LumberJocks

Craftsman jointer restoration question

  • Advertise with us

« back to Power Tools, Hardware and Accessories forum

Forum topic by SharkeysEnd posted 08-21-2018 11:05 AM 337 views 0 times favorited 18 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View SharkeysEnd's profile

SharkeysEnd

33 posts in 36 days


08-21-2018 11:05 AM

Topic tags/keywords: jointer co-planar

Hi all. Lately I’ve been diving deeper into the world of woodwoorking, and my newest acquisition is an old Craftsman 6” jointer model 113.206931. The beds are not co-planar at the moment, but I found the manual online, and there are four convenient bolts for adjusting it. But the infeed bed itself isn’t flat. I can easily fit a 0.010” feeler under the straightedge from about 2.5” in from either side, the entire depth of the bed. Luckily the outfeed bed is fine.

I believe my options are
A) get the two beds as co-planar as I can and live with it
B) get rid of it and dump a ton of cash on an 8” jointer that I won’t grow out of as quickly
C) bring it to a machinist and try to have it ground flat
D) try to level it myself

I’m pretty sure Option D is a fool’s errand, but I thought someone here might have done it, or attempted it, and want to share their experience. But the main reason I’m posting is because I’m curious about option C. I’m not sure what kind of company to look for doing it, or how much it might cost. Do I just google “machinist?”

Thanks.

-- "Many folk like to know beforehand what is to be set on the table; but those who have laboured to prepare the feast like to keep their secret; for wonder makes the words of praise louder." -Gandalf


18 replies so far

View Aj2's profile

Aj2

1661 posts in 1917 days


#1 posted 08-21-2018 02:12 PM

Some craftsmen jointers have a fixed outfeed table. That means it is not adjustable up and down with a knob like the Infeed has. They are very frustrating to set knifes and not a good choice for woodworking projects.
My first jointer was this style I paid 50$. I used it till the gib screws wore out and threw the knifes.
Bad bad jointer.

-- Aj

View GR8HUNTER's profile

GR8HUNTER

4564 posts in 831 days


#2 posted 08-21-2018 02:18 PM

I personally would not do option C on a good jointer too expensive might as well be patient and ready to jump on a CL deal ….GOOD LUCK :<))

-- Tony---- Reinholds,Pa.------ REMEMBER TO ALWAYS HAVE FUN

View SharkeysEnd's profile

SharkeysEnd

33 posts in 36 days


#3 posted 08-21-2018 02:19 PM

Yeah, that’s what this is. I didn’t think setting the knives was all that bad – I stood a speed square on the outfeed table and adjusted the knives so they would scrape it without moving it. I kind of liked the way the set screw adjusted the height. It was a little time consuming but not difficult.

But as this is my first jointer, I don’t know any better. You have me beat – I paid $75 (and drove an hour each way to get it)

-- "Many folk like to know beforehand what is to be set on the table; but those who have laboured to prepare the feast like to keep their secret; for wonder makes the words of praise louder." -Gandalf

View SharkeysEnd's profile

SharkeysEnd

33 posts in 36 days


#4 posted 08-21-2018 02:38 PM

One of the problems I’ve been facing while trying to get a jointer is that the people in my area have an overinflated idea about what their used jointers are worth.

Here’s a good example:

The poster is asking $1100 for that thing! It’s a Grizzly G1018. I looked around, and people have been buying those used for around $400. Good grief. Another guy wants $700 (firm) for an 8” Geetech CT-200. Someone else wants $269 for the same POS Craftsman that I now have.

/rant

One thing I figured out was that I have to search for “jointer,” “joiner,” and “planer” because quite often people don’t know what they have.

-- "Many folk like to know beforehand what is to be set on the table; but those who have laboured to prepare the feast like to keep their secret; for wonder makes the words of praise louder." -Gandalf

View GR8HUNTER's profile

GR8HUNTER

4564 posts in 831 days


#5 posted 08-21-2018 03:16 PM

YES I know very high in my area also im moving to where Scott is $1100 way too much for that :<((((((

-- Tony---- Reinholds,Pa.------ REMEMBER TO ALWAYS HAVE FUN

View HokieKen's profile

HokieKen

6169 posts in 1257 days


#6 posted 08-21-2018 03:24 PM

Just adjust so the outfeed is co planar with the high spots on the infeed. The infeed is really just a support and an alignment aid until you get into the cut a bit. After that, your focus is to keep the fresh-cut face flat on the outfeed table anyway. I wouldn’t worry about the infeed being perfectly flat. And, at any rate, .010 isn’t anything to worry over. Just means if you are cutting in the center of the table, you’re taking a .010 deeper cut than you would be at the edge of the table. My advice is to simply try it out and see if you can make flat faces :-)

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

View SharkeysEnd's profile

SharkeysEnd

33 posts in 36 days


#7 posted 08-21-2018 03:29 PM



Just adjust so the outfeed is co planar with the high spots on the infeed. ... My advice is to simply try it out and see if you can make flat faces :-)

That sounds like good advice, thanks. I’d tried it a few times before I checked the planes, and it was only cutting the first half of the pieces. As soon as there was enough surface area on the outfeed table, it more or less stopped cutting. Luckily the Craftsman has four adjustment bolts so I don’t have to try to shim it.

-- "Many folk like to know beforehand what is to be set on the table; but those who have laboured to prepare the feast like to keep their secret; for wonder makes the words of praise louder." -Gandalf

View GR8HUNTER's profile

GR8HUNTER

4564 posts in 831 days


#8 posted 08-21-2018 03:33 PM



Yeah, that s what this is. I didn t think setting the knives was all that bad – I stood a speed square on the outfeed table and adjusted the knives so they would scrape it WITHOUT moving it. I kind of liked the way the set screw adjusted the height. It was a little time consuming but not difficult.

But as this is my first jointer, I don t know any better. You have me beat – I paid $75 (and drove an hour each way to get it)

- SharkeysEnd


you need it to move slightly :<))

-- Tony---- Reinholds,Pa.------ REMEMBER TO ALWAYS HAVE FUN

View SharkeysEnd's profile

SharkeysEnd

33 posts in 36 days


#9 posted 08-21-2018 03:38 PM


you need it to move slightly :<))

This is why I joined this forum. Thank you, sir.

-- "Many folk like to know beforehand what is to be set on the table; but those who have laboured to prepare the feast like to keep their secret; for wonder makes the words of praise louder." -Gandalf

View Aj2's profile

Aj2

1661 posts in 1917 days


#10 posted 08-21-2018 03:44 PM

A jointers job is to make a flat face and square edge to this face. Then you can quickly mate two boards together without any gaps.Or silly jigs or fixtures.
If you can set up the machine to do this your golden.

-- Aj

View HokieKen's profile

HokieKen

6169 posts in 1257 days


#11 posted 08-21-2018 03:52 PM

Also, just to make sure, you do have the infeed table set lower than the outfeed, right? The tables should be parallel but not in the same plane. The infeed should be sitting somewhere around 1/32” lower than the outfeed. If you’re getting sections where the board is resting on both tables but not being cut, lower the infeed a bit more.

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

View SharkeysEnd's profile

SharkeysEnd

33 posts in 36 days


#12 posted 08-21-2018 04:54 PM

Yes, even though this is my first jointer, I think I understand what it’s supposed to do and how it’s supposed to do it. I think the reason I was worried about the sag in the infeed table is because right now I’m trying to join pieces of wood that are shorter than the tables. So they’re starting on a slightly upward angle. But I’ll work on getting the two ends co-planar and then try a couple of longer boards to see if those work better.

Thank you all so much!

The ultimate goal for me in this woodworking journey is to be able to make cabinets for my kitchen. I may or may not ever achieve that, but I know I’ll enjoy the learning process. But don’t worry, I’m starting slow – the first project was a workbench frame, and the current project is another one, but this time with mortise and tenon joints. After that I want to play around with box joints by making some storage bins. Baby steps…

-- "Many folk like to know beforehand what is to be set on the table; but those who have laboured to prepare the feast like to keep their secret; for wonder makes the words of praise louder." -Gandalf

View Aj2's profile

Aj2

1661 posts in 1917 days


#13 posted 08-21-2018 05:06 PM

I like your confidence. To me it sounds like you have lots of patience. Very good!
Good luck

-- Aj

View HokieKen's profile

HokieKen

6169 posts in 1257 days


#14 posted 08-21-2018 05:36 PM

I think I may have misunderstood which way the hollow in the table runs. I was thinking it was hollow between the long sides. Sounds now though like it’s between the ends. Either way, it doesn’t really matter. If it’s .010” as long as your taking a cut deeper than that and keeping the pressure on the outfeed side, I don’t think you’d ever know the difference was there if you hadn’t looked for it.

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

View DBDesigns's profile

DBDesigns

129 posts in 116 days


#15 posted 08-21-2018 06:08 PM

If you get the jointer set as close as possible and it still doesn’t give you the straight edge you need for a joint, consider investing in a jointer plane or fore plane to adjust the resulting boards to a finer condition.

You will enjoy tuning the hand planes and it will give you a new perspective on your projects. Power tools and hand tools still exist well together in most skilled woodworker’s shops. The hand planes will also help you true the faces of boards that are too wide for a power jointer.

Just sayin’

-- I remember when Grateful wasn't Dead

showing 1 through 15 of 18 replies

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com