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Electrical newbie thinking of rewiring bandsaw to 220v

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Forum topic by Elizabeth posted 07-22-2011 05:32 PM 2314 views 0 times favorited 48 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Elizabeth

803 posts in 1800 days


07-22-2011 05:32 PM

Topic tags/keywords: bandsaw rewiring electrical

I have a Grizzly 14” G0555 bandsaw currently wired for 110v. The specs say it can be rewired for 220v. I have a spare 220v socket in the ceiling almost above the bandsaw (put in and checked by an electrician last year).

I am thinking about rewiring the bandsaw for 220 because a) I might as well since I have the socket and the capability and b) it’ll solve a problem I currently have regarding an extension cord that runs from the bandsaw to a 110v socket on the wall. But I am a COMPLETE electrical newbie. Has anyone done this and can give me some advice on how to proceed? For example, the first thing I need to do is buy the components that I’ll need to wire in, but I don’t know what I need to buy. Suitable capacity cord, obviously, and a 220v plug for the end. Anything else?

My husband has a bit of electrical experience from university studies and is willing to check over my work when I’m done. He is also the one who wired a plug onto the end of my 220v Grizzly jointer (it didn’t come with one!).

I thought about getting the electrician from last year back in but he seems ever so slightly unreliable; I had asked him about rewiring the bandsaw and he said he’d be happy to get the parts necessary and contact me when he was ready, and I never heard back, even after I called him about it once to follow up.

If anyone knows of a reasonably priced electrician in the Eugene Oregon area I’d be happy to look into their services!


48 replies so far

View Paul's profile

Paul

345 posts in 2246 days


#1 posted 07-22-2011 05:55 PM

On the motor you should find a screwed on cap that covers the current 110v connections, inside that cap you will usually find a diagram for the connections required to change over to 220v.
You will need a cord that is 3 conductor plus ground, usually a white, black, and red colored wire plus a bare copper wire, I would probably go with a 12 gauge wire that would be plenty heavy enough.
All you need to buy is the wire (get about 5 feet more than you think you need), and the plug for the end, plus maybe a couple of ‘wire nuts’ to make the connection at the motor.
Just follow the new connection diagram carefully by matching the colors on the wire to the diagram. Should not take more than about 15 min..

-- If you say 'It's good enough', it probably isn't.

View Don W's profile

Don W

15037 posts in 1224 days


#2 posted 07-22-2011 05:56 PM

I’m not an electrician and I don’t play one on TV, but I’ve done this several times. Here is what I’ve always done. There should be 2 wiring diagrams on your motor, one for 220 and one for 110. You’ll need to convert the motor to the 220 hookup. The difference is 110 has one live leg, 220 has 2, so power is coming through both black and white wires. You’ll then need to change the plug on the machine from a 110 plug to a 220. You will also need a 220 outlet run from the breaker box if you don’t already have one.

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.com

View Eric_S's profile

Eric_S

1521 posts in 1852 days


#3 posted 07-22-2011 06:05 PM

As far as the wiring is concerned, the wiring diagrams for 110 and 220 are included in the manuals. If you don’t have one, they are available on grizzly’s site.

-- - Eric Indianapolis, IN

View Jim Bertelson's profile

Jim Bertelson

3664 posts in 1821 days


#4 posted 07-22-2011 06:12 PM

I suspect you don’t have to change the cord, because if it runs on 110, it will draw 10 amps or less on 220. So don’t buy a new cord unless instructions tell you to. My two saws and my dust collector are on 220 using the original cord, and for that much amps, you only need 2 conductor plus ground. 220 requirements do not need heavier gauge cord than 110 of the same amps, if I am not mistaken.

You do not need much knowlege to make the conversion. When you start adding circuits and doing your own wiring, then you need more knowledge and a recent code book. Best left to electricians for most folk.

-- Jim, Anchorage Alaska

View Elizabeth's profile

Elizabeth

803 posts in 1800 days


#5 posted 07-22-2011 06:14 PM

Great, thanks! I have the manual, Eric, so I’ll check out the diagrams. This seems straightforward enough. Paul, thanks for the advice on what to buy, I’ll swing by the store this weekend and grab some stuff.

Don I do have an outlet run from the breaker box so should be all set there. I had an electrician in last year who converted two existing outlets (for table saw and jointer) and installed a third (for the band saw). A fourth already existed which I may use for dust collection. He was happy with the breaker box and the general capacity of the system, so no worries there at least!

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Elizabeth

803 posts in 1800 days


#6 posted 07-22-2011 06:16 PM

Jim I’ll need to get a new cord anyway, as the one that is on the bandsaw falls about a foot short of reaching the ceiling where the receptacle is.

The receptacle on the ceiling points straight down. Do I need to consider any kind of stress relief device to handle the weight of the hanging cord? My table saw is also plugged into a ceiling receptacle and as far as I know doesn’t have any sort of stress relief on it.

View Elizabeth's profile

Elizabeth

803 posts in 1800 days


#7 posted 07-22-2011 06:36 PM

OK, I’ve looked up the wiring diagram for this saw, which is on page 43 of http://cdn0.grizzly.com/manuals/g0555_m.pdf .

I gather that the rectangle on the bottom, with six circled X’s and the grounding symbol, is for the wire. What are the six circled X’s, though? Do they represent each end of the three conductors?

So say the three colours of my wire are white, black and red as Paul suggested. Using that diagram, would I hook them up as follows? (I’m picking the wire colours almost at random; please tell me if there is a convention I have violated.)

Black motor wire → black conductor → end plug (which connector on the plug?)
Red and White motor wires → red conductor → nothing (really? nothing?)
Yellow motor wire → white conductor → end plug (which connector on the plug?)

View Jim Bertelson's profile

Jim Bertelson

3664 posts in 1821 days


#8 posted 07-22-2011 07:04 PM

Look at the socket in the ceiling. Is the receptacle for 3 or 4 wires? If it is for three, you only need a plug wiith thee prongs. Technically, there is such a thing as self supporting cord. I have some of that in 14 gauge. Bought it at HD. I don’t know what kind of arrangement you have with your ceiling receptacle, but you may have to make some sort of support for the cord, like attaching it to the ceiling, so the plug doesn’t fall out. Some receptacles turn and lock, then you don’t need a support.

Yes the saw only needs two conductors and a ground in the cord, as I suspected. Whatever cord you get should say 240 V on it, or higher. Most cords used for 110 will handle 220. However, the plug is different than 110. The black and the white conductor go to the power connnection terminals, and the ground wire (usually bare) goes to the ground. Take a picture of your receptacle. Then go to HD or Lowes or some such and find a receptacle like that one, and then find a plug that plugs into it. Make sure it is exactly like your picture. That is fairly fool proof. The plug should say it is for 220 for some level of amps. If it is 4 prong, then you have three hot wires, but you need only two. Get back to me if that is the case. You just have to pick two of them.

Gotta be gone for awhile….......

Later.

-- Jim, Anchorage Alaska

View Bertha's profile

Bertha

12951 posts in 1349 days


#9 posted 07-22-2011 07:07 PM

When I removed the cap on my TS, there was a wiring diagram there, clear as day. It was labeled so simply that as long as I unplugged the saw, I can’t see how I could have screwed it up. You might ask around which outlet and which cord is best recommended for your saw. I bought much more than I needed at Lowe’s and ended up spending a good bit of money on the 110 to 220 conversion. Good luck!

-- My dad and I built a 65 chev pick up.I killed trannys in that thing for some reason-Hog

View Blakep's profile

Blakep

232 posts in 1458 days


#10 posted 07-22-2011 07:12 PM

Elizabeth, I wired my grizzly bandsaw up to 220 as soon as I got it. I recomend looking at the diagram under the cover on the machine as mine was a little bit different layout than what was in the manual. The one one the bandsaw will be for that specific saw. The one in the manual could be a general overview of a few different model saws.

View Don W's profile

Don W

15037 posts in 1224 days


#11 posted 07-22-2011 07:13 PM

you just have to move the red wire from the pole on the left to the center pole. Then move the white wire from the right pole to the center pole. When you add a new plug as Jim suggested, the second line of your wire becomes hot. Make sense?

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.com

View rogerw's profile

rogerw

262 posts in 1346 days


#12 posted 07-22-2011 08:04 PM

my two cents here would have to be “electrical newbies” shouldn’t do their own wiring, especially 220. just sayin…..

-- >> my shop teacher used to say "do the best at everything you make for your mom because you're going to see it for the rest of your life!" <<

View CampD's profile

CampD

1202 posts in 2142 days


#13 posted 07-22-2011 08:27 PM

As far as for the ceiling mount and worring about it falling out you can get a 20a 110/220v twist lock plug (3 prong) you will need to get both a plug and receptacle. Used in vibration locations, like a generator.

-- Doug...

View Bertha's profile

Bertha

12951 posts in 1349 days


#14 posted 07-22-2011 09:06 PM

RogerW, I’d normally agree with you 100%. Having rewired my bandsaw and tablesaw, I’m not too concerned about the “saw” end of it. Now fussing with the “wall” end of it is another matter. I had the electrician wire everything and I just swapped the plug/outlet and saw wiring. As long as the saw is unplugged and she has a solid wiring diagram, I think it’s easily tackled by a careful novice.

-- My dad and I built a 65 chev pick up.I killed trannys in that thing for some reason-Hog

View Blakep's profile

Blakep

232 posts in 1458 days


#15 posted 07-22-2011 09:20 PM

I agree with you Bertha. As long as you follow the wiring diagram exactly then this is an easy project that a newbie to electric work can easily handle.

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