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Forum topic by bblogna posted 07-21-2011 10:46 PM 940 views 0 times favorited 8 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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bblogna

26 posts in 2132 days


07-21-2011 10:46 PM

Any disadvantages to using a 7and 1/4 inch blade in a 10 table saw other than depth of cut?


8 replies so far

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lew

11348 posts in 3223 days


#1 posted 07-21-2011 10:54 PM

Check with the manufacturer for the max specification on rpm’s

-- Lew- Time traveler. Purveyor of the Universe's finest custom rolling pins.

View cabmaker's profile

cabmaker

1507 posts in 2277 days


#2 posted 07-21-2011 11:28 PM

No dis advantage at all as long as the blade you use gives the desired results. I used to do it often on job saws or even in the shop when regular blades became dull, out for sharpening,etc. It will feel like you added more hp to your saw. Im sure your going to hear responses about blade deflection, overspinning,dah ta dah,etc. Just do it.

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crank49

3981 posts in 2439 days


#3 posted 07-22-2011 12:19 AM

If your saw is a newer model with a riving knife, there is a possibility you might not be able to make non-through cuts without removing the knife because it will protrude above the blade. Not a problem with through cuts, however. Depends on the saw and mounting of course. On my saw the knife is above the blade, level with the blade, or below the table. Just 3 choices.

-- Michael: Hillary has a long list of accomplishments, though most DAs would refer to them as felonies.

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Viktor

456 posts in 2886 days


#4 posted 07-22-2011 12:58 AM

Your splitter/riving knife might not fit into the kerf from 7 1/2 blade. Other than this only advantages: less waste, less noise, easier on the motor. I did not notice any deflection comparing to 10” blade. 7 1/2” could be twice as thin as 10”, but it is somewhat compensated by smaller diameter.

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knotscott

7225 posts in 2843 days


#5 posted 07-22-2011 01:26 AM

There are advantages and disadvantages to just about everything in the mechanical world. How you view them depends a lot on your needs and situation. The radius of a 7-1/4” blade is much tighter, so the attack angle will change vs a 10” blade…similar to increasing the hook angle. There can be pros and cons to that, but it’s likely to leave slightly more tearout than the same configuration on a 10” blade. The smaller blade can be easier to spin if your saw is underpowered.

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

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bblogna

26 posts in 2132 days


#6 posted 07-22-2011 03:29 AM

I have a ridgid R4510 jobsite saw. Idont really find it under powered but do think the smaller blade will help and the riving knife is removable so kerf isnt a problem.Might make a zero tolerance insert to help with the tearout. Thanks for all the input was just wondering if anybody else tried this.

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Grandpa

3256 posts in 2143 days


#7 posted 07-22-2011 03:34 AM

Most 10 inch saws run about 3500 RPM. Most portable saws run about 5500 to 6000 RPM. The blades are designed to operate at those RPM’s. Operating a blade at a lower RPM should not hurt a thing. The 10 inch blade passes X number of inches of blade per second past the table. The 7 inch blade will pass (turns the same RPM with a smaller radius) fewer inches of blade past the table so it seems that it would cut slower. Fewer teeth go past the wood you are cutting with the smaller blade. Does it hurt anything? No, not unless it messes up your wood in some way.

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Dusty56

11806 posts in 3156 days


#8 posted 07-22-2011 03:37 AM

Yes , this subject has been brought up several times here on LJs already.
The “search” button is an excellent feature to make use of : )
I have been using the smaller blades for years with no problems at all .

-- I'm absolutely positive that I couldn't be more uncertain!

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