ormsby

1281 posts in 2484 days


#2 posted 04-03-2008 06:26 AM

I think you might want to think seriously about getting a shaper or molder if you are going to do a lot of these or other molding in the future. They are the 2 machines of choice because they are easier and much safer. The molder would be first choice. A basic Williams & Hussey or a Shop Fox would do just fine. You could do it on a shaper if you have a 3” or taller molding cutter head. Since the profile is symmetrical, just have a set of knives made up at 1/2 the profile and run the board through again after flipping it over. A shaper will cost much more than a smaller molding machine and a power feeder would be recommended with this type of process. I have also done, and still do occasionally, molding the way you are doing. It all depends on the amount that needs to be done and how safe it will be.

John

-- Oldworld, Fair Oaks, Ca

View Tom Adamski's profile

Tom Adamski

306 posts in 2518 days


#3 posted 04-03-2008 06:27 AM

Doug,
Thanks for the reply, but that will cut a cove. I need a convex front, not a concave. Essentially the opposite of what that cutter will do.

Tom

-- Anybody can become a woodworker, but only a Craftsman can hide his mistakes.

View GaryK's profile

GaryK

10262 posts in 2735 days


#4 posted 04-03-2008 06:31 AM

Just make a template and then use a router with a template bit to make them all day.

Once you have a square edge you can use whatever router bit profile you want.

Use a router attached to a circle cutting jig (a long 6 foot one) with a pivot at one end and the router
at the other to make a perfect radius template.

-- Gary - Never pass up the opportunity to make a mistake look like you planned it that way - Tyler, TX

View Tom Adamski's profile

Tom Adamski

306 posts in 2518 days


#5 posted 04-03-2008 06:41 AM

John,
That seems to be the best solution, but at $2k for the machine and another $300 for the knives is a little rich for my wallet…

Gary,
I’m not sure what you mean… This is 6’ long. The picture is a cross section of the moulding.

Tom

-- Anybody can become a woodworker, but only a Craftsman can hide his mistakes.

View GaryK's profile

GaryK

10262 posts in 2735 days


#6 posted 04-03-2008 06:43 AM

Sorry, I thought it was an overhead view. Let me think about it.

You could spend some money and get a Legacy mill. You could probably make 4 at once after you
make a jig.

Once you have one you can do all kinds of things.

http://www.legacywoodworking.com/

-- Gary - Never pass up the opportunity to make a mistake look like you planned it that way - Tyler, TX

View hobbylogger's profile

hobbylogger

21 posts in 2460 days


#7 posted 04-03-2008 07:10 AM

wether your table saw has left or right tilt would determine what side that your rip fence would go. First determine the angle , then set your blade accordingly. run several pieces on edge at that angle, then reset the angle and the fence and run them again. This would give you a rough radius, then smooth it with a home made cabinet scraper that matches the profile, or use an orbital sander stating with 60 grt and then progressing to finer grts. I you are doing alot of these then do the steps in a production line style by doing several pieces at one time. I Hope this helped, or spured some ideas. Good luck.

-- Daniel, Tumwater, Wa U.S.A.

View Tom Adamski's profile

Tom Adamski

306 posts in 2518 days


#8 posted 04-03-2008 07:25 AM

Thanks guys, I think I found my answer… I found a passage in “The best tips from 25 years of Fine Woodworking” on a router trammel jig that will cut the radius. Now I just have to get the book from the library and build the jig.

-- Anybody can become a woodworker, but only a Craftsman can hide his mistakes.

View Bob #2's profile

Bob #2

3808 posts in 2769 days


#9 posted 04-03-2008 07:27 AM

If you build a “bridge” of the same radius as you need for the surface that will mount your router and a set of guides to hold the board in position you should be able to run the router over the board from one end to the other in a series of passes.
By moving your router to a new postion on the Bridge and locking it you should be able to rough the piece out in about 6 or 8 passes.
I bit of sanding should join the passes quickly.

Not ideal but cheap.

Bob

-- A mind, like a home, is furnished by its owner

View Tom Adamski's profile

Tom Adamski

306 posts in 2518 days


#10 posted 04-03-2008 07:29 AM

Thanks Bob,
I think you are saying the same as the drawing I found. I appreciate the help. I update after I get the drawings from the library and make the jig.

Tom

-- Anybody can become a woodworker, but only a Craftsman can hide his mistakes.

View Thos. Angle's profile

Thos. Angle

4438 posts in 2710 days


#11 posted 04-03-2008 01:32 PM

My hardwood supplier has a molding business with lots of molding knives. I had him make a custom knife for my mirror moldings. He didn’t even charge me for it. If you can find one of these outfits in your area it is the way to go. I just pick the boards and then pick them up when the moldings are ready. They even have a string sander. Many of the finish carpenters and contractors use this service. These are some beautiful moldings.

-- Thos. Angle, Jordan Valley, Oregon

View Peter Oxley's profile

Peter Oxley

1426 posts in 2622 days


#12 posted 04-03-2008 03:28 PM

You might be able to find someone with a small molding machine near you by contacting a manufacturer of molding machines. I think Woodmaster keeps a database of their customers and makes referrals.

-- http://www.peteroxley.com -- http://north40studios.etsy.com --

View Tom Adamski's profile

Tom Adamski

306 posts in 2518 days


#13 posted 04-03-2008 04:35 PM

Thos. & Peter… Thanks for the ideas.

-- Anybody can become a woodworker, but only a Craftsman can hide his mistakes.

View jm82435's profile

jm82435

1281 posts in 2489 days


#14 posted 04-03-2008 11:14 PM

If you had to run very much of this, a molder would obviously be the ticket. I bought an old Belsaw planer/ molder that was cheap and would make short work of this (after ~$80 for the custom ground knife). It might be worth keeping an eye out for a cheap used one. Or like was suggested earlier, find someone with a molder. In my opinion by the time you built the jig you could have paid for the custom ground knife… my $.02

-- A thing of beauty is a joy forever...

View Tom Adamski's profile

Tom Adamski

306 posts in 2518 days


#15 posted 04-04-2008 06:37 AM

I had a little free time today, so I wanted to try to make a router trammel for cutting this moulding. It is a "proof of concept" and it is in progress. I still need to mount it to a base to keep the main arcs in alignment. I'll follow up once I try it out.

Tom

-- Anybody can become a woodworker, but only a Craftsman can hide his mistakes.

showing 1 through 15 of 22 replies

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