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I want a finish that looks like no finish

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Forum topic by crank49 posted 07-20-2011 06:08 PM 1473 views 0 times favorited 19 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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crank49

3481 posts in 1692 days


07-20-2011 06:08 PM

Topic tags/keywords: basement shop finish wood sealer question

I have 3/8” tongue and groove beaded board plywood (pine) for the walls of my basment shop. I like the way it looks right now; bare. But, I absolutely need to coat it with something to seal the grain against moisture absorption and I want a finish that will not support mildew and mold; like I said, it’s a basement shop.

My basement shop is air conditioned and heated by the HVAC of the house. I have fixed my external drainage, sealed the concrete block walls, insulated the walls with foam board and a polyethelene vapor barrier . My bead board panels will be installed on a 2×4 framed wall over the top of all this. I think I will be good to go, but I want to protect the panels from moisture absorption. Sitting in the un-conditioned garage the panels are already starting to warp and mildew. The outdoor climate here in Tennessee this time of year is like walking through a hot wet towel.

I have used M1 additive to paint before and it seems to stop mildew just fine. It says it can be added to almost any oil or water based finish so I might use that. But, what finish would seal the wood without looking like it’s finished?

-- Michael :-{| “If you tell a big enough lie and tell it frequently enough, it will be believed.” ― A H


19 replies so far

View PurpLev's profile

PurpLev

8476 posts in 2370 days


#1 posted 07-20-2011 06:30 PM

try water based sinish – it will not alter the color of the wood much but will still give it a bit of a shine (you can use matt finish and rub it off a bit to minimize that effect though)

-- ㊍ When in doubt - There is no doubt - Go the safer route.

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crank49

3481 posts in 1692 days


#2 posted 07-20-2011 06:43 PM

Thanks for the reply PurpLev.
Would that be water based poly?

-- Michael :-{| “If you tell a big enough lie and tell it frequently enough, it will be believed.” ― A H

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PurpLev

8476 posts in 2370 days


#3 posted 07-20-2011 06:51 PM

yes.

I personally only used 1 water based product which is general finishes water based poly, but it seemed to do a good job for me to look for any other product

you can see some samples I finished here:
http://lumberjocks.com/PurpLev/blog/16615

mind you, even water based finish will change the appearance of the wood as it’ll add a film on top of it – but it’ll make the least amount of change as compared to oil based finishes (linseed, poly, laquer, etc)

-- ㊍ When in doubt - There is no doubt - Go the safer route.

View reggiek's profile

reggiek

2240 posts in 1992 days


#4 posted 07-20-2011 08:01 PM

You can also rub out most finishes into a low sheen that would appear as just natural wood. Basically you just put on the normal finish….then when dry…use rottenstone, rubbing compound or wet/dry sandpaper and a lubricating agent (water or oil) and rub down the finish…..This takes alot of the gloss away along with brush strokes, dust bumps…etc. The more rubbing the less finish (you have to be careful not to remove all the finish). There are many You Tube videos on how to do this so I will not go into alot of detail…or just google rubbing out a finish.

-- Woodworking.....My small slice of heaven!

View Loren's profile

Loren

7809 posts in 2369 days


#5 posted 07-20-2011 09:45 PM

Wax.

Super-blonde shellac is almost totally clear. It also blocks moisture
better than just about anything else. One coat of super-blonde
topcoated with wax would work better than just wax.

-- http://lawoodworking.com

View CharlieM1958's profile

CharlieM1958

15714 posts in 2940 days


#6 posted 07-21-2011 06:54 PM

I have to agree with PurpLev and respectfully disagree with cr1. Danish oil and paste wax is a great looking finish, but it will definitely add yellow overtones to your wood. Water-based polyurethane is the way to go. Keeping in mind these are shop walls, I don’t think you are really looking for hand-rubbed finish solutions (correct me if I’m wrong). Brushing on water-based poly would be fast, easy, and crystal-clear.

-- Charlie M. "Woodworking - patience = firewood"

View crank49's profile

crank49

3481 posts in 1692 days


#7 posted 07-21-2011 07:05 PM

What is the best finish for protecting wood in a humid environment; Water based, or Oil based?

I got a tiny can of MinWax PolyAcrylic satin last night at HD (cause it’s local) to test on a small piece. I already have some shellac to test along with good old Johnson’s paste wax.

This weekend I’ll try to get to Woodcraft (it’s a 90 mile round trip) to pick up a small can of “General Finishes” water base polyurethane and some Watco Danish Oil for testing.

I hope I’m not over thinking this. I just mainly want to protect the walls of my shop with something that won’t grow mildew and doesn’t look too shiny. I just want it to look like plain natural wood.

Thanks, everyone for your input.

-- Michael :-{| “If you tell a big enough lie and tell it frequently enough, it will be believed.” ― A H

View NathanAllen's profile

NathanAllen

376 posts in 1866 days


#8 posted 07-21-2011 09:12 PM

Pure (or Polymerized) Tung Oil, it’s near bulletproof from water and no shine, appearance will be wet wood (like when rubbed with Mineral Oil).

Otherwise go with a marine varnish if you want it to resist water/mildew.

View CharlieM1958's profile

CharlieM1958

15714 posts in 2940 days


#9 posted 07-21-2011 09:19 PM

cr1: I agree with you about the paint, but re-read his post . I quote: I like the way it looks right now; bare

Even the title of his post says he wants it to look unfinished.

-- Charlie M. "Woodworking - patience = firewood"

View Richard's profile

Richard

1045 posts in 1412 days


#10 posted 07-21-2011 09:36 PM

If what you want is a plain bare pine look then I think you already have what you need by useing shellac along with good old Johnson’s paste wax.
But I do agree that painting the walls white is a good idea in the shop to help with the lighting. But it’s your shop so go with what makes you happy.

View crank49's profile

crank49

3481 posts in 1692 days


#11 posted 07-21-2011 09:53 PM

It’s just a cozy feeling type thing. When I look at all the other shops here or in magazines, the ones I look at and say, “I’d like to work in there” usually have plain wood walls. The white painted walls just look too sterile and cold to me. I got paint at the office. My shop is an escape.

But, I will be painting the ceiling white, and the same question arises, “What is better for humididity and mildew resistance, oil base or water based paint ?”

-- Michael :-{| “If you tell a big enough lie and tell it frequently enough, it will be believed.” ― A H

View Cosmicsniper's profile

Cosmicsniper

2199 posts in 1880 days


#12 posted 07-21-2011 10:56 PM

Posting error…sorry

-- jay, www.allaboutastro.com

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Cosmicsniper

2199 posts in 1880 days


#13 posted 07-21-2011 10:58 PM

I’d say that finishes might be water resistant, but not necessarily humidity resistant.

This subject came up in a recent edition of Wood and Steel magazine (by Taylor guitars). When asked why guitar makers don’t finish the inside of guitars, owner Bob Taylor said that finishes aren’t vapor barriers…and humidity is water vapor. Hence, this is the reason why wood will continue to expand and contract over time, regardless if your entire work is “finished.”

Unless you are building a waterfall into the wall of your shop, or planning on defying gravity by setting drinks on the wall sideways, I wouldn’t worry about it from a humidity standpoint. I have a rustic pine hutch. I use paste wax. Putting a film finish on it would seem to be a crime.

If you want the wall natural, then leave it natural. Not everything has to be finished.

-- jay, www.allaboutastro.com

View Sawkerf's profile

Sawkerf

1730 posts in 1790 days


#14 posted 07-21-2011 11:48 PM

I think that you’ll like that Minwax Polycrylic. I use a lot of it and it gives a very durable finish without any color changes. The satin will have virtually no “shine”.

-- Adversity doesn't build character...................it reveals it.

View Cosmicsniper's profile

Cosmicsniper

2199 posts in 1880 days


#15 posted 07-21-2011 11:51 PM

BTW I’ve been spraying a lot of the General Finishes water-based satin urethane lately. I have to double check to make certain it’s actually there.

So, if you feel like you need something there, that’d be a great option.

-- jay, www.allaboutastro.com

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