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Forum topic by Logan Windram posted 08-19-2018 11:31 PM 478 views 0 times favorited 5 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Logan Windram

347 posts in 2639 days


08-19-2018 11:31 PM

So, my shop/ garage is built, currently in the seal up and insulate phase, then sheet rock, then electrical, etc… should be up an running next December at this point… lol…

anyways-

I have left one wall in the garage empty and directly across from windows on the adjacent wall. My thought it this. Can I install a fairly decent sized exhaust fan, variable speed and use it to spray finishes? I envision a breakdown top and sides that could be quickly constructed for finishing, and a small panel of filters hung in front of the fanto catch the overspray… when not being used I could construct a cover with insulation so its not open and bleeding cool/ warm air… I could hand the breakdown top/ sides on the wall aside when not being used, or hinge them and fold and store in the attic. So really, a spray booth that can be put up quickly, broken down quickly, etc.

-I don’t have any open flames, just electrical in the garage, am I facing a combustion issue?
- I don’t have a way to isolate the shop from the booth, so I’d have to clean the snot out of that place before flowing air through and spraying.. .not ideal, but at least managable.
- am I being dumb here, and not just building spray finished into the price of a project I do for others… I probably wouldn’t use lacquer/ conversion varnish on projects for my house, I usually use Osmo.
- I get alot of request for built-ins and cabinet type work- spraying would be a really nice option to have.

Thoughts would be appreciated as usual. Anybosy who has a temp/ set-up and breakdown set-up would be helpful to hear the good, bad in between,

thank you-

B


5 replies so far

View BurlyBob's profile

BurlyBob

5937 posts in 2443 days


#1 posted 08-20-2018 04:04 AM

I’ll Pm you with some ideas.

View OSU55's profile

OSU55

1930 posts in 2167 days


#2 posted 08-20-2018 11:59 AM

I use “roman blinds” I made from 6mil? sheet plastic. The “walls” roll up to the ceiling when not in use. I only use 3 walls – the open end is away from the main work area where most of the dust is. The “room” is 10’x 10’. I use a 1000 cfm ac type blower that i built into a cabinet with 2 25”x25” filters. The cabinet has a short 8” dia duct to which I can attach a piece of flex duct and run outside. I sweep up/vacuum the obvious dust. Then turn on the blower for 20-30 min to clean the air before spraying (the blower is my shop dust filter as well). Dont have issues with in finishes.

I can spray solvent finishes when its nice enough outside to vent, but during the winter I spray water base so I dont need to vent.

View Planeman40's profile

Planeman40

1283 posts in 2938 days


#3 posted 08-20-2018 05:28 PM

I envision a “shower curtain” type enclosure from ceiling to floor that can be pulled around the area. Easy to make, doenn’t take up room, cheap materials.

-- Always remember: It is a mathematical certainty that half the people in this country are below average in intelligence!

View jbay's profile

jbay

2768 posts in 1076 days


#4 posted 08-20-2018 05:54 PM

One thing to take into consideration, For air to go out, air needs to get in.

I had a spray room that moved a lot of air out. I had doors into the room that had filters to let air into the room.

I don’t know how sealed your room will be, you may not have to do anything, but it’s worth considering.

-- “Hanging onto resentment, is letting someone you despise live rent-free in your head.” (Ann Landers)......

View TungOil's profile

TungOil

1040 posts in 672 days


#5 posted 08-21-2018 04:06 AM

Stick to water based Finishes like Target or GF and you should be ok. I would not spray solvent based unless your blower and lights/switches are explosion proof. Insurance will not cover you if you are spraying solvent based without the proper precautions.

-- The optimist says "the glass is half full". The pessimist says "the glass is half empty". The engineer says "the glass is twice as big as it needs to be"

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