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should I or shouldn't I

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Forum topic by Karda posted 08-20-2018 05:56 AM 1132 views 0 times favorited 41 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Karda

1303 posts in 725 days


08-20-2018 05:56 AM

I have a large bowl blank 9.5 by 3.5 round. But it has a number of cracks. I glued them and they haven’t grown in a couple months.The cracks are not to deep but they are on both sides. Do I dare turn this piece or is it a waste. The blank is ash and doesn’t appear to have nice figure thanks Mike


41 replies so far

View Woodknack's profile

Woodknack

12398 posts in 2551 days


#1 posted 08-20-2018 06:08 AM

I’m not Mike but in my experience, asking if you should or shouldn’t, definitely means you shouldn’t. But doing something you shouldn’t, definitely leads to stories.

-- Rick M, http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

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Woodmaster1

1058 posts in 2758 days


#2 posted 08-20-2018 08:45 AM

Epoxy is your friend use it. We have people at the club shop turn amazing bowls from wood with cracks. Sometimes it fails but when it works wow.

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OSU55

1920 posts in 2161 days


#3 posted 08-20-2018 11:44 AM

I turn many pieces with cracks. I keep the speed down and stay out of the rotational plane just in case. As more wood comes off I either gain confidence with the piece and finish, or it looks iffy and throw it away. Either way you learn something.

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Fresch

341 posts in 2092 days


#4 posted 08-20-2018 12:07 PM

Put a face shield on.

View Underdog's profile

Underdog

1206 posts in 2207 days


#5 posted 08-20-2018 12:14 PM

IF you do, and many of us recommend NOT turning cracked up wood, take as many precautions as you can.
DO wear a GOOD face shield.
Do wear body armor.
Do stand out of the “line-of-fire”.
Do make SURE you’re turning at slow speeds.
DO use lots of glue to kill the cracks.
DO use duct tape to keep it from flying apart.

Woodturners are a small, tight-knit group, and we are aware that in the past 10 years, several of our members have been severely injured or outright killed by their work blowing up in their face.

-- Jim, Georgia, USA

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TheDane

5534 posts in 3834 days


#6 posted 08-20-2018 12:21 PM

Quoting the great John Jordan: “Life is too short to turn crappy wood.”

-- Gerry -- "I don't plan to ever really grow up ... I'm just going to learn how to act in public!"

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LeeMills

609 posts in 1472 days


#7 posted 08-20-2018 12:36 PM

I’m not sure how deep “not to deep” is.
I may follow most of Underdogs suggestions using a face plate and tails tock support., Turn one side to remove the cracks then turn the other. You may still have a 2.5 deep bowl which is plenty deep.
My biggest concern is that there are cracks on Both sides which doesn’t seem normal, maybe ring shake?

-- We cannot solve our problems with the same thinking we used when we created them. Albert Einstein

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TheFridge

10499 posts in 1657 days


#8 posted 08-20-2018 12:59 PM

Maybe if it was alder. Ash? Just glorified firewood.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

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Wildwood

2448 posts in 2306 days


#9 posted 08-20-2018 02:52 PM

Without a picture who here knows for sure! Think it’s time you learn to read the wood you want to turn.

Is that bowl blank safe to turn or could you do something else with it?

Wood defects can be a blessing or a curse! Will defect add interest to your design or detract from it?

Take a look at what others have turned.

https://www.bing.com/images/search?q=wood+turned+bowls+with+cracks&qs=n&form=QBILPG&sp=-1&pq=wood+turned+bowls+with+cracks&sc=0-29&sk=&cvid=3760D3DA30A54B459CB40AC0B6B7EECB

Beside great help already posted hope this helps you to decide!

-- Bill

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Nubsnstubs

1414 posts in 1901 days


#10 posted 08-20-2018 03:04 PM



Quoting the great John Jordan: “Life is too short to turn crappy wood.”

- TheDane

As Nubsnstubs would say, “There is no such thing as crappy wood”. I’m not condoning turning stuff that will hurt you , but there are ways to stabilize most woods. Some definitely need liquid stabilizers while some, in Mike’s case, sound like he could use something as simple as dowels to span the cracks to stabilize them. As long as you get glue into the dowel hole and on the dowel, the piece will stay together. Remember the saying, glue is stronger than the wood. Dowels are much easier to do than butterflies.

All you need to do is know how to drill into the sides of a round form.(instruction forthcoming if requested) Some pieces could be drilled while still in a blank form, and if you completely turn out the dowel, at least you had some piece of mind and security while turning it. So far, I’ve turned about 60 pieces from 3”od to 18” od using dowels to save the wood with only one failure, which in turn took out my camera cord. ..................

Below is just one piece I’ve turned using a dowel to bridge the crack you can see starting at the tenon and then continuing up to the sap wood.

Standing out of the line of fire is the key to turning without mishaps. Stop your lathe often to check for anything that looks like it could be a hazard to you. Make the necessary adjustments for safe turning. If you are almost dome with something that looks like it going to be really nice, but but has a defect that can’t be repaired, toss it and start another piece….........Jerry (in Tucson)

-- Jerry (in Tucson) www.woodturnerstools.com

View Karda's profile

Karda

1303 posts in 725 days


#11 posted 08-20-2018 05:42 PM

thanks Jerry I didn’t think of dowels, I started turning and it don’t look as bad as I thought. I decided since I am not creative to do a simple round bowl. here are some pics of the cracks.Yea i would like to learn more about using dowels.

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MrUnix

7001 posts in 2370 days


#12 posted 08-20-2018 05:59 PM

I wouldn’t worry about those – they are tiny and should not cause you any problems. For larger ones, or if still present when just about done turning, epoxy is your friend.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

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Nubsnstubs

1414 posts in 1901 days


#13 posted 08-20-2018 06:38 PM

What Brad says. Those “cracks” are features for your future turning. Nothing to be overly cautious of. More than likely you will turn most out before done.Like I said earlier, check it often as you are turning it.

What I see that gives me concern is that small tenon you are using. I know that’s what the chuck mfger’s state as the proper tenon size for the chuck. I lost about 7-8 pieces following that “full contact” tenon size when I first started turning due to my tenons breaking. On my G3 with 50mm jaws, my tenons were increased to 2 1/4”, and have lost only 2 pieces out of possibly a 1000 starts. One was a burl that just separated without cause, and the other was a piece of bug ridden Palo Verde just about 2 weeks ago. Try it if you start losing your stuff because of tenon breakage. .............. Jerry (in Tucson)

-- Jerry (in Tucson) www.woodturnerstools.com

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JADobson

1237 posts in 2282 days


#14 posted 08-20-2018 07:14 PM


Woodturners are a small, tight-knit group, and we are aware that in the past 10 years, several of our members have been severely injured or outright killed by their work blowing up in their face.

- Underdog

There was a girl killed on a metal lathe in 2011. Never heard of anyone else being killed on a lathe.

-- No craft is very far from the line beyond which is magic. -- Lord Dunsany — Instagram @grailwoodworks

View Karda's profile

Karda

1303 posts in 725 days


#15 posted 08-20-2018 07:45 PM

ok thanks

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