LumberJocks

Speaker stand joinery help!

  • Advertise with us

« back to Woodworking Skill Share forum

Forum topic by SoCalDJ posted 07-24-2011 02:13 AM 1806 views 0 times favorited 13 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View SoCalDJ's profile

SoCalDJ

46 posts in 1308 days


07-24-2011 02:13 AM

So after two years of living in my house I finally took the time to rip out the baseboards and run surround speaker wire/junction boxes.

It was after this I realized that my old speaker stands were about 12 inches too short, so with a bunch of extra wood in the garage, I decided I was going to make/design my own!

So here’s the plan (keep in mind I’m no sketch up expert so this is really rough!)

The hardest part is where I’m stuck and looking for help on. My couch has baseball stitching so I wanted the stands to have somewhat of the same look. So I’ve got maple and walnut pieces that are going to run up the sides in that pattern.

Here’s a few pictures of where I sit in the project. And you’ll see where I’m stuck!

So everything lines up and is the correct size and everything (And even if it wasn’t I could sand it down once I get the column glued up!

But here’s the dilemma, how to I attach all those little pieces to the sides, AND then glue it up? I was thinking dowels as you can see I already laid them out. Partly because I need these stands to be as sturdy as possible so the speakers can’t displace them in any way shape or form and deteriorate my sound quality!

What is the best way to get these little pieces all glued up/clamped, and then glued/clamped to the side pieces? I was just planning on butt joints to be simple but I guess it wouldn’t be too out there to toss the dado stack in the table saw and cut a rabbit on the long pieces. I’ve got a bunch of 36” clamps which are the exact length of the panels, but that’s as big as I’ve got.

Help! I need ideas/techniques for the glue up and joinery!


13 replies so far

View PurpLev's profile

PurpLev

8476 posts in 2305 days


#1 posted 07-24-2011 02:20 AM

since its long grain to long grain, just glueing them up would be as secure as possible. doweling might help when you need to align things but does not add any physical strength to the joint (on the contrary it reduces the long grain to long grain contact surface).

unless I’m missing something here, you should just glue them up as is with wood glue.

-- ㊍ When in doubt - There is no doubt - Go the safer route.

View SoCalDJ's profile

SoCalDJ

46 posts in 1308 days


#2 posted 07-24-2011 02:48 AM

Gotcha.

Alignment will be critical because there’s so many little pieces. Any tips on clamping something that long/big?

View PurpLev's profile

PurpLev

8476 posts in 2305 days


#3 posted 07-24-2011 03:00 AM

yeah, once piece at a time, make sure everything stays aligned. don’t try to rush it or some pieces may creep out on you and throw the alignment off. other than that, aside from the fact there are a larger number of pieces than just 4, it’s a pretty straight forward and simple glue up process. just take your time with it and youll end up with a strong column

-- ㊍ When in doubt - There is no doubt - Go the safer route.

View Lee Barker's profile

Lee Barker

2163 posts in 1507 days


#4 posted 07-24-2011 03:05 AM

First, a +1 for echoing the couch stitching. Very observant and clever.

First, put the dowels back in the drawer. Unneeded.

I like the rabbet in the walnut pieces, but it needn’t require your dado head. Just take an eighth with the table saw so you have a shoulder to index to.

Now glue your starter piece in and clamp it. 4x.

When that sets up—as soon as an hour, less if it’s warmer—glue the next piece on, clamping the butt joint as well as the joint to the rabbet. 4x.

And so on.When all that is done, then you can hand plane or joint the newly created edges, and glue the cap on.

One hint: If the butt joint doesn’t go perfectly tight, back sand it or pare it a little so the front eighth makes good true contact.

Make sure your 36” clamps can reach the last piece. If not, I’d suggest trimming the piece off a bit.

These are gonna look great!

Kindly,

Lee

-- "...in his brain, which is as dry as the remainder biscuit after a voyage, he hath strange places cramm'd with observation, the which he vents in mangled forms." --Shakespeare, "As You Like It"

View SoCalDJ's profile

SoCalDJ

46 posts in 1308 days


#5 posted 07-24-2011 07:42 AM

Ok so I decided to just go with a rabbet, look I spelled it right this time!

Tossed the dado stack in the table saw (Mostly just so it was clean from the get go and I didn’t have to clean it up at all).

The primary reason was just to give myself a resting point in which to help keep clamping pressure.

I made two 36” cauls out of a 2/4 I had laying around and this made clamping super easy! Looks like my 36” clamps would go the long way so I had to rely on some 40” F-Clamps I had laying around and another couple of small cauls.

And here’s a dry fit of the second column so you can see where I’m going with this!

Can’t really show a pic of the couch stitching (baby is sleeping in his swing and turning on the lights for a picture is just not worth it!

I hope to get some of the detail work on the base and the top tomorrow, and get the other column glued up tomorrow night.

I’m thinking just dowels to join the top and base to the column, what do you guys think? Especially since it’ll be end grain on long grain…

I could use screws too for easy disassembly down the road if I ever needed to…

View bubinga's profile

bubinga

861 posts in 1324 days


#6 posted 07-24-2011 08:53 AM

The last pair of Speaker stands for surround speakers , I made, I cut a horse shoe shape on the front of the base,
this allows the front of the base to go around couch, or table legs, so you can place the speakers just where you need them, and the base is still stable.
If I can get my daughter to take pics, and send them to me , i’ll show you
Nice design BTW

-- E J ------- Always Keep a Firm Grip on Your Tool

View Lee Barker's profile

Lee Barker

2163 posts in 1507 days


#7 posted 07-24-2011 04:39 PM

Nice work. I hope your reveling in the satisfaction of conceiving the design and now executing it.

There are lots of ways to attach things here. I’d be inclined to dowel a male piece to the center of the base and insert it in the void and run a couple screws up from the bottom into the endgrain of the column.

Top could be roughly the same, and you could countersink the screws and leave them there—the speaker will cover them, right?

I like bubinga’s idea of the notched base. Very practical and spiffy.

Kindly,

Lee

-- "...in his brain, which is as dry as the remainder biscuit after a voyage, he hath strange places cramm'd with observation, the which he vents in mangled forms." --Shakespeare, "As You Like It"

View SoCalDJ's profile

SoCalDJ

46 posts in 1308 days


#8 posted 07-24-2011 06:21 PM

I like the idea of the horseshoe, but I don’t know if it will actually knew needed for my setup, my couch back is a bit angled, and I don’t think the base is actually going to make it all the way under the couch.

If you could get some pictures that’d be great! I did a TON of searching online for other woodworker’s speaker stands to pull inspiration from.

The center needs to have a hole to run the wire through, so I’m going to have to at minimum leave that area open to run the wire. Those will be some pretty long screws to go through the base (1 3/4” of base!) but I do like the idea of being able to replace the base down the road if my needs change.

I defiantly don’t want to screw the top in though, I really want a clean look up top. Dowels for sure on that. The only other option in my opinion would be mortise and tenon, but that’s a bit overkill in my opinion. Wish I had a biscuit joiner or one of those domino thingys, that would be perfect for this!

Love the tips though! Anyone else like to chime in?

View teejk's profile

teejk

1215 posts in 1341 days


#9 posted 07-24-2011 07:16 PM

sounds like you want a pristine top…could try nailing block(s) (sized to the opening) secured to the underside of the top…then secure with a screw or two on the side(s)

another thing you might want to consider is to pre-stain the pieces before you use the glue bottle AND make sure to mop up any excess glue before it sets.

View SoCalDJ's profile

SoCalDJ

46 posts in 1308 days


#10 posted 07-24-2011 07:44 PM

Remember I need to run wire through the column still! If I plug up the inside then I’d have to drill through it to get that accomplished. If I can hide the joinery in any way to make the whole piece look clean, I’d like to!

Once I get the columns glued up I plan to square and sand down each piece before joining all three together. Then add finish, and finally glue up. I didn’t see the need to finish before the tedious process of gluing all those tiny little blocks together.

Hopefully the kids cooperate today and I can get some progress done!

View mrg's profile

mrg

521 posts in 1656 days


#11 posted 07-24-2011 08:41 PM

You could make the top with just a cap, this will make it easier to run the wires. Make the top base with a block under it that fits the column so you can pop it off and fish the wire up. Cut a slot at the top of the column to run the wire to the speaker.

-- mrg

View teejk's profile

teejk

1215 posts in 1341 days


#12 posted 07-24-2011 09:37 PM

SoCal

I tried this once…big circles on the bottom for bases…tiny circles in the top just big enough to rest the speakers. In my case I found that the speaker wire had to come out the back side of the stand since the terminals are on the back of the speaker…there was no way to route it through the top since there was no “chase” built into the speaker base. I ended up with a small loop exiting near the top at the rear that faced a wall. Speaker wire is pretty small and hardly noticeable. Doing something like that would meet your desire to be able to “knock it down”...remove the tops and bottoms and leave the wire where it is.

View bubinga's profile

bubinga

861 posts in 1324 days


#13 posted 07-25-2011 10:09 AM

Sorry forgot to call my daughter, but I just sent a text,to ask her for pics
The horse shoe base design is much more versatile for placement,if you move to new house or, rearrange your room,somthing woman,you know like to do !!
I have designed,and built a few differant kinds of stands,and ran into placement problems, and this last design solved some of them. The next surround speaker stands, I think may have adjustable height with a ratcheting,mechanism, generally,some where along these lines here. Could be incorporated many, many ways.
Anyway !! I like the contrasting wood in yours :)

Courtesy of Rick, An L J member

-- E J ------- Always Keep a Firm Grip on Your Tool

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

GardenTenders.com :: gardening showcase