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Forum topic by Alex1453 posted 07-24-2011 04:36 PM 4236 views 0 times favorited 51 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Alex1453

12 posts in 1161 days


07-24-2011 04:36 PM

Topic tags/keywords: saw circular saw power tool question woodworking brand

Ironically, after coming on here and lambasting any “Made in China” power tools, the obvious happened- UPS promptly delivered my Bosch 1677M circular saw that was (you guessed it) made in China. (OK, quit laughing) So, can anyone recommend a decent, reasonably priced (not Festool money), made-anywhere-but-China circular saw? Also, yeah, I have considered eBay (used or NIB), though I would prefer to buy from a more reputable retailer if possible. So, any suggestions?

-- Alex


51 replies so far

View lew's profile

lew

10036 posts in 2414 days


#1 posted 07-24-2011 04:40 PM

Makita, mine has worked flawlessly for years. well built.

-- Lew- Time traveler. Purveyor of the Universe's finest custom rolling pins.

View crank49's profile

crank49

3435 posts in 1629 days


#2 posted 07-24-2011 04:53 PM

My “Skil”saw was made in Chicago.

In 1977.

We might as well get used to China Tools.

Your computer was made there along with probably 90% of every thing you have used today. Clock radio, cell phone, computer, tv, coffee pot, kitchen faucet, sink. towels. The list is endless and depressing.

-- Michael :-{| “If you tell a big enough lie and tell it frequently enough, it will be believed.” ― A H

View jim C's profile

jim C

1452 posts in 1757 days


#3 posted 07-24-2011 05:21 PM

ditto MAKITA

ANYTHING Makita.

-- When I was a boy, I was told "anyone can be President", now I'm beginning to believe it!

View Greg..the Cajun  Box Sculptor's profile

Greg..the Cajun Box Sculptor

5115 posts in 1967 days


#4 posted 07-24-2011 05:33 PM

We should all learn to speak chinese. They sadly seem to be Americas new business landlord and American large business owners are doing all they can to help speed the process along.
The only made in America products to be found will be the collectable antiques.

-- If retiring is having the time to be able to do what you enjoy then I have always been retired.

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Sawkerf

1730 posts in 1727 days


#5 posted 07-24-2011 08:18 PM

FWIW, China is losing some of the manufacturing jobs to other Asian countries with lower labor costs. Over the past few years, China has seen a significant increase in worker pay and now they are having to compete with other countries to get the jobs. My Chinese sister in law tells me that many of her friends and family now live comfortably middle class lives.

IMO, “Made in China” isn’t necessarily a warning label. They manufacture stuff to whatever specs they’re given and bad products often result from bad specs instead of poor work.

-- Adversity doesn't build character...................it reveals it.

View SCOTSMAN's profile

SCOTSMAN

5374 posts in 2244 days


#6 posted 07-24-2011 08:35 PM

I find it hard to believe that working people in China are being treated fairly.It just doesn’t add up. we still cannot compete or else we would.One day they might make such demands but for now I can’t see the Chinese government giving in to such demands after all they can’t go on strike can they ? The government are calling the shots big time IMHO Alistair

-- excuse my typing as I have a form of parkinsons disease

View pierce85's profile

pierce85

508 posts in 1221 days


#7 posted 07-24-2011 09:24 PM

From Robert Scott of the Economic Policy Institute (full article here: http://www.epi.org/publications/entry/bp260/):

China’s entry into the WTO has further tilted the international economic playing field against domestic workers and firms and in favor of multinational companies from the United States and other countries as well as state- and privately owned exporters in China. This shift has increased the global “race to the bottom” in wages and environmental quality and closed thousands of U.S. factories, decimating employment in a wide range of communities, states, and entire regions of the United States. U.S. national interests have suffered while U.S. multinationals have enjoyed record profits on their foreign direct investments (Scott 2008).

View Lee Barker's profile

Lee Barker

2166 posts in 1509 days


#8 posted 07-24-2011 11:11 PM

Your question was to recommend a saw. If you are in the US, you’ll find plenty of good, used worm drive saws at hock shops and used tool places. Many will be US made. For years the Skilsaw was the only player, and it is a great saw.

(Except the time in the late seventies when hundreds of blade guards broke at the hub.)

A comment from another LJ helped me to form a philosophy of spending, if you will, in my business: “Keep the dollars as close to home as possible.” It seems a reasonable and workable way to consider all the aspects of a pending purchase, not just the COO of the tool, in order to get the best-balanced value.

Kindly,

Lee

-- "...in his brain, which is as dry as the remainder biscuit after a voyage, he hath strange places cramm'd with observation, the which he vents in mangled forms." --Shakespeare, "As You Like It"

View ChuckM's profile

ChuckM

501 posts in 2325 days


#9 posted 07-25-2011 03:02 AM

“I can’t see the Chinese government giving in to such demands after all they can’t go on strike can they ? The government are calling the shots big time IMHO Alistair”

For the record, Chinese workers cannot go on strike but they can rebel and it has happened repeatedly in recent times (of course, the news is not reported in this part of the world—but if you live in Asia, Hong Kong in particular which has huge investments in China, you see that in the news all the time). Now, the Chinese gov’t has to maintain social stability (that’s the #1 political objective now) and increasing the living standards (through wage hikes) is part of the tactics achieving that. The Chinese is losing some business to its neighboring countries because of increasing domestic wages. In a way, China will be more like Japan 30 or 40 years ago in 20 or 30 years as it moves its manufacturing industry upscale into high tech stuff. The low end stuff is increasing shifted ot other third world countries. Who knows? May be in 50 years, woodworkers would embrace and chase after China-made woodworking machines as many do today after Japanese vehicles.

-- The time I enjoy wasting is not time wasted

View Sawkerf's profile

Sawkerf

1730 posts in 1727 days


#10 posted 07-25-2011 03:33 AM

Scotsman -

How do you define “fair” treatment? AFIK, Chinese workers are rreated “fairly” – based on their definitions of fair. I’ve heard many people claim that Chinese don’t get a “living wage”, but that’s in terms of U.S. standards which really aren’t applicable there.

-- Adversity doesn't build character...................it reveals it.

View Grandpa's profile

Grandpa

3136 posts in 1334 days


#11 posted 07-25-2011 06:15 AM

Skil here but mine is 16 years old.

View David Grimes's profile

David Grimes

2072 posts in 1298 days


#12 posted 07-25-2011 06:24 AM

I bet 80% or more of the framers around here have been using the blue Makita’s for the last 15 years. Of course, they all block the safety with a wedge.

Of corded, I have an old Craftsman that I rarely use. What I want is the corded Skil trim saw that is reversed perspective like a worm gear. I used one (a buddy’s) and have wanted one ever since. I missed one last year marked down at Lowe’s to $79 (they’re usually in the $100 to $120 range). I like the “worm gear” perspective much better than standard (which has always seemed backwards to my right-handed self). Real worm gears are just too big and heavy.

-- If you're going to stir the pot, think BIG spoon or SMALL boat paddle. David Grimes, Georgia

View PutnamEco's profile

PutnamEco

155 posts in 1945 days


#13 posted 07-25-2011 06:33 AM

If you don’t want Chinese, your going to have to pay for the privilege. Mafell and Hilti are the only options beside Festool/Protool that I know of. I think Hilti may be headed towards Asian production as well, though.

I would be willing to pay for an American made clone of Black & Deckers original Sawcat done in carbon fiber and titanium

-- “The test of our progress is not whether we add more to the abundance of those who have much; it is whether we provide enough for those who have too little.” ― Franklin D. Roosevelt

View crank49's profile

crank49

3435 posts in 1629 days


#14 posted 07-25-2011 05:19 PM

Look on the bright side. At the rate we are going, we will be one of those third world countries that will be able to compete with China for jobs in the near future.

-- Michael :-{| “If you tell a big enough lie and tell it frequently enough, it will be believed.” ― A H

View teejk's profile

teejk

1215 posts in 1343 days


#15 posted 07-25-2011 05:55 PM

Alex

you made me go look at my Bosch! It’s a CS20 and says “made in the USA” but is 2-3 years old now so maybe that’s changed (a great saw by the way even if a little heavy).

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