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LARGE miter cut

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Forum topic by SoCalDJ posted 07-23-2011 12:58 AM 1421 views 0 times favorited 19 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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SoCalDJ

46 posts in 1337 days


07-23-2011 12:58 AM

Topic tags/keywords: miter speaker large workpiece

So I’m still new to woodworking and had a quick question, after about 3 hours of Google searches and a few wood working forum searches.

I’ve got a 12”x12” 8/4 piece of cherry.

I need to cut it at about a 15 degree angle to that the dimensions are 12”x8” at a 15 degree angle LONGWAYS.

I’ve got a table saw, and a 10” sliding miter saw as two tools to get this accomplished with.

What’s the best way to attack this? this is going to angle a center channel speaker up since it’s sitting on the floor at the moment until I remount my TV and build an entertainment center!


19 replies so far

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WayneC

12292 posts in 2782 days


#1 posted 07-23-2011 01:02 AM

Bandsaw with 12” of cutting depth. Not sure how you would do it with the tools you indicate.

-- We must guard our enthusiasm as we would our life - James Krenov

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Arch_E

47 posts in 1207 days


#2 posted 07-23-2011 01:09 AM

Wish that I KNEW THE answer. I don’t. But I do have some warnings: Beware of handling this block at a 15 degree tilt on the tablesaw. That might be “kickback” and/or a blade accident situation. Remember, if it feels wrong, STOP! I’ve got a bandsaw but not 12” of throat clearance. I would expect to have to clean up such a cut from the band saw, since my experience for 10” of resawing in thick (8/4) wood is that the blade can wander.

Now, I’ve got a great set of handsaws (rip and crosscut). I would not hesitate to make such a cut with these. But, I would expect to clean it up, as well, with hand planes. To sum up, the TS lacks the blade depth (and safety) and the BS lacks the guiding mechanism—unless you have a jig to use with the table right tilt. Handsaws might solve this, but it would take patience, and time!!

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Ritty

63 posts in 1481 days


#3 posted 07-23-2011 01:27 AM

bandsaw or a couple of dados then use a hand plane in a vise or u could always just make a series of kerf cuts and then knock off the wood with a hammer then sand it, but y use cherry why not plywood?

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SoCalDJ

46 posts in 1337 days


#4 posted 07-23-2011 01:30 AM

Hmmm. I do have a large handsaws and could clean it up afterwards.

I don’t have a bandsaw yet, and probably won’t for a while, just not enough space in my shop nor funding.

What about unconventional techniques? Could I cut it in two and resaw it on the table/miter saw and then glue it back together? I know this would make the grain not match 100%...

What about a tapering jig of some kind?

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SoCalDJ

46 posts in 1337 days


#5 posted 07-23-2011 01:32 AM

bandsaw or a couple of dados then use a hand plane in a vise or u could always just make a series of kerf cuts and then knock off the wood with a hammer then sand it, but y use cherry why not plywood?

Because I’ve got this block of cherry sitting unused in my garage at the moment!

How would I setup the cut with the dados on the table saw?

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WayneC

12292 posts in 2782 days


#6 posted 07-23-2011 01:45 AM

Some brainstorming….

A frame saw would be another option…... http://www.hyperkitten.com/woodworking/resaw.php3

Power planer and some sort of Sled…..

Look for a fellow LJ in the area with a large bandsaw….

-- We must guard our enthusiasm as we would our life - James Krenov

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Sumdume

71 posts in 1519 days


#7 posted 07-23-2011 02:02 AM

Have you considered taking it to a local cabinet maker or wood working store and pating them to make the cut safely?

-- Rule # 1 - Don't mix yer blood and sawdust!

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levan

410 posts in 1664 days


#8 posted 07-23-2011 02:12 AM

Possibly another option might be to rip the board into 1” or so strips and make a three sided frame. I think it would be much easier to bevel the front and taper the sides before assembly. best wishes

-- Lynn "If you think you can do a thing or think you can't do a thing, you're right". Henry Ford

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lew

10087 posts in 2440 days


#9 posted 07-23-2011 02:32 AM

Using the last two posts as a stepping off point. 2-3” wide pieces sliced off of a 2×12 x 12. The whittle away using a jointer. Set the leading edge on the out feed table and push thru- with a push pad. Glue up the finished pieces.

-- Lew- Time traveler. Purveyor of the Universe's finest custom rolling pins.

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Loren

7714 posts in 2333 days


#10 posted 07-23-2011 03:26 AM

While the cut can be done on a bandsaw, realistically I’d bet you would
screw it up.

The cut can be made with relative ease combining the table saw
and hand tools however. Rip to 8”, then cut at an angle on the
table saw from each edge, then finish the cut with a handsaw
guided in the kerfs from the table saw blade. Plane off the
excess and you’ve got two wedges.

I think the angle will be 22.5 degrees assuming your stock is
4 times wider than it is thick.

The easy way is to get 2 pieces of cherry and plane each to
the shape you want.

-- http://lawoodworking.com

View 1yeldud1's profile

1yeldud1

291 posts in 1727 days


#11 posted 07-23-2011 03:31 AM

I think I would try to find a router and construct a set of router “ski’s” – I’d tip this block up on the angle desitred and “surface” the top of the wedge using the router ski’s to establish the 15 degree angle. Please note it would require a “Jig” to hold the block on this angle – BUT it wouldnt be a very difficult project.

View David Kirtley's profile

David Kirtley

1281 posts in 1683 days


#12 posted 07-23-2011 03:44 AM

It would be pretty easy on a planer or with a hand plane. Prop it up at the angle you want and plane the top off level.

-- Woodworking shouldn't cost a fortune: http://lowbudgetwoodworker.blogspot.com/

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Ritty

63 posts in 1481 days


#13 posted 07-23-2011 04:24 AM

u would make one deep dado cut were the most would is needed to be taken off then move down the line making a shallower dado cut untill u dont to make one then alot of sanding or handplaning it would be safer then using the table saw, let me know how it turns out

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Cosmicsniper

2199 posts in 1843 days


#14 posted 07-23-2011 05:27 AM

A planer would make quick work of this. So would a large bandsaw.

But I think I’d use a large hand saw and then clean it up with hand planes, especially if you precut it on the table saw like Loren said…actually, it’s not all that hard that way.

-- jay, www.allaboutastro.com

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BobTheFish

361 posts in 1237 days


#15 posted 07-23-2011 06:01 AM

I would use a combination of planes and sanders to get it down.

Use some plywood to cut safer triangles with a fifteen degree angle to act as props to hold your wood at the angle, and maybe a base around it to support the wood and act as an outer “guide” (basically a box holding the wood at a fifteen degree angle). Then plane down till you get near lying “flat” with the sides of the box, and take a belt sander to it to finish it off and take out any uneveness from the narrower planes.

Yes, it’s more work, and yes, there’s more dust and shavings, but it’s far safer, and you’ll have better control over the cut, and less “wobble” from a bandsaw and less danger/ chance of slippage with a table saw….

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