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DW735 Knife Durability

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Forum topic by BroncoBrian posted 08-15-2018 03:13 PM 694 views 1 time favorited 25 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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BroncoBrian

754 posts in 2074 days


08-15-2018 03:13 PM

I have seen comments from people stating that they have used the same knives for a year and other that they last 10 minutes.

I have been running ALDER through my planer and with less than 100 board feet, I already have lines in the finish. Are you not able to run anything through that planer with ANY knot or live edge bark remaining?

I watched one happen minutes after rotating the blades. I know that the blades are made from playdough and polished to look like metal, but ALDER is not very hard and I was able to knick off the bark with my fingernail.

-- I'd like to see a forklift lift a crate of forks. It'd be so damn literal!


25 replies so far

View johnstoneb's profile

johnstoneb

2999 posts in 2289 days


#1 posted 08-15-2018 03:20 PM

Bark has dirt and small bits of rock in it. If you don’t want nicks in the knives don’t run bark through your planer. If you run clean wood through the planer you won’t have the problem your having.

-- Bruce, Boise, ID

View Aj2's profile

Aj2

1654 posts in 1914 days


#2 posted 08-15-2018 03:27 PM

Your right alder is not very Hard but if your running rough sawn with knots you’ll have to pay the price.
It’s also practice to brush off you boards before jointing or planing. Soft woods like Alder will pick up sand or rock very easy. If the wood was stack on the ground or even loaded in the back of a pickup it needs attention before milling.
Infinity has 735 knives that are reported to hold up better.

-- Aj

View EarlS's profile

EarlS

1521 posts in 2464 days


#3 posted 08-15-2018 03:41 PM

A little sanding with a belt sander takes out the raised lines in no time. I don’t sweat the raised lines since I know I need to sand everything. When I start seeing indented lines I usually change the blades, or at least check them to see if there is a chunk broken off. Otherwise, I have not seen any longevity issues with the blades. Plus, they aren’t terribly expensive if you have to flip them or get new ones. I have 2 extra sets on hand since I got a deal on them a while back.

I hadn’t heard that Infinity might have after-market blades. I’ll have to check that out.

-- Earl "I'm a pessamist - generally that increases the chance that things will turn out better than expected"

View Lazyman's profile

Lazyman

2386 posts in 1503 days


#4 posted 08-15-2018 04:14 PM

I haven’t done it on my 735 yet but I think that you should be able to offset one of the blades so that the knicks on the blades do not line up to eliminate the lines caused by knicks. If the knives are still sharp, that will allow you to use them longer without replacing them.

Knots are hard on any planer’s knives. The manual suggests that you minimize the number of knots in the boards you run through. You really should remove all bark before running through the planer if you can and never run painted boards through a planer or jointer. I’ve run some pretty hard woods (hickory and live oak) through mine with no problems. I don’t use my 735 all that much and still have the original blades on it.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

View BigMig's profile

BigMig

458 posts in 2729 days


#5 posted 08-15-2018 04:41 PM

I’ve run a LOT of lumber through my 735 – lots of maple, cherry, some oak, lacewood, etc – but I take very light passes – and I imagine that this has contributed to the knife longevity.

And as has already been said – small lines are insignificant as final hand planing or sanding will erase them in no time.

-- Mike from Lansdowne, PA

View BroncoBrian's profile

BroncoBrian

754 posts in 2074 days


#6 posted 08-15-2018 04:58 PM



I haven t done it on my 735 yet but I think that you should be able to offset one of the blades so that the knicks on the blades do not line up to eliminate the lines caused by knicks. If the knives are still sharp, that will allow you to use them longer without replacing them.

- Lazyman

Great tip, there is a little play in them. I might do this.

I am probably being too picky as it will all be sanded. I get that. But a Shelix will be on the menu soon. This is annoying. Especially since I prefer a little more rustic material and will be using a lot of reclaimed wood.

-- I'd like to see a forklift lift a crate of forks. It'd be so damn literal!

View ChefHDAN's profile

ChefHDAN

1122 posts in 2966 days


#7 posted 08-15-2018 05:18 PM


I haven t done it on my 735 yet but I think that you should be able to offset one of the blades so that the knicks on the blades do not line up to eliminate the lines caused by knicks. If the knives are still sharp, that will allow you to use them longer without replacing them.

- Lazyman

Great tip, there is a little play in them. I might do this.

I am probably being too picky as it will all be sanded. I get that. But a Shelix will be on the menu soon. This is annoying. Especially since I prefer a little more rustic material and will be using a lot of reclaimed wood.

- BroncoBrian

This works, I’ve done it in my 735, also the tip for light passes, I never take more than a full turn when running dimensioning speed, and usually only a half turn for finishing, I still get some lines but they sand right off with the first 120 pass.

-- I've decided 1 mistake is really 2 opportunities to learn.. learn how to fix it... and learn how to not repeat it

View Jack Lewis's profile

Jack Lewis

317 posts in 1194 days


#8 posted 08-15-2018 05:23 PM

One tip I have used to eliminate the lines is to reverse the board if grain permits or stagger the entry point and run a second time at the same setting.

-- "PLUMBER'S BUTT! Get over it, everybody has one"

View Chad's profile

Chad

54 posts in 1226 days


#9 posted 08-15-2018 05:30 PM

I used the same blades on my DW735 for about a year before switching to the other side of them. The trick was to do light passes in fairly clean wood.

THEN, I had a friend want me to clean up their 6” wide Ipe decking planks for them. About 600 lf. I literally planed 8’ of it before the blades were shot. I thought that was weird so I put in new blades went back to work. About 8’-10’ more feet and blades were shot again.

So it all depends on what you’re doing.

Fast forward 1 week and I installed a new Byrd shelix head in my DW735 to finish that Ipe job. I ran the remaining 580ish lf with no slowdown. In fact, after doing that heavy job I then used the planer in my shop quite a bit(for maybe another year before I rotated the carbide cutters for the first time.

-- Wood is awesome.

View msinc's profile

msinc

497 posts in 620 days


#10 posted 08-15-2018 06:12 PM

Yeah, the Shelix is probably the way to go if you have a lot of planing to do. I have had very good luck with the original factory blades. In one year I just did turn them over. I have a spare set and soembody posted about calling DeWalt and being told that the blades with a little diamond engraved on the flat were a better grade HSS. I checked my replacements and they have it. Also, someone out there is making carbide tipped straight blades too. Google it, they run right around $100 or so.

View pintodeluxe's profile

pintodeluxe

5739 posts in 2929 days


#11 posted 08-15-2018 06:24 PM

I sometimes wondered if the people that “used the planer for years” without blade issue were using it much at all. I was in the frustrated camp, and was wearing out blades frequently. Every time you nick a blade, you have to take the time to flip the knives. Nick them a second time, and you’re buying new blades. Several times I had a nick develop on the same day I replaced the blades.

I switched to the Shelix head, and they are terrific. I’ve only rotated the knives once after a lengthy period of heavy use (two years and eight months to be exact). Incidentally, I’ve never seen a nick in the carbide cutters. I figured they’d be brittle, but they’re actually very high quality.

There are numerous other advantages to helical carbide cutters as well. For me, the noise reduction, and eliminating tearout in figured stock were key factors.

-- Willie, Washington "If You Choose Not To Decide, You Still Have Made a Choice" - Rush

View BroncoBrian's profile

BroncoBrian

754 posts in 2074 days


#12 posted 08-15-2018 06:29 PM

Willie – Do you have the OEM or smaller Shelix?

-- I'd like to see a forklift lift a crate of forks. It'd be so damn literal!

View pintodeluxe's profile

pintodeluxe

5739 posts in 2929 days


#13 posted 08-15-2018 06:52 PM

It’s slightly smaller in diameter than the stock cutterhead. I didn’t have snipe before or after the Shelix install. The only thing I noticed was the depth of cut gauge was off slightly. It would read “1/32” when it should read “0.” I slotted the holes used to mount the depth of cut gauge, and adjusted it to read correctly. Took all of ten minutes.

-- Willie, Washington "If You Choose Not To Decide, You Still Have Made a Choice" - Rush

View TheFridge's profile

TheFridge

10091 posts in 1602 days


#14 posted 08-15-2018 10:18 PM

It’s alder. What did you expect…

I ran a a couple trailer loads of dirty barn wood through it for the cost of 40 new inserts. If I’m gonna run a lot of dirty wood I take the 15-20 mins to turn them back to the knicked sides.

If I knew about the stock size head I woulda went that direction but the loss of depth is a minor annoyance.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

View Rich's profile

Rich

3524 posts in 705 days


#15 posted 08-16-2018 06:28 PM

I installed the OEM diameter Shelix. I work mostly in mesquite and the stock 735 blades were shot after maybe 200 linear feet. For fun once, I ran some mesquite slices through with stock blades, and the end grain cutting dulled the blades in about 20 minutes…lol

With an eBay 15% off coupon, I got the Shelix for $347, which is a really good price.

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

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