LumberJocks

question for anyone that has used sewer & drian pipe for dust collection

  • Advertise with us

« back to Power Tools, Hardware and Accessories forum

Forum topic by taylormark posted 07-20-2011 04:51 AM 7987 views 2 times favorited 25 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View taylormark's profile

taylormark

2 posts in 1968 days


07-20-2011 04:51 AM

Hi
I have been reading up on dust collection and have decided to use 4” sewer and drain pipe. The 4” drain pipe that I have found measures 4 1/2” outside dia. which is too large to work with the 4” blast gates. I was wondering what have other members have done to get around this ???

thanks


25 replies so far

View Grandpa's profile

Grandpa

3256 posts in 2141 days


#1 posted 07-20-2011 05:20 AM

Pipe is measured on the inside and tubing is measured on the inside. Look for a bell reducer that has a 4” OD on one end and 4.5” ID on the other to fit the pipe. There are rubber connectors that will work for liquids that you can squeeze that much. Around here those are typically called by a brand name (Hubbless Connectors). I don’t think they make 3.5” PVC pipe but they do make a bunch of different adapters to join schedule 40 to schedule 80 or 20 etc. Go to a good plumbing shop and talk to them about it. They should be able to help you. This is not a job for WalMart. Go to a big plumbing shop where real plumbers go for components.

View longgone's profile

longgone

5688 posts in 2774 days


#2 posted 07-20-2011 05:32 AM

I use alot of 4” drain pipe on my dust collection system and have quite a few fittings that adapt it to make connections for other pipe and my various machines. Most of these connectors and adaptors can be founs at Rockler and Woodcraft.

View TheWoodNerd's profile

TheWoodNerd

288 posts in 2657 days


#3 posted 07-20-2011 02:38 PM

I used 6” S&D, built my own blast gates with plywood and S&D fittings.

http://www.thewoodnerd.com/workshop/dustCollection.html#blastgates

-- The Wood Nerd -- http://www.workshopaholic.net

View taylormark's profile

taylormark

2 posts in 1968 days


#4 posted 07-20-2011 04:36 PM

Thewoodnerd,
Very nice looking setup, I was wondering if you can give me any more info on your homemade blast gates ?
Also I never though of making my own pipe hangers from scrap wood, I might have to borrow that idea from you ;-)
thanks

View DLCW's profile

DLCW

530 posts in 2120 days


#5 posted 07-20-2011 04:40 PM

Just make sure you run a grounding wire through the pipes to carry static charge buildup to ground. In my non-metal sections of DC piping (flex hoses) I run a 14 gauge stranded copper wire (bought a 100’ roll at the local hardware store) and then connect it to the metal pipe which is tied to a ground rod. The other end is connected to a bolt on the machine chassis. Make sure you scrape a small section of paint away under the bolt to get a good ground.

-- Don, Diamond Lake Custom Woodworks - http://www.dlwoodworks.com - "If you make something idiot proof, all they do is make a better idiot"

View TheWoodNerd's profile

TheWoodNerd

288 posts in 2657 days


#6 posted 07-20-2011 04:58 PM

Grounding PVC is a myth. You simply can’t do it and it doesn’t matter anyway.

http://www.thewoodnerd.com/articles/dustExplosion.html

-- The Wood Nerd -- http://www.workshopaholic.net

View Lee Barker's profile

Lee Barker

2170 posts in 2316 days


#7 posted 07-20-2011 05:13 PM

This is one of those situations where Edison’s “pile of junk” quotation is very apt. I have used PVC, ABS, 4” galvanized, aluminum sheet, stovepipe elbows (aluminum and galavanized) and dryer flex (aluminum). Where you think there might be a leak, wrap it with plastic shrink wrap. Be creative and in a problem solving mode, rather than in a “what is on the shelf of the store that I have to buy so this is all the same color” tight spot.

If you have a run that you have to plug until it gets its designated tool, you might find that a cottage cheese carton lid is just the ticket.

Kindly,

Lee

-- "...in his brain, which is as dry as the remainder biscuit after a voyage, he hath strange places cramm'd with observation, the which he vents in mangled forms." --Shakespeare, "As You Like It"

View TheWoodNerd's profile

TheWoodNerd

288 posts in 2657 days


#8 posted 07-20-2011 07:42 PM

any more info on your homemade blast gates

No, that’s one of those things I keep meaning to write up, but I keep refining the design …

-- The Wood Nerd -- http://www.workshopaholic.net

View Don W's profile

Don W

17971 posts in 2033 days


#9 posted 07-20-2011 11:00 PM

I’ve used the connectors as mentioned and in some cases made my own. Sometimes you can grind the inside of one or the outside of another to make it fit. If not, metal wrap and duct tape will even serve. The connectors are best, but I hate to wait, so if I don’t have it, I will improvise.

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.net

View Vrtigo1's profile

Vrtigo1

434 posts in 2457 days


#10 posted 07-21-2011 05:34 AM

I used 4” S&D that I got at Lowes. Home Depot here doesn’t carry S&D anymore, they only have schedule 40 now. The cheapo plastic blast gates that I got at Harbor Freight fit right in the PVC nicely:

Also, I found an adapter that will take 4” S&D to something that you can easily fit 4” flex hose over at Home Depot. I don’t know what it’s called, but here’s a picture of it. I have two runs of 4” S&D, one goes to each side of my shop, and I just move the flex hose from my DC to whichever side I happen to be using.

In short, I just take whatever it is that I’m trying to connect and/or adapt with me to the store and walk around the plumbing / heating/AC aisles until I find something that will work. As already mentioned, Rockler and Woodcraft do have a pretty good selection of specialty adapters that are specifically designed for use with dust collection, but you will pay a premium going that route.

View Vrtigo1's profile

Vrtigo1

434 posts in 2457 days


#11 posted 07-21-2011 05:44 AM

By the way, I ran all of the 4” S&D along my garage walls just below the ceiling and made some quick and dirty support brackets out of plywood. Just cut plywood into 2 or 3 inch wide strips, then cut the strips into shorter pieces to assemble something that looks like this:

If you drill a hole in the slanted support piece 45 degrees to the face of the board (shown in blue above), you can get in there with a drill to screw the back piece to the wall. I used tapcons to anchor these to the cinder block walls of my garage in two places (yellow above). This works really well, and they’re really cheap and easy to make. I just used finishing nails to hold them together and they’re plenty strong enough for holding up PVC pipe if you space them every 4’ or so. I also used a larger version of these to mount some old speakers in my garage. They’re about 14Hx14DX36L and weigh maybe 30lbs. Two of these brackets worked perfectly for that as well.

View Grandpa's profile

Grandpa

3256 posts in 2141 days


#12 posted 07-22-2011 03:59 AM

http://home.comcast.net/~rodec/woodworking/articles/DC_myths.html
This is a very informative article on static and plastic pipe.

View dbhost's profile

dbhost

5607 posts in 2697 days


#13 posted 07-22-2011 04:58 PM

Like was mentioned above, pipe is measured ID, tube is measured OD. I have typically been able to run a bead of clear silicone caulk around th ejoint to seal it, and then hold it together with a couple of short sheet metal screws. I am using Lee Valley self cleaning aluminum blast gates if that helps any…

-- My workshop blog can be found at http://daves-workshop.blogspot.com

View Grandpa's profile

Grandpa

3256 posts in 2141 days


#14 posted 07-22-2011 11:16 PM

Can anyone here name a person that has had a fire in their dust collection system in a home shop? How do you ground an insulator such as plastic pipe?

View TheWoodNerd's profile

TheWoodNerd

288 posts in 2657 days


#15 posted 07-23-2011 02:37 AM

How do you ground an insulator such as plastic pipe?

You can only ground a fractional area around the grounding medium. In other words, the only way to ground PVC pipe is to wrap it in metal.

-- The Wood Nerd -- http://www.workshopaholic.net

showing 1 through 15 of 25 replies

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com